For 1,480 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J.R. Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Palindromes
Lowest review score: 0 Suddenly
Score distribution:
1480 movie reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The movie is fairly entertaining, but the high production values and shticky humor invert the dynamic of the show, which was played totally straight despite the fact that the sets were always threatening to fall down.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The key scene -- is typical of the film's fanciful narrative approach but also its grating pretentiousness.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Martial arts hero Jet Li takes on all comers--with one hand in his hip pocket most of the time--in this absurd but breathlessly paced actioner.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The drama is hampered by a vague screenplay that takes its sweet time explaining the characters' past and never specifies the nature of the boy's palsy and apparent retardation.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The formula works just fine on a more modest scale, without having to carry all the glittering casino sets and A-list movie stars.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The auction makes for a pretty good hinge between the two narratives and, more importantly, allows Madonna to indulge her fetish for fine English things.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Pleasantly acted and moderately funny, but it lacks the genuine bile that made "Heathers" (1987) so bracing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Like Nicole Holofcener's "Please Give" (2010), this turns on the friction between an unusually altruistic character and the self-centered people around him, though screenwriters David Schisgall and Evgenia Peretz never pursue their premise into the sort of moral comedy that so distinguished the other movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    You'd have to be a real curmudgeon not to enjoy a show with Ruth Brown, Mavis Staples, Solomon Burke...
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Americans desensitized to senseless violence may find the subject matter almost banal, and the interspersed news footage of armed conflict from around the world feels like a rhetorical device. But the coldly telegraphic structure--a series of 71 blackouts following the four strangers to their deaths--yields some striking moments.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Clooney badly botches the spy plot by casting himself as Barris's agency contact... and a truly awful Julia Roberts as Barris's Mata Hari lover (she's soundly upstaged by Drew Barrymore as his devoted girlfriend). Yet the mounting delirium drives home Kaufman's basic point: that a shadow government rules by bread and circuses.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Seriously uneven but often charming.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Pegg has some good obnoxious moments, but he's only a few movies away from becoming Dudley Moore.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    As contrived as this premise may sound (and it isn't much better on-screen), writer-director Mora Stephens manages to push the odd-couple story in some interesting directions.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Scripted by Pitre and his wife, Michelle Benoit, this is more interesting for its historical setting than for its rather wooden drama, but Tim Curry gives a pretty good performance as the town's whiskey priest.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The Holocaust subplot is contrived and schematic. Yet the central love triangle is fairly compelling, aided by Krol's fine performance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The talented cast--manages to rescue the movie as well as the earth.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The film's opening and closing moments are weirdly reminiscent of "Black Hawk Down," another tale of Western soldiers in over their heads on the dark continent -- clearly no one these days understands manifest destiny.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Well-meaning but simpleminded biopic.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    In the end, this admirably broadens our knowledge of the era but doesn't much deepen it.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Long, heavy, and not particularly edifying Holocaust drama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    This uninspired comedy drama seems to have been bankrolled by the state tourism board, yet the Celtic music sequences provide welcome relief from the reheated plot.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    As one might expect from IFC, actors and directors dominate the interview segments, which may be the reason the narrative never finds its way to Heaven's Gate.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The documentary becomes more poignant and substantial when old age begins to seriously disable some of the dancers.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Director Bob Clark teamed with nostalgic humorist Jean Shepherd for this squeaky clean and often quite funny 1983 yuletide comedy, adapted from Shepherd's novel In God We Trust: All Others Pay Cash.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Perry's soap opera story lines are awful, with their nobly suffering sistas, gorgeous do-right men, and shamelessly materialistic dream endings. But the movie's message of gospel joy and racial pride couldn't be more sincere, and Perry gives an impeccable comic performance as the title character.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Like the earlier film, this one has an airless quality, much of the action taking place in the hushed and colorless offices of "the Circus." But whereas the dank tone of "Let the Right One In" served to heighten the moments of poignance and shrieking horror, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy begins to seem phlegmatic after a while.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    The jokes all revolve around weed, stereotypes, and Neil Patrick Harris; the stereotype stuff is by far the funniest.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Whenever writer-director Oren Moverman moves past these scattered and admittedly voyeuristic moments into the lives of the two soldiers, the movie drifts into received wisdom and unconvincing romance.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Highly recommended if you want to watch an assortment of rich movie stars feel your pain.

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