Joshua Rothkopf
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For 661 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Children of Paradise (1945)
Lowest review score: 20 The Equalizer
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 661
661 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Life During Wartime slices deeply into its characters' weaknesses.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Very little gets in the way of Lebanon's apocalyptic mood; if it turns its audience even slightly away from barbarism, it might have done its job.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The strength of Animal Kingdom is its slow-building fatalism; the criminals' luck runs out, but then finds depressing extension via an out-of-left-field collaborator. It's a movie that has very little faith in authority, not even in Guy Pearce's righteous detective. The only law here is Darwin's.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    All of the performances are knockouts, especially The Visitor's Richard Jenkins as a damaged Texas spiritualist who steeps the movie in intimacy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    His (Fatih Akin) new movie, an occasionally shouty comedy, is easily his most fun.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Roger Corman could only dream of producing a movie this stupefyingly gory and loaded with exposed flesh, making the updated Piranha that most unlikely of remakes-an improvement.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie's real asset is Reynolds himself, utilizing his comedy chops for unexpected levity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The new Let Me In does more than merely preserve the original's mood; it actually improves on it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Sally Hawkins cruises into her new movie the same way she did her breakthrough, "Happy-Go-Lucky."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Phillips goes too far sometimes (border-jail breakout?), but his new direction is promising.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    There's a darker, fanatical side to blindness too-and this is the movie to show it. Leave all judgments behind.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Suleiman can be criticized for failing, ever so slightly, at crafting an overall structure-his latest, based on his dad's diary and other memories, is an autobiographical story of exile and return that skips like a stone over water, fleetly but not so deeply. Still, this is a welcome example of kitsch wedded to serious indictment.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Unpacks the man's story with a dramatic flair that might be mistaken for Zoolanderiffic, if it weren't so aptly accessible.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Though his results are sometimes raw, Dolan seems to be chronicling heartache as he discovers it. Indulge him.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's a quietly witty film, much like the dude himself.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The Arbor's pummeling second half begins with the collapse of its celebrity subject; the following spirals of self-destruction make you suspect that some childhoods are simply too hard to escape. Tough, worthy stuff.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Fantastical is what we get: Cameraman is filled with Cardiff's achingly beautiful work.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The unexpectedly wonderful thing about this sequel is that it actually improves on the jokes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Director Radu Muntean has pulled off the near-impossible, turning each scene (captured in capacious long takes) into arias of generosity for his actors.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    This film's effectively wrought communion between once-spooked man and animal is more than enough for any entertainment. It rides easily into your heart.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    If you're even slightly interested in folk music, there will be something here to simmer that curiosity into a full-on boil: the Arabic trip-hop stylings of monomonikered rapper-singer Raiz, raspy Pietra Montecorvino's Stevie Nicks–like dance tunes, a gorgeous sax solo from local jazz legend James Senese.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    A movie that could terrify parents while charming them with its compassion.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Another Earth is a movie you take home and write your own ending to.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    What might have been a long walk off a short pier becomes a valid, vital rethinking of a crime classic.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    All of this is way smarter than it needs to be - and it's only the prologue to the main event, which explodes the film into awkwardness but a weird kind of triumph, too.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The pieces here are wonderful, even if the documentary fails to make any kind of overall analytical point.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    If this profile is marred slightly by thematic tidiness and a willingness to overglorify the champion's rise (Fischer didn't even write his best-seller, Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess), it still supplies a cracked, conflicted genius trapped in his ceaseless endgame.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The rush of A-listers combined with apocalyptic dread creates its own kind of dizzy pleasure: Who's going down next on this Poseidon Adventure?
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Into the Abyss is too self-admiring of its own loose ends to come to the indictment that would put it in the company of "The Thin Blue Line," but these personalities stay in your head - which is the whole point.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It is during Melancholia's second half, after a ruinous conclusion to the wedding, that the real magic happens, with our heroine hardened into a wry, cynical Cassandra - the voice of Von Trier himself.