For 1,481 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J.R. Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 The Secret of the Grain
Lowest review score: 0 Saw II
Score distribution:
1481 movie reviews
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    A vicious, incoherent shoot-'em-up.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Simpleminded indictment of every senator who voted "yea."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    With no personalities established and nothing at stake, it's no more interesting than a pickup game on your local court.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Feeble exercise in brain-teaser noir.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    This sequel to "Fantastic Four" (2005) drags in the Silver Surfer, who looks like a gigantic hood ornament and, given voice by Laurence Fishburne, has about as much personality.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Pretentious and overconceived, the movie purports to celebrate self-determination yet squashes it at every turn.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    The resulting movie (2005) covers seven years and touches on some of the same social issues that gave "Hoop Dreams" its epic sweep, yet Serrill fails to treat any of them adequately, and the narrative loses its shape as events unfold.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Like Robert Altman's "M*A*S*H" this has a banquet scene posed like The Last Supper, but the basic idea--toothless satire trimming a dull star party--reminded me more of "Ready to Wear."
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Cruise and Diaz have worked together before (in Vanilla Sky), but this is their first summer-movie pairing, and their star qualities are so similar--dazzling looks, good comedic chops, complete emotional vacuity--that together, instead of romantic chemistry they generate a sort of giddy, blinding falseness.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    The movie's notion of humor is exemplified by Bradshaw's extended nude scene, which might be termed "roughing the viewer."
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Director Taylor Hackford ("Ray") seems to be aiming for a big "Boogie Nights" social canvas, though the movie's risible prize-fight sequence is more reminiscent of the later "Rocky" sequels.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Pure punishment, this rote action flick from Australia.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    The laughs and emotional moments are so weak that director Jonas Elmer has no choice but to tweak them with music cues and bland guitar-rock.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Unfortunately, this is one of those movies with a twist ending that turns a character inside out, revealing earlier scenes to be essentially fraudulent and more or less invalidating one's emotional investment in the story. No one ever walked out of a Hitchcock movie feeling as cheated as this made me feel.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    I missed the first half hour of this Zorro adventure, and it's a tribute to the idiot-proof screenplay that I had no trouble following the rest.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    These ideas may well have cohered in Chuck Palahniuk's best-selling satirical novel, which I haven't read, but in this screen adaptation by writer-director Clark Gregg they seem more like an assortment of gimmicks.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    The young sweethearts amuse themselves by donning steampunk outfits and crashing the funerals of dead children, which may seem quirky and sweet if you can disregard the awful grief of such gatherings; the problem is that, once you manage this, the main characters' grief doesn't register either.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    A tedious movie about excitement.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Perelman never overcomes the disjuncture of having two familiar actresses play the same grown character, and despite the endless crosscutting, the two halves settle respectively into ghoulish foreboding and murky psychological drama.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Grazer's writing team has filled up the film's 82 minutes with winking product placements, SNL-type goofs, PG gags premised on not quite cursing, a Smashmouth cover of the Beatles' "Getting Better," and a lame subplot about a scuzzy lothario (Stephen Baldwin).
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Having defused the fairy tale, first-time screenwriter Leigh Dunlap pads this out to 96 minutes with stale high school politics and the usual claptrap about believing in yourself.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    This remake takes an alternate tack from the original feature, expanding the story of "The Sitter" to a full 83 minutes, but the result is dull and painfully generic.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Suzuki and Kaneshiro keep the first hour afloat with their easy comic interplay, but Yamazaki badly needs editing: the opening escape sequence is needlessly repeated later, and a slow drip of false endings drags this out to a tiring 118 minutes.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    A flimsy setup dooms this from the start, though its sheer awfulness is something to see.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    It's a great premise for comedy, but this thing is too dumb to do it justice.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    The cinematic debut of Chicago theater director Marc Rosenbush, this 2004 indie comedy is an irritating exercise in ham acting, metaphysical patter routines, and rim-shot-style comic editing.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Director Steve Carr continues his streak of numbingly mediocre family comedies.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Tends toward arch silliness more than actual humor, a formula that's tolerable enough in 15-minute tube installments but deadly dull in this 86-minute feature.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    Watching Allen fart out a story when he has no characters is always painful, as people are defined through clumsy expository dialogue and ranked according to their cultural accomplishments. But the script here is lazy even by his standards.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    The narrative emphasizes how much danger Spurlock is in and how noble he is to embark on all this while his wife is back in the U.S. expecting their first child; it's a little insulting to all the real reporters who've died in the field looking for hard information, not weak indie comedy.

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