For 1,480 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J.R. Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 In Bruges
Lowest review score: 0 Blindness
Score distribution:
1480 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Visually and dramatically it works well - it's Shakespeare by way of "Black Hawk Down" - but as an allegory of modern-day geopolitics it doesn't really go anywhere.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Emotionally charged but not entirely honest documentary.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    What might have been a serious drama about coming to terms with violence and loss turns into a crowd-pleasing and increasingly far-fetched remake of "Death Wish."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Brothers Brad and John Hennegan track six thoroughbreds in the qualifying races running up to the 2006 Kentucky Derby, yet the horseflesh isn't as interesting to them as the owners and trainers, an odd assortment of moneymen and equine gurus with a culture all their own.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Jeb Stuart directed, his well-rounded portrait of the community partly undermined by the slack editing; with Rick Schroder as the minister and Michael Rooker as the defense attorney.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    More or less restages Tobe Hooper's 1974 original, including its much-loved family dinner scene.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    George Clooney produced and stars in this international spy thriller, which he probably thought of as existential but which registers onscreen as a giant bore.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Luhrmann's squirrelly, five-exclamation-point stylings mercifully subside after the first 20 minutes or so, leaving behind a palatable big-screen confection.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Based on a story by Steve Martin of all people, the script seldom rises above formula (Guy Pearce and Neal McDonough are especially ill served as a pair of starchy FBI agents), but its respectful treatment of Islam is both unusual and welcome.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    It's the angriest comedy I've encountered all year, though it's pretty well spoiled by Carrey, who insists on turning it into a star vehicle with his slapstick and spazz attacks.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    By the time director Patrice Leconte arrives at his predictable climax and conventional moral, this lethargic French comedy may not have any friends either.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The main pleasure of this high-stakes-poker drama is watching a septuagenarian Burt Reynolds effortlessly revive his 70s screen persona as a strutting paragon of male shrewdness and sexuality.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Director Nigel Cole is best known for "Calendar Girls" (2003), another condescending exercise in you-go-girl uplift.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Watching Best Worst Movie, you can't help but notice that the Troll 2 crowd consists almost exclusively of people in their 20s, which makes perfect sense: manufacturing an obsession with a terrible movie probably seems more worthwhile if you think you've got all the time in the world.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    As the WWF-style villain, Stiller misfires again and again, but Vaughn is reliably funny and Rip Torn has a great part as the underdogs' crotchety old coach.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Notorious on the festival circuit for its excruciating scenes of self-mutilation.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    After 9/11 and Katrina, this megabudget remake by Wolfgang Petersen benefits from a similar cultural oomph, though it's just as enjoyably silly as the original.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This sitcom setup is as bad as it sounds, and Cox never really surmounts it, though the characters deepen significantly after the missionary is caught caressing the waiter and sent home to be excommunicated and shamed by his family.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Despite a three-hour running time Stone is too occupied with psychodrama to explore Alexander's innovations in battle, and Farrell, clearly out of his depth, seems less a leader of men than a Hellenistic James Dean.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Like her previous feature, "Look at Me" (2004), this relationship drama is mature and intelligent, but the character conflicts are so decorously handled that after a while the whole enterprise begins to seem more like a good waiter than a good story.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This new version is an almost scene-for-scene remake, which is good news in the first half and bad news in the torpid second.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Unfortunately Jia --a rather limited actor, judging from the movies excerpted here -- has trouble either articulating or projecting the existential crisis that ultimately landed him in a mental institution, which leaves the emotional center of the film inert.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Warmly and gently handled, though the central story, detailing the personal politics between him and the six childlike monsters, steadily loses steam.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Accommodates some great water photography.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Scenes of harvested frogs provide an apt metaphor for Brazil's miserable have-nots, so apt that Kohn can't resist beating it to death.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Naturally, age and infirmity are a major subtext of Shine a Light (and, really, any movie featuring Keith Richards). No matter how cadaverous the Stones appear, they keep climbing onstage, and I’ll miss them when they’re finally gone.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The big green babysitter is back, but the charm has evaporated.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    An overloaded script by Heidi Thomas... defeats a fine cast
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This originated as a late-night play, and the humor is correspondingly sophomoric, but I loved Dennis McCarthy's melodramatic score.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The Israeli academy showered awards--best picture, director, screenplay, editing, cinematography, sound, costumes, actress, supporting actress, supporting actor--on this coming-of-age story, which makes its modest whimsy even harder to get excited about.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    As in "Breaking Upwards," the best joke here is that the wives (Jenna Fischer, Christina Applegate) wind up getting more action during the marital recess than their hapless hubbies.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This has some currency as ethnography, showing how tribal and interpersonal matters mesh with sports mania, but it remains a formidably dull account of an inherently exciting pastime.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Vanessa Redgrave bails out this mushy Italian-postcard romance.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The connection between the two narratives is supposed to be a big, heartbreaking surprise, though I figured it out well in advance and spent the interim unfavorably comparing this greatest-generation hanky wringer to the British drama "Iris."
