For 1,480 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J.R. Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 The Proposition
Lowest review score: 0 The Back-up Plan
Score distribution:
1,480 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    This documentary on the history of gospel music can't measure up to George T. Nierenberg's colorful "Say Amen, Somebody" (1982), but it's so jammed with great archival performances, most of them included in their entirety, that it's worth seeing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    It certainly fulfills all the conventions of the genre: sci-fi premise, noir stylings, martial arts, snarky dialogue.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Actor John Turturro follows his charming and colorful travel documentary "Rehearsal for a Sicilian Tragedy" (2009) with this assured and freewheeling look at the music of Naples (2010).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Dramatically objectifies the unfair trade practices that help keep Africa mired in poverty.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    This is jammed with cliches but completely engrossing, in the manner of a movie ardently in love with its own bullshit.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    With his delicate mix of sick humor and compassion, Goldthwait is that rare comic writer who can legitimately be compared to Lenny Bruce.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The movie's realism is unimpeachable, though American cops might be stunned by the idea of a half-dozen detectives being assigned to the murder of an anonymous floater.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    This is affecting and thematically pointed but much more pat than the situation that precedes it, in which two different realities must coexist uneasily on the same screen.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    First-time director Chen Shi-Zheng shows great sensitivity to the pressure and isolation felt by Chinese brains at American universities, and the relationship between Liu and Quinn provides a rare look at the intellectual serfdom of graduate study.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The Scandinavian moodiness of the first half gives way to a series of jolting set pieces in the second.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The injustice of the girl's thwarted career goes only so far, though Feret pushes it in some interesting directions.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The comic juice tends to spill out in all directions.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The purpose of the Bond girl, and of the Bond film, is still to stroke the male ego. Bond changes just enough to stay exactly the same.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    As in "My Favorite Year," the laughs all come from seeing a nervous innocent pulled into the star's debauchery, the heart from our growing realization that debauchery is just emptiness with the volume cranked.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Levin's curiosity and evenhandedness distinguish the movie.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Thomas Hardy it's not, but as far as middlebrow British romances go, better this than "Love Actually."
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Michael Sheen, who adds to his gallery of public figures (Tony Blair, David Frost) with a sharp performance here as the legendary UK soccer coach Brian Clough.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    A small but achingly authentic piece of kitchen-sink realism, this might never have made it across the pond without babe du jour Keira Knightley, excellent in a supporting role as a smacked-out waitress. But the real wonder is Parker, whose vulnerability and wraithlike beauty are devastating.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Concise and thoughtful.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Given the tension dogging her every step, I wondered if this would end in bloodshed, but Abu-Assad opts for a more hopeful conclusion, making his film -- strange as it may seem -- a comedy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Allouache's script is so packed with incident that the characters have little time for debate, but the tension between fundamentalist and modern morality is woven into the action.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Luckily LaGravenese has incorporated some of the real students' piercingly honest diary entries and rounded up an engaging cast of unknowns and young actors (April Hernandez, Kristin Herrera, Hunter Parrish) to channel their anger and hopelessness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The movie eventually begins to wilt under the sober, plodding direction of Steve Jacobs, but the thoughtful screenplay gives Malkovich a complex, increasingly reflective character arc that he plays with great feeling, making the professor’s redemption seem honestly won.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Grimly mesmerizing saga.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Diaz, costars Jason Segel and Justin Timberlake, and a sharp supporting cast manage to deliver a crappy good time, mercifully devoid of any heart-tugging teacher-student subplots.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The real star is the splendid computer-generated Hulk, though his King Kong-like story is compromised by the need to keep him around for the inevitable sequel.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Comparisons with Michael Mann's recent Dillinger biopic "Public Enemies" are inevitable, and mostly flattering to this project: director Jean-Francois Richet and screenwriter Abdel Raouf Dafri take advantage of the additional screen time (about 100 minutes more than Mann had) to flesh out their protagonist, who fancies himself an honorable thief and even a left-wing revolutionary but ultimately turns out to be something much simpler: a man who loves his work.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    XXY
    Moody and thoughtful.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Jason Reitman follows his pitch-perfect satire "Thank You for Smoking" with another adventurous comedy, though here the cleverness can be grating; the movie is distinctive for its complicated emotions.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    A respectable entry in the Bicycle Thief school of art-house cinema, which uses a child's coming of age to explore an era of political and social turmoil.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    With its black-and-white flashbacks and relentlessly earnest tone, this sometimes threatens to become a PBS documentary, yet its script is exceptionally fluid, tracing the tributaries of art, race, and sexuality that feed one's sense of self.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The most poignant performance comes from Allen, a retired stock analyst who clings to his masculine pride even though his body's falling apart on him.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Fascinating: supposedly the crooks kept all the cash and jewelry, but their sponsors in the MI5 were really after sexually explicit blackmail photos of Princess Margaret and other aristocrats that were being held by the revolutionary Michael X.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The action is so relentless that after a while things start to feel hollow, but Rodriguez still seems to believe the moral articulated at the end of the first film -- that keeping a family together is the real adventure.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Rodriguez's evident delight in the form make this a worthwhile piece of eye candy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Packed with dialogue and issues, and it’s most provocative when dealing with the dangers of plea bargaining.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The visual monotony of talking heads and stock footage is interrupted occasionally by the spectral charcoal drawings of veteran Si Lewen, though his art is used to full advantage only when he describes the liberation of Buchenwald.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Ayoade owes a debt to Wes Anderson (Rushmore), but the parents here are so beautifully written, and Hawkins and Taylor particularize them so well, that the movie manages to hold its own.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The movie is enjoyable for its flashy surfaces--the witty editing, the narrative forecasting, the droll omniscient voice-over--but as drama it seems superficial.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Flawed but ambitious, this biopic of British parliamentarian William Wilberforce closely tracks the political maneuvering of the late 18th and early 19th century as reformers campaign to end Britain's participation in the slave trade.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    A missed opportunity, though as usual Quaid is dazzling.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The most daring aspect of the film, fully realized in Bello's grave performance, may be the notion that a parent can invest endless love in a child and one day find him unfathomable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Documentarians Adam Del Deo and James Stern present a cogent and comprehensive postmortem of the 2004 presidential election in Ohio.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    A biting academic fable about the importance of aggression over intellect.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Avrich offers a cogent appraisal of Wasserman's importance to the industry and duly notes the darker aspects of his empire (among them MCA's alleged ties to organized crime).
