For 1,481 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J.R. Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Once
Lowest review score: 0 The Quiet
Score distribution:
1481 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    You know you're in for a hard-core art film when you hear more people raving about its opening shot than the movie itself.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The language has been changed to English, of course, which is the only real reason this movie exists; the story development, desolate tone, and key set pieces are mostly copied from the original movie, which in turn was based on a novel by John Ajvide Lindqvist.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 J.R. Jones
    Bong's opening and climactic scenes, in which the old woman bops around to a dance tune amid a vast field of yellow grass, are typical of the movie's cockeyed poetry.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    By focusing on Strummer and giving a fair amount of screen time to his years in the wilderness before and after the Clash, Temple arrives at a more poignant and mature statement of what this committed band was all about.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    The grand architecture of Milan and the icy rhythms of composer John Adams set the tone for this elegant Italian drama about the suffocating power of family, wealth, and tradition.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The same virtue doesn't apply to his commentary, which is too general to rise above the pedestrian; the movie works best traveling from the eye straight to the conscience.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The black/white duality isn't terribly interesting, but as in most of Aronofsky's films, an intense horror of the body and its uncontrollability fuels the rhapsodic psychodrama.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    Though it easily surpasses most American action flicks, it suffers from the old commercial imperative of making the protagonist a nice guy, something Refn has seldom bothered with in Europe.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This sequel to the apocalyptic splatter flick "28 Days Later" . . . (2002) is still well equipped to rip your face off.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The immersive quality of 3-D is particularly well suited to undersea documentaries, and this one, directed by Howard Hall ("Into the Deep"), offers a close-up look at such fantastic creatures as the fried egg jellyfish, the mantis shrimp, the sand tiger shark, and the thuggish wolf eel.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    It's a fascinating cultural artifact and a stomping good time.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 J.R. Jones
    You'd have to be a real curmudgeon not to enjoy a show with Ruth Brown, Mavis Staples, Solomon Burke...
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Bujalski has a knack for the genuine moment.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This 2005 feature is demanding to say the least, but its pulse-slowing rhythms leave a real sense of peace.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 J.R. Jones
    Holofcener's work is often classified as comedy of manners, but at her best she trades in something much more resonant--the comedy of mores. Here she dives into the fascinating matter of why some people impulsively give and others compulsively take, and how people are taught to second-guess and quash their own generous impulses.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 J.R. Jones
    An impressive mix of entertainment and social comment, spinning a great mystery even as it confronts an ugly world.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Strange, unpredictable, and sometimes magical.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Fleet, gripping documentary.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The mesmerizing narrative recounts a media circus of unrivaled malignance.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Jensen's dramatic structure is so visible this sometimes seems like a late Rod Serling teleplay, but Bier has proved highly adept at merging conventional drama with the immediacy of the Dogma 95 movement.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 30 J.R. Jones
    The script, by Nolan and his brother Jonathan, takes a few vague pokes at Wall Street and the financial elite but mainly revives the ponderous psychodrama of the first movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Set in the blue gray gloom of industrial China, this cunning noir focuses on two ruthless coal miners.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    A beguiling combination of agrarian ode and “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test,” deepened by Peterson's square sincerity as he struggles to find himself in relation to his family's land.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Here the idea of sleep as the ultimate threat is still fresh and marvelously insidious, and Craven vitalizes the nightmare sequences with assorted surrealist novelties.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    The movie might have amounted to no more than a sunny eco-parable, but it begins to bite harder when the catadores, captivated by their sudden importance