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    It’s one thing to make a movie filled with mayhem and then implicate the audience for watching it; it’s another thing entirely to come back ten years later with the same movie, hype it with a marketing campaign, and try to implicate the viewer again. One nice thing about America is that you can’t be tried twice for the same crime.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Joffe, a British screenwriter (The American, 28 Weeks Later) debuting as director, hits some of these notes in his adaptation of Brighton Rock, but the movie's religious flourishes seem more rhetorical than heartfelt.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Unfortunately I can't give this a thumbs-up or thumbs-down; I haven't yet developed an aesthetic that will accommodate a guy firing a bottle rocket from his ass.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    As the aching spouse, Moore delivers what is for her an unusually sympathetic performance.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The main characters are a couple of revered high school table-tennis champs (one short and aggressive, the other tall and moody), and their efforts to win a big national tournament accommodate plenty of Zen aphorisms, glaring showdowns, and slow-motion paddle swinging.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    It's a subject that guarantees a certain amount of liberal tongue clucking, though director Jeff Renfroe wisely concentrates on suspense instead of sermons.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Film noir has seldom been so blanc.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    As in Korine's other movies, characterization is often just amplified weirdness.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This begins to get interesting in the home stretch, as the woman's chronic deception begins to catch up with her, but for the most part it's an extended Geritol commercial.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Alison Eastwood, whose good looks and last name have served her well as a Hollywood actress, makes her directing debut with this mediocre cancer drama.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Writer-directors Jon Hurwitz and Hayden Schlossberg are content to trot out the familiar gags and characters, and the murmurs of recognition I heard in the preview audience indicate that the series has become some kind of sad generational touchstone.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The scenes of his incarceration and escape from the place are gripping, thanks mainly to Michael Bowen as the hard-ass staffer who wants to break him. But the movie slides toward melodrama with some stale business about the hero spreading his late father's ashes.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Joel and Ethan Coen wrote the story, using the ancient gag of the toxic Santa as a vehicle for their patented brand of misanthropy; Zwigoff and company wring some laughs out of it, though the tone is uniformly mean and vulgar.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The opening stretch, when the visitor arrives on earth and blithely dresses down mankind, is great fun. But screenwriter David Scarpi has drained away much of the sentiment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Main drawback is a relative dearth of clips showing Hicks in his ferocious prime, so if you come away from this wondering what all the fuss is about.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The early scenes of Greene misbehaving on the air are pretty funny, thanks mainly to Martin Sheen as the apoplectic station manager. But I was bummed out by the movie's trite VH1 cartoon of the black power era--especially coming from Kasi Lemmons, who made her directing debut with the hauntingly ambiguous "Eve's Bayou."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    It often seems precious and overconceived, its accumulating crosses and double-crosses as devoid of consequence as a child's backyard game.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    It wasn't so bad, aside from the god-awful ending; at the very least Freundlich manages to come up with funnier jokes than the ossified one-liners decorating Allen's recent movies.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This is dumb, raunchy, and obvious, but it's also pretty funny, and delivered with the gusto of a Redd Foxx monologue.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    A relatively mindless thrill ride that would have made the old NBC execs grin from ear to ear.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The surprise ending is neatly done, but the characters are so thin that waiting around for it is no fun whatsoever.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The cluttered narrative leaves little room for character development, though director Niels Arden Oplev does manage to accommodate plenty of gratuitous torture and rape.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Despite all the grand gestures of climax and resolution, there's a pronounced sense of autopilot; the only person who seems to be having a good time is Ian McKellen as the scheming Magneto.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    McGee has taken Hitchcock's idea of the MacGuffin to such an extreme that the plot becomes a set of nesting dolls with nothing at the center, but the players conjure up a smoky mood of existential sadness.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    At their best, the Jackasses combine low-brow humor with delectable absurdity (one of my favorite gags from Jackass: The Movie had a guy creeping up on a cougar while dressed as a giant mouse), but here it's almost pure punishment.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Hamstrung by its polemics.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The romantic plot, involving his unrequited loved for Garner, is soured by her character's unconcealed shallowness: she won't have him because his genes aren't up to snuff.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    There are strong turns by Michael Caine as Alfred the butler and Tom Wilkinson as a ruthless crime boss.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    What has changed, however, is the audience consuming it: back in 1971, the Peckinpah film horrified moviegoers with its bloody climax, whereas today people are so vengeful and sadistic that the remake is just another multiplex crowd pleaser.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Writer-director Len Wiseman, now the star's husband, wisely moves this sequel to the countryside and wastes less time dispensing the same grog of grisly CGI combat and mythical mumbo jumbo.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    There's a good deal of honest emotion onscreen, particularly from the parents left behind to worry, yet the documentary sometimes feels like the work of a filmmaker who began with a preconceived story and wasn't quite sure what to do with the one she actually got.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The strain to pull all this together becomes more evident as the movie progresses, and the three-way musical finale, a rickety acoustic run-through of “The Weight,” hardly lives up to the stars’ reputations.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This is marginally better than most, with a few offbeat comic ideas, a reliably droll performance from Vaughn, and, as the parents, four watchable old troupers in search of a fat paycheck.