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Treacle takes over in the last act, but most of this fact-based story by screenwriters Michael Bortman and Allison Burnett takes the inspirational sports drama into unexpected and morally complex territory.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Bier is one of the cinema's most acute observers of intimate relations, her Scandinavian reserve muting the inherent melodrama of her material, and she draws piercing, modestly scaled performances from Duchovny, Del Toro, Alison Lohman, and John Carroll Lynch.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    An excellent British drama adapted by Alan Bennett (The Madness of King George) from his celebrated play.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    A gravely beautiful drama about the mysteries of aging and death.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The result is pretty entertaining, though most of that entertainment derives from Katz's skillful exploitation of gumshoe formula.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The CGI is excellent, with characters whose depth and solidity suggest Nick Park's clay animations.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Quicker on the uptake than any of Eddie Murphy's fat ladies, quicker even than Flip Wilson's Geraldine Jones.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Two prequels' worth of scene setting pays off in the politically resonant Revenge of the Sith.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Debuting as director, Ayer once again points his loose cannon directly into the body politic: the protagonist of this sour but haunting tale is a crazed army ranger just returned from overseas (Christian Bale) who's so full of war that even the LAPD won't hire him.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    In his narration Brown says that he wants to dispel the image of surfers as airheaded slackers, an ambition undercut by his own breathless and clumsy writing. But to his credit he collects some fascinating stories.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Toward the end the freak-show humor begins to yield diminishing returns, but for most of its length this delivers a steady stream of uncomfortable gut laughs.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Boy
    Waititi's comic vocabulary hasn't changed much-there's a lot of voice-over narration illustrated with ludicrous, cartoonish tableaux - yet the kids' genuine longing for their no-good dad elevates this above simple deadpan humor.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    It's the most exciting stand-up performance I've seen in years, yet in all honesty I can't say it made me laugh that much.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    French director Andre Techine (Alice and Martin) powerfully re-creates the mass exodus from the city and draws a fine performance from Beart as a woman struggling to shield her children from her own fear and confusion. Unfortunately the last act goes off the rails.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Offers a fascinating inquiry into memory and art, mixing clips from Fellini's films with contemporary shots of the same locales in and around Rome.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Born in Hamburg to Turkish parents, director Fatih Akin brought an unusual cultural perspective to "Head On" about a marriage of convenience between a beautiful Turk and a suicidal German. In The Edge of Heaven, his first dramatic feature since then, the characters navigate the same cultural divide, but here Akin is more preoccupied with the sense of responsibility that links parents to their children (or vice versa).
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    As a substantial piece of the puzzle, this is worthwhile viewing.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Harsh but moving drama.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    This may conjure up unpleasant memories of Guy Ritchie's "Sherlock Holmes" movies, but Ritchie could learn a lot from director James McTeigue (V for Vendetta); this is multiplex fare to be sure, but McTeigue manages to popularize 19th-century literature without completely vulgarizing it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Contemporary footage of sea creatures, reptiles, and insects serves to illustrate various chapters in our journey from the ocean floor to the megastore, and though the film's science isn't exactly rigorous, its photography and music are splendid.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The story might have been lifted from an old Warner Brothers melodrama, though it's smartly paced, sincerely delivered, and consistently absorbing.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Modeling the movie after the show itself grows problematic near the end, when Stern and Del Deo, anticipating that climactic, gold-suited kick line, try to whip us into a frenzy on opening night.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Unfortunately, this comeback movie, a labor of love for mush-headed screenwriter and star Jason Segel, errs on the side of sweetness and nostalgia; except for a few good zingers from balcony dwellers Statler and Waldorf, there isn't much here for mom and dad.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    As Gibney follows Abramoff through the decades, he traces a solid line from Reagan’s mantra of deregulation to the financial collapse of 2008, showing how three decades of procapitalist lobbying have pushed most Americans out into the cold.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    This conceit works precisely because Thatcher's popular appeal was so deeply rooted in nostalgia for the days of empire, and Streep, no fan of Thatcher, nicely undercuts the poignancy of her current condition with flashbacks that reveal her brittle arrogance in office.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    For his third feature, Richard Kelly delivers neither a triumph (like his first, Donnie Darko) nor a travesty (like his second, Southland Tales) but a sure-handed genre piece that manages to wrap up before its plot mushrooms completely out of control.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    This ensemble drama by screenwriter David Hubbard isn't perfect, but its harsh honesty and sincere faith in humanity make it genuinely uplifting.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Ratliff fails to deliver on any of these ideas and the ending falters badly, but as horror flicks go this is both smart and suspenseful.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The dialogue is superior, though, and director Roman Polanski has cast the characters well; Foster is particularly impressive in a stridently unattractive role, as the pinched, angry liberal who's orchestrated the meeting but doesn't get quite the apology she wants.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    It's the first stop-motion feature filmed entirely in stereoscopic 3-D, and the technique makes Selick's artwork even more wondrously creepy. The problem is Gaiman's story, which keeps accumulating otherworldly mythology but doesn't establish a clear line of action in the home stretch.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    There are some striking visuals and Hartnett is a magnetic presence.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Helms's screen persona-the stiff-necked nerd who triumphs through sheer doggedness-is heavily reminiscent of Harold Lloyd's, though Lloyd was handsome and endearing enough to succeed as a romantic lead.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    At 116 minutes, it's a test not of speed but endurance.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Soggy and predictable screenplay.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Australian mockumentary offers plenty of cheap laughs early on.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The new jokes all seem like discards from a Rob Schneider comedy, but for the most part director Peter Segal (Anger Management) and screenwriter Sheldon Turner play a good defensive game, sticking close to the original film's story.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    As summer shoot-'em-ups go, this is pretty well executed, with plenty of macho posing and gunfire.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    It milks the characters' father-son relationship for drama without making the fairly obvious connection to the agency's paternalistic view of the world.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Donzelli, a busy actress in France, directed this drama from a script she wrote with Elkaim, which may explain why the parents become the center of the movie while the ostensibly suffering boy never takes shape as a character.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The end result is more like a supermarket on Saturday afternoon. The content is engaging, though.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Anthony Peckham's script is formulaic, woodenly reverent, and devoid of real dramatic tension.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The plot contrivances that bring them together to torture each other are so deftly handled that I almost bought them, and the two leads are charming and funny enough to offset the characters' obnoxious motives.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    As usual with Stallone's Rocky sequels, the schmaltz is unbearable, but the fight is plausibly handled, and Stallone's sincere sadness at growing older makes this an unexpectedly satisfying conclusion to the series.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Undeniably well executed.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Watt's script is a bit overstuffed, and by the end the roiling animated sequences (drawn by Emma Kelly and inked by Watt and Clare Callinan) are wearing out their welcome. But the convincing characters and hearty examination of mortality make this fresh and oddly uplifting.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Kurt Russell gives a terse, unsentimental performance as coach Herb Brooks, but director Gavin O'Connor sticks to the "Hoosiers" playbook.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The gags are as idiotic as you'd expect, but they consistently hit the bull's-eye.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    A box office phenomenon in France, this crowd-pleasing drama is based on a true story but sticks closely to the template for a Hollywood buddy movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Snippets of the band's brutally percussive music punctuate the endless encounter sessions, which expose the musicians' boundless self-absorption (the 9-11 attacks come and go without so much as a mention) and cowed obedience to their psychological guru.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Sheridan gives this a pacing and depth one doesn't often find in "urban" product, though Jackson, reliving his own life traumas, is handily upstaged at every turn by Terrence Howard (Crash) as his oddball manager.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Agresti has more on his mind than tugging at heartstrings.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Krause is completely believeable as the solid old man, and though the story moves slower than molasses, it leaves the same dark aftertaste.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    As bad-taste comedies go, this is more clever than gross.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    In a recent "Sun-Times" article Jeff said he purposely avoided taking a son's perspective, which leaves him without much perspective at all.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    As an avid media watcher, I didn't come away from this with any new insights, but the movie is a pretty good snapshot of the daily newspaper business in transition and turmoil.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Ben Stiller produced, and the movie is so reminiscent of "Zoolander" that I wish he had rounded up Owen Wilson and starred in it himself. Farrell and Heder are pretty funny, but they're consistently upstaged by supporting players William Fichtner, Will Arnett, and Amy Poehler.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The characters and themes are redolent of earlier and better Williams works, and the story unexpectedly putters out at the end--but seeing it now, you can't help but treasure the simple, lyrical dialogue and sure-handed narrative thrust.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Highly recommended if you want to see a distinguished cast of British character actors tarted up in garish Victorian costumes and badly executing a Three Stooges-style cake fight.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Michael Webber's documentary "The Elephant in the Living Room" (2010) makes such a powerful case against private ownership of exotic wild animals that this portrait of circus owner David Balding and his beloved elephant Flora seems sentimental by comparison.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The remake is plenty scary, though any moral inquiry into the cost of revenge seemed to fly over the heads of the screaming, laughing crowd I saw it with.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    As usual, the three instrumentalists (Ray Manzarek, John Densmore, Robby Krieger) take a backseat to their gorgeous front man, though their nimble, idiosyncratic playing has aged much better than his pretentious poetry.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The climactic sight gag is lifted from Monicelli's movie like a diamond from a jeweler's window.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    It's good sleazy fun for a while, jacked up with an assortment of edgy visuals, but the greenish yellow tint favored by action director Tony Scott is a good metaphor for the movie's jaundiced sensibility.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This Indiana Jones knockoff goes down smoothly enough, and Jolie isn't bad at all, though every time she opened her mouth I expected Mick Jagger to come dancing down her tongue.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    A philosophical comedy about man's place in a universe colonized by Targets and Wal-Marts.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    After she's forced to confess, director Marc Rothemund doesn't have much to do but marvel at her heroic defiance, and the film is overtaken by its talkiness, claustrophobia, and polarized morality.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Carefully re-creates the first movie's lightweight romance and mildly cheeky gender comedy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Paul Giamatti steals the picture as a sardonic grifter with a phobic terror of dirty toilet seats.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Mostly the three comics stick to the Bill Cosby formula, dispensing with racial anger in favor of good-natured and family- and relationship-based crossover material.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Though it's aimed at preschoolers, it's tuneful and funny enough to amuse any adult.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Never lives up to the hilarity of the opening, partly because the large-scale production smothers the gags but mostly because those gags are so easy to smother.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The comedy sci-fi franchise returns after a ten-year hiatus, with the same formula of respectably funny wisecracks and obsessively detailed space monsters.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Cheerful mess of a pulp-fiction parody.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    There are no big surprises, but Mac and director Charles Stone III (Drumline) hit all the right dramatic notes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Less about the characters than about the first two movies, whose best scenes it congeals into ritual or parody.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Debutant director Richard Day, a seasoned TV producer, delivers a steady stream of cheerful vulgarity and a few clever gags.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Fans of Coppola's movies (and/or perfume ads) will find this free of the absurd pop-rock flourishes in "Antoinette" and more consistent with the skilled tonality and narrative ambiguity of "Translation."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    With its diabolical ending, this is the movie equivalent of a crossword puzzle: fun, clever, and disposable.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The tag here is more silly than haunting, but this is still a pretty wild ride, with a fine, knife-wielding score by Bennett Salvay.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This British drama is so overplotted it smothers the two main characters as much as they do each other.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    By accident or design, the resolution here is morally ambiguous and vaguely distasteful, which may be the reason I liked it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The cultural cock-strutting gets to be a bit much, but Neville handily captures the excitement of an art scene percolating, breaking wide open, and finally burning itself out.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Making Shakur the narrator works pretty well at first...But once he becomes an overnight star at age 20, his relentless self-articulation to Tabitha Soren begins to sound like the usual white noise of celebrity, his ideas about race and power in America potent but undeveloped.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Singer draws heavily on the 1978 hit that launched the Warner Brothers franchise, with Brandon Routh dully impersonating Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel, Kevin Spacey getting all the good lines as the villainous Lex Luthor, and stock footage of Marlon Brando proving that death isn't always a good career move.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The fun hardens into Fun after he's (Mr. Incredible) lured out of retirement and imprisoned in a remote island compound, though the sleek computer animation is spellbinding as usual.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    I guessed the big plot twist as soon as Franklin began setting it up, which gave me a good 40 minutes to appreciate the fine supporting cast and weathered coastal Florida locations while waiting for Washington's character to catch up with me.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Passably creepy chiller.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This has its sappy moments, but both women give wonderfully detailed performances, aided by Michael Learned as Hunt's mother and Chris Sarandon as the calm, cold minister.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Patrick Dempsey and Michelle Monaghan make an agreeable pair in this above-average comedy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Larry Doyle and John Hamburg's script is full of holes, but this is still pretty damn funny--thanks mostly to Barrymore, who seems to be retracing Lucille Ball's trajectory from sex kitten to comedienne.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The movie is fairly entertaining, but the high production values and shticky humor invert the dynamic of the show, which was played totally straight despite the fact that the sets were always threatening to fall down.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The key scene -- is typical of the film's fanciful narrative approach but also its grating pretentiousness.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Martial arts hero Jet Li takes on all comers--with one hand in his hip pocket most of the time--in this absurd but breathlessly paced actioner.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The drama is hampered by a vague screenplay that takes its sweet time explaining the characters' past and never specifies the nature of the boy's palsy and apparent retardation.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The formula works just fine on a more modest scale, without having to carry all the glittering casino sets and A-list movie stars.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The auction makes for a pretty good hinge between the two narratives and, more importantly, allows Madonna to indulge her fetish for fine English things.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Pleasantly acted and moderately funny, but it lacks the genuine bile that made "Heathers" (1987) so bracing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Like Nicole Holofcener's "Please Give" (2010), this turns on the friction between an unusually altruistic character and the self-centered people around him, though screenwriters David Schisgall and Evgenia Peretz never pursue their premise into the sort of moral comedy that so distinguished the other movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    You'd have to be a real curmudgeon not to enjoy a show with Ruth Brown, Mavis Staples, Solomon Burke...
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Americans desensitized to senseless violence may find the subject matter almost banal, and the interspersed news footage of armed conflict from around the world feels like a rhetorical device. But the coldly telegraphic structure--a series of 71 blackouts following the four strangers to their deaths--yields some striking moments.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Clooney badly botches the spy plot by casting himself as Barris's agency contact... and a truly awful Julia Roberts as Barris's Mata Hari lover (she's soundly upstaged by Drew Barrymore as his devoted girlfriend). Yet the mounting delirium drives home Kaufman's basic point: that a shadow government rules by bread and circuses.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Seriously uneven but often charming.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Pegg has some good obnoxious moments, but he's only a few movies away from becoming Dudley Moore.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    As contrived as this premise may sound (and it isn't much better on-screen), writer-director Mora Stephens manages to push the odd-couple story in some interesting directions.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Scripted by Pitre and his wife, Michelle Benoit, this is more interesting for its historical setting than for its rather wooden drama, but Tim Curry gives a pretty good performance as the town's whiskey priest.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The Holocaust subplot is contrived and schematic. Yet the central love triangle is fairly compelling, aided by Krol's fine performance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The talented cast--manages to rescue the movie as well as the earth.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The film's opening and closing moments are weirdly reminiscent of "Black Hawk Down," another tale of Western soldiers in over their heads on the dark continent -- clearly no one these days understands manifest destiny.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Well-meaning but simpleminded biopic.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    In the end, this admirably broadens our knowledge of the era but doesn't much deepen it.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Long, heavy, and not particularly edifying Holocaust drama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This uninspired comedy drama seems to have been bankrolled by the state tourism board, yet the Celtic music sequences provide welcome relief from the reheated plot.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    As one might expect from IFC, actors and directors dominate the interview segments, which may be the reason the narrative never finds its way to Heaven's Gate.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The documentary becomes more poignant and substantial when old age begins to seriously disable some of the dancers.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Director Bob Clark teamed with nostalgic humorist Jean Shepherd for this squeaky clean and often quite funny 1983 yuletide comedy, adapted from Shepherd's novel In God We Trust: All Others Pay Cash.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Perry's soap opera story lines are awful, with their nobly suffering sistas, gorgeous do-right men, and shamelessly materialistic dream endings. But the movie's message of gospel joy and racial pride couldn't be more sincere, and Perry gives an impeccable comic performance as the title character.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Like the earlier film, this one has an airless quality, much of the action taking place in the hushed and colorless offices of "the Circus." But whereas the dank tone of "Let the Right One In" served to heighten the moments of poignance and shrieking horror, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy begins to seem phlegmatic after a while.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The jokes all revolve around weed, stereotypes, and Neil Patrick Harris; the stereotype stuff is by far the funniest.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Whenever writer-director Oren Moverman moves past these scattered and admittedly voyeuristic moments into the lives of the two soldiers, the movie drifts into received wisdom and unconvincing romance.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Highly recommended if you want to watch an assortment of rich movie stars feel your pain.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Terence Stamp and Wallace Shawn spend a fair amount of time skulking around as ghostly servants, which kept me amused for the movie's 99 minutes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This absorbing documentary by George Hickenlooper (Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse) spends too much time on the celebrities in Bingenheimer's life for its analysis of fame and fandom to rise above the banal.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This is supposed to be a testament to the nation's diversity, but it's so complacent that you'd never imagine said diversity is one of the greatest social challenges of the new century.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The movie gets old fast--mostly because it’s bringing up the rear after "Undercover Brother" (2002) And "I’m Gonna Git You Sucka" (1988). But the kung-fu climax at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue (“the Honky House”) is nearly worth the wait, and Adrian Younge’s score, with its moody horns, is a perfect snapshot of early 70s soul.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The battle scenes are bloody, visceral, and expertly edited, though arterial spray consumes so much screen time that the numerous subplots, involving 11 legendary Siamese defenders well-known to Thais, may feel perfunctory to Westerners despite some strong performances.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The leads are good, and Timothy Hutton is memorably off-putting as the pitcher's disengaged dad. But having created the aching umpire, Ponsoldt occupies him with some fairly shopworn situations.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Director Roger Michell seems genuinely taken with the contrast between brotherly love and homosexual obsession, but these themes are overwhelmed by the suspense machinery.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The romantic denouement is so predictable it must have driven the animators mad as they worked, but their modest art is eerily effective.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The conflict between Hawn, who prizes her freedom, and Sarandon, who values her family, is pretty rich; it reminded me of the friendship between Shirley MacLaine and Anne Bancroft in "The Turning Point."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Fans will dig the abundant performance video and commentary from Henry Rollins and Ian MacKaye; everyone else should steer clear of the mosh pit.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    As usual, Sayles's dialogue scenes are as shapely as blown glass, but none of the characters' predicaments has been adequately explored, much less resolved, when the final freeze-frame arrives.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    When the movie got serious again at the end I wasn't buying, though the whole endeavor is helped along by an appealing cast.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    As in the other two movies, the plot is a thin cardboard box used to carry an assortment of observational doughnuts--in this case, estrogen-fueled shop talk about race, men, and the politics of looking good.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    An unexpectedly troubling crime thriller.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Reasonably entertaining if utterly familiar entry in the long-running SF franchise.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    I came to this expecting a standard rock doc, but its cobwebbed tale of an aged parent and grown child's debilitating relationship seems closer to "Grey Gardens."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Like the former first lady, the filmmakers go slightly overboard.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Favors character development over rude scares, though given the narrow parameters of the genre, it's not really a worthwhile trade.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Silly but enjoyable drama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The episodic structure prevents any real momentum, but Byatt and Fothergill give a visceral sense of the sea's violence and vividly capture the riot of color to be found on the ocean floor.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Unfortunately the film never establishes either a perspective of its own or a coherent geography of the city, so the politicians pontificating at ceremonies and architects commiserating at building sites become deadly dull long before the the film exhausts its 88 minutes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Gilbert would have done well to stick with these witnesses; instead his History Channel-type video presents a dutiful overview of the Brown case.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Kids who are still subject to the slings and arrows of high school will find this a lot funnier than I did, though I did get a bang out of Kal Penn, Kevin Christy, and Kenan Thompson as Cannon's car-crazy pals.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The absence of any moral center makes this a bitter pill.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    It's a hokey heart-warmer that works.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Often seems like a Mike Leigh movie viewed in a fun-house mirror.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Shepard is the whole show here, as weathered and elemental as the harsh Bolivian locations; the movie's best scenes are those that pit him against Stephen Rea as a former Pinkerton man who tracked the outlaws for years and can't believe Cassidy is still drawing breath.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Outlandish but gripping paranoid thriller.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    There aren't any big laughs, but there's a steady supply of small ones, and with his overgrown-kid persona Ferrell seems more comfortable in a family comedy than, say, Eddie Murphy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Shot at the same time as "The Matrix Reloaded," this last installment is the shortest of the bunch at 129 minutes, but I still succumbed to special-effects hypnosis in the last hour.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Director Anne Sewitsky aims for quirky humanism along the lines of Finland's Aki Kaurismaki; she's helped along considerably by Kittelsen's sunny performance, though the film crosses over into Scandinavian kitsch with a series of country-swing interludes sung a capella by a male quartet.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Winterbottom and screenwriter Tony Grisoni were clearly motivated by conscience, but I can't help thinking that Stephen Frears's "Dirty Pretty Things," a much more conventional and contrived movie about third-world refugees, will have a greater social impact than this murky art-house item.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This sequel ups the ante, asking whether urban renewal means anything now other than turning neighborhoods into giant malls.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The project was produced in association with National Geographic World Films, a relationship borne out by the movie's cultural detail, rich earth-toned cinematography (by Falorni), and almost complete lack of dramatic tension.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Though the film lacks the frantic imagination of its inspiration, Robert Rodriguez's "Spy Kids" franchise, grade-schoolers should still enjoy its fresh-scrubbed humor and fantasies of youthful omnipotence.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    With a mug like hers Cervera must have realized this was her big chance to star in a musical, and she gives a dazzling performance.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The tone seesaws between comic wackiness and romantic sincerity, with Paltrow better suited to the latter.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Seriously gruesome docudrama.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This French variation on the backwoods horror movie proves that even a little thematic complexity in the early scenes can yield a substantial payoff when things get going.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Producer-star Tom Cruise handed this one to alumni from the TV spy drama "Alias," and the result is nearly as good as the series' best, Woo's Mission: Impossible 2.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This Argentinean comedy is short on plot and leisurely in its character development, though by the end it's become a modest and genial portrait of a dysfunctional family.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This downbeat indie drama gives the leads a few excellent scenes together, and they acquit themselves credibly. But there's also a fair amount of wilted comedy from the stock supporting characters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Aside from the Pirandellian games and some interplay of different film stocks there isn't much going on here, though von Trier rewards the patient with a strange and horrifying climax.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The movie gets off to a weak start, but the jokes get progressively more bent.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This pleasant romantic comedy is essentially "Far From Heaven" with the races reversed.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Roth puts a sardonic spin on the puritanism of the 80s slasher.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This French biopic of Nicolas Sarkozy plays like a competent TV miniseries, moving briskly and focusing on the hustle and bustle of electoral politics as the protagonist climbs toward the presidency.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Gets a little soapy, but the dismal working-class milieu and the measured performances by Mezzogiorno and Girotti (a venerable Italian actor who died last year ) bolster the sense of solidity.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Though it easily surpasses most American action flicks, it suffers from the old commercial imperative of making the protagonist a nice guy, something Refn has seldom bothered with in Europe.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    There are plenty of funny moments, as well as a sweet subplot involving the unkempt drummer and the guitarist's no-nonsense mom (Christina Applegate).
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    For a kids' picture this is relatively funny.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This doomsday scenario takes up the first third of the movie, after which the tension dissipates badly and the husband and wife, now separated by plastic sheeting, wait for help to arrive.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Broomfield, whose celebrity exposés are known for their intrusiveness and innuendo, lost me with his gentle shower scene between an Iraqi woman and her husband; even if it wasn't invented, is it really any of our business?
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Fortunately for the company, Largo turns out to be a formidable knife fighter in the corporate sense; fortunately for this sleek, empty thriller, he turns out to be a formidable knife fighter in the street sense too.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Whether or not she's alive is the question that's supposed to animate this ostensibly metaphysical horror movie, but thematic rigor mortis sets in long before the final reel.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Whether the character is supposed to be a stand-in for Cody, who grew up in the western 'burbs of Chicago and has since won an Oscar, is more than I can say, but the movie suffers from the sort of self-pitying fog that can envelop a writer when he dives into his own malaise.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Glodell seems to be reaching for the nihilistic buddy romance of a movie like "Mean Streets" (1973), but without the serious intent; despite all the roiling emotions, this begins to feel like a pile-up of macho fetish items and stylistic affectations.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The argument is so tilted against windmills (sorry) that this comes perilously close to an advocacy video. But Israel deserves credit for delivering the bad news that wind power, like natural gas and nuclear, comes with its own array of social and environmental headaches.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Unfortunately, as in many such big-screen comic books, the backstory beats the hell out of the present-tense plot.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The famously passive-aggressive musicians manage to keep any real drama offscreen; the overriding impression is of four people enduring each other long enough to get their retirement portfolios in order.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    W.
    It's most entertaining for its stunt casting of movie stars as the president's family and advisers.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The characters quickly succumb to stereotype.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    First-time director James Gartner observes all the rituals--the coach busting chops, the team sneaking out to party--but the players are indifferently characterized and the civil rights story has a fake Black History Month feel.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Director Paul Greengrass has applied his jumpy, tumbling visual style to action blockbusters with Matt Damon and serious dramatizations of political events. This Iraq war drama makes a game attempt to meld the two, though manufacturing thrills takes precedence over any kind of journalistic insight.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    All I got was this lousy movie. OK, it's not that bad, though in contrast to "Ocean's Eleven," which gave its megastars a neat little heist story, this sequel is both contrived and convoluted.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Samberg can't carry this, though director Akiva Schaffer supplies some hilarious, "Jackass"-style wipeouts and there are nice supporting turns from Isla Fisher (Wedding Crashers) as Rod's love interest and Bill Hader as one of his goofball friends.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    His story demands to be heard, though Tucker and Epperlein lack the material for a full feature and pad this out to 73 minutes with some incongruously playful elements (spy music, comic-book illustrations, scenes of Abbas frolicking at a beach).
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Pine, who expertly approximated William Shatner in the Star Trek reboot, seems to have picked up some of the actor's air of self-serious buffoonery, and it suits him well; as Witherspoon's best pal, late-night TV comedian Chelsea Handler holds down what might be called the Nora Ephron part, dispensing an endless stream of bawdy man jokes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The scenes between husband and wife are spectacularly awkward and arresting, though the movie grows more dubious the nearer the guys get to their shooting session in a local hotel room.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Dumb but harmless live-action comedy for kids.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The problem is that only a fan would be inclined to tolerate this dunderheaded mystery.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This is a killer idea for a political satire, and screenwriters Jason Richman and Joshua Michael Stern come close to realizing its farcical potential.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Adults won't find much to enjoy here, though the dog's high-octane action series serves as a perverse parody of Jerry Bruckheimer-style summer blockbusters.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Former FBI agent Robert Hanssen is now serving a life sentence for his long career as a Russian and Soviet spy, but this rote thriller implies he should have done prison time just for being Catholic. As played by Chris Cooper, Hanssen is a humorless asshole who commits treason because the bureau won't give him an office with a window, and the screenplay scores countless easy points off his religiosity, which masks a weakness for sex tapes and sleazy chat rooms.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    3
    Tykwer manages to negotiate this incredible coincidence without much trouble, though the movie slows to a crawl in its second half.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The gilt-and-grime setting is eerily atmospheric, and screenwriter Dan Madigan has a nicely sick sense of humor.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    It runs like a Swiss watch, though the plot continuously turns on Cage's liberal interpretation of ridiculously cryptic clues.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Most of the humor is of the kick-daddy-in-the-shins variety, though Anjelica Huston has a few choice moments as "Ms. Harridan."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This screen adaptation never quite jells, veering from family drama to stale 50s consumer kitsch, but it's anchored by strong performances from Julianne Moore.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The first positive portrayal of homosexuality in Russian cinema, a distinction that carries it only so far.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The true story of Kimani N'gan'ga Maruge, an 84-year-old Kenyan who entered primary school in hope of learning to read, inspired this pleasant but routine exercise in third-world uplift.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Sluggish comedy drama.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Like so many secular, big-studio Christmas comedies, this isn't naughty enough to be funny or nice enough to be uplifting; it's just an ugly sweater from a distant relative, thoughtlessly sent and destined to be thrown away.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Alexander Payne has won an Oscar for best adapted screenplay (Sideways), but you'd never guess that from this clumsily written drama: characters keep explaining things that their listeners would already know, and the first couple reels are so thick with expository voice-over that you may think you're listening to a museum tour on a set of headphones.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    An innocuous, passably entertaining effects extravaganza.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    For the grown-ups there are sweet, sincere performances by Ginnifer Goodwin, Sandra Oh, and, as Ramona's endlessly game father, the likable John Corbett, relieved for once of his drippy rom-com duties.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This is mildly entertaining for its cheery sacrilege (crucifixes that turn into throwing stars, etc), but once the premise has been rolled out, the movie is about as surprising to watch as the Stations of the Cross.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Elf
    The film is soon bogged down by fake hugs and a faker climax.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    "The Illusionist" also centers on a 19th-century magician, and the elegant contours of its story are even more impressive compared with Nolan's clutter of double and triple crosses.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The vile sadism of the Saw movies has been replaced by decorative references to Saint Augustine and Immanuel Kant, and there's a beautiful but brainy police profiler (Waddell) on hand to dispense a thick layer of psychobabble.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    By the time Herzog tried to pass off jellyfish as Dourif's old pals, my indulgence was nearing its end--but then so was the movie.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This manages to make the real seem generic, rather than the other way around.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The movie seems unusually honest in portraying the no-option existence of the working poor, but the story slips into melodrama in the last reel.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    It preserves the peculiar machismo of Ayer's earlier projects: the alpha male dominates not only because he's the most powerful, but because he's the most jaded.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This singing-along-to-the-radio effect has a dingy charm that honors the blue-collar Italian setting, yet Turturro spoils it by turning the movie into a hip star party, with a cast of indie-acting royalty.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    I love Franken and wish there were more funny liberals in the chattering class, but his crushing sarcasm wouldn't exactly elevate the national debate.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Agreeable but overlong.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Surrounding and ultimately subsuming this ethical struggle is a fair amount of pediatric-cancer horror and mush, though Cassavetes is frequently bailed out by his cast (Diaz is admirably unpleasant as the controlling mother, and Joan Cusack is unusually tough and restrained as the presiding judge).
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This story of a girl growing up in the occupied territories never finds its footing.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This is pretty thin soup, but the players are spirited and the jokes generally offbeat.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    No movie with access to the Cole Porter songbook could be a complete waste of time, but this biopic of the great tunesmith by producer-director Irwin Winkler is all upholstery and no chair.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This revisionist western by writer-director Andrew Dominik makes a wan attempt to present the Jesse James legend as the dawn of celebrity culture in America.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    I hate to rap this serious-minded filmmaker, but I'm beginning to wonder whether her scripts aren't better realized when they're held in check.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Watchable exercise in Zen hokum.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Weird anachronisms (cars, telephones, home computers) contribute to the craziness, but despite the copious imagination on display, this is a fairly long haul.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Canned racial uplift and tear-streaked faces abound, though they're offset somewhat by a nicely funky blaxploitation vibe.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    This is the usual cartoon of hound dogs, roadhouses, antebellum mansions, and Civil War reenactments. Aside from that, it's not a bad date movie.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Only loosely connected to the story, the visuals quickly grow monotonous, and as the chronicle arrives at Cobain's late years of curdled fame and fortune, his bitterness and cynicism make even the narration hard to take.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Pederson has no smoking gun that connects Nashi to dirty tricks or violence, but there are plenty of both swirling around Moscow.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    You don't have to get too far into Kazuo Ishiguro's brilliant 2005 novel Never Let Me Go to realize it's hopelessly unfilmable.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The setup for this Oliver Stone drama keeps its iconic villain so far removed from the financial action that he seems like a dog tied up outside a restaurant.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The behind-the-scenes tragedy gives Gilliam an easy excuse for the dull chaos that engulfs the story, but he might have generated it all on his own.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The movie lapses into a listless romantic triangle.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Sublimely stupid.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Zemeckis captures all the story’s terror, but its pathos has always been the real challenge, and it mostly eludes him.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Bong's opening and climactic scenes, in which the old woman bops around to a dance tune amid a vast field of yellow grass, are typical of the movie's cockeyed poetry.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    In these dusty American settings, the wistful melancholy of Wong's earlier movies seems fairly contrived.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Poor distribution doomed the original movie, though Romero has stuck around long enough to serve as executive producer of this respectable update by Breck Eisner.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The movie's studied tranquillity will appeal to some, though its embrace of traditional village life struck me as self-satisfied to the point of smugness.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Cox and three others have produced a swift and economical script, but it's just porn with a different money shot--not graphic violence per se but the sort of blood-soaked crime scene that sells true-crime paperbacks.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    As a romantic comedy this is a cut above the norm, satirical in its treatment of both spiritually bereft New Yorkers and materialistic Indian immigrants.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Tasteful, unremarkable art-house fare, rescued from complete irrelevance by Stephen Dillane's bottled-up performance as a writer scarred by the Holocaust.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Proves that a movie can be true to life and still seem utterly preposterous.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    McAdams is typically effervescent here, but she can't rescue this weak comedy from a wooden Ford, whose stick-up-the-ass character is unimaginatively goosed by screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Washes onto the big screen with a tide of weak one-liners, exaggerated reactions, and vaguely nauseating gags.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The gentle Wood isn't very convincing as a bare-knuckle brawler (which bodes ill for his forthcoming role as Iggy Pop), and the movie settles into a payback soap opera reminiscent of "West Side Story."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Watchable but not very gripping. Patricia Clarkson does her best with an underwritten part as the young man's terminally ill mother, and British actor Ken Stott is excellent as the grieving husband she leaves behind.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Director Brian De Palma will probably take the rap for this tepid noir, but the real culprits are Josh Hartnett and Scarlett Johansson, red-hot lovers in life but (as ever) gorgeous stiffs on-screen.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Michael Mann was one of the producers, and his daughter Ami Canaan Mann directed; a couple more Manns fill out the credits, which makes you wonder why they couldn't just have a nice picnic and softball game at a state park somewhere.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The real problem, however, is the male protagonist and his foul inner life: Almodovar's impressive recent work has focused on the rich emotionality of women, and though the film provides an interesting take on gender and submission, this sort of nastiness just isn't his thing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Eastwood is still a primal force on-screen, but his unusual practice of shooting scripts as written, which served him well on "Unforgiven" and "Million Dollar Baby," here leaves him exposed to Nick Schenk's familiar situations and awkward dialogue.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Not having read the Richler novel, I can't comment on the movie's fidelity to it, but this has the overstuffed feel of a sprawling, life-spanning story that's been wrestled down to feature length.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    The genre shows serious signs of wear in this needlessly fictionalized feature about Vince Papale.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Despite the two-hours-plus running time, major plot developments like the actual escape and the eventual departure of Colin Farrell's hardened Stalinist flit by so quickly that they barely register.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Mike White contributed to the script, and though he shares with the Hesses an innocence that can be both sweet and slightly grotesque (e.g., Chuck and Buck), his influence is most evident here in the conventional plotting.

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