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Inception delivers dazzling special effects and a boatload of stars, but it sags and eventually buckles under the weight of its complicated premise.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    A suitable mainstream vehicle for Malkovich's bruised aloofness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The true schism here, however, is between the brainless fun of the action plot and Stone's cheap exploitation of the cartels' real-life sadism.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    I found this sequel more tolerable than Sherlock Holmes (2009), though I'm not sure whether it's actually better or I've just accepted the putrid idea of turning Arthur Conan Doyle's brainy detective into just another quipping action hero.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Despite the lowbrow story, this is supposed to be tasteful; expect modest nudity, swelling strings, and plenty of water imagery.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Its labored goofiness seldom transcends the stale format.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Offers a steady supply of clever lines but suffers from the patina of self-loathing common to industry lifers and the unfortunate miscasting of straight-arrow Broderick as a depressed, cynical hack.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This adaptation of the best-selling novel by Stephenie Meyer never rises above the level of a teen soaper on the CW, and its pale, sulky boy toys (Kellan Lutz, Peter Facinelli, Jackson Rathbone) are more silly than scary.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The torture is strictly for kicks, which spoiled this for me, but less skittish viewers may enjoy this as a stylish and tightly wound genre piece.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Never really delivers on that promise, mainly because its scenes of two brilliant men discussing the nature of the subconscious can't compare with Cronenberg's visual rendering of that subconscious in earlier movies.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The famously oblique French director Alain Resnais (Last Year at Marienbad) won a special award at the Cannes film festival for this existential comedy (2009), whose masterful technique fails to compensate for its glassy characters and mercilessly self-amused tone.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The beloved 1938 children's book about a house painter who becomes guardian to a dozen penguins has been turned into a standard-issue children's comedy with Jim Carrey.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    At one point screenwriter James C. Strouse name-checks the brilliant Richard Yates, whose fiction similiarly perches between grim humor and utter despair, but the movie's hip detachment is a far cry from the unruly passions of Yates's chronic losers.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Assorted movie in-jokes should keep parents tolerably entertained, and Alan Menken's songs mercifully favor western swing over the expected twang pop.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This wacky Australian comedy about a struggling rock band is tolerable fun, neither as inventive as Bob Rafelson's 60s sitcom "The Monkees" nor as hilariously bad as Ron Howard's made-for-TV cult movie "Cotton Candy" (1978).
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This being senior year, Burstein can't help but capture some genuine drama, but there's a stage-managed quality to the movie that reminded me of MTV reality shows.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The movie clicks along pretty well until they launch their elaborate plot against the merchants of death, which seems to go on forever.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Like the incessant ringing of cowbells in the first two segments, the film may either hypnotize you or drive you stark staring mad.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Overlong, undercooked drama.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    An agreeably shallow comedy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The result is an uneasy mix of Coen-style laughs (particularly evident in the big comic close-ups) and Zhang's majestic imagery (in one shot the couple's divorce papers shatter into a burst of confetti).
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Claudel commits the cardinal sin of withholding the full story until the very end, when it spills out in a histrionic scene between the two sisters and largely exonerates the older one.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This is fairly satisfying, particularly a ghoulish episode in a Victorian insane asylum.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The first third is terrific...After that the movie settles into a series of ho-hum conflicts and complications, and the requisite slam-bang ending is perfunctory at best.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    A genial cast and moderately funny script prevail over the sort of sappy music cues and white-bread settings that have become the grating norm in Hollywood rom-coms.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Though its intentions are noble, it's hampered by a stock romantic subplot (Phillipe falls for his friend's squeeze, Abbie Cornish), a familiar structure (since The Best Years of Our Lives soldiers invariably come home in threes), and a lack of symmetry (some of Gordon-Levitt's story seems to have wound up on the cutting-room floor).
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    "Cut" is the most interesting of the three shorts because Park uses the opportunity to take stock of his career and the excruciating cruelty of his movies.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Apatow and director Jake Kasdan deliver a fair number of laughs, though nearly every good idea is pressed into service as a running gag. The biggest disappointment is their survey of rock history, which has all the depth of a Time-Life book.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Blaise and Walker cleverly widen the aspect ratio as the hero's consciousness changes and make some lovely pictures of the northern lights, but the atrocious Phil Collins score (with a vocal by Tina Turner) filled me with evil spirits.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Jeff Lipsky invests this indie drama with admirable intelligence and insight, though these fine qualities are undermined by a sense of writerly artifice.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This tepid sequel to Harold Ramis's mobster-on-the-couch comedy "Analyze This" (1999) is partially redeemed by Robert De Niro's handful of scenes with Cathy Moriarty-Gentile, who made her screen debut as the teenage wife in "Raging Bull."
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The script is a lifeless succession of attorney-client debates and stormy horror flashbacks, though I had a good time watching Jennifer Carpenter, a comic Buffy type in "White Chicks" and "D.E.B.S.," hurl herself around as the title character.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The story is so packed with over-the-top characters (including a hit man and hustler played by Jamie Foxx) that no one gets a chance to breathe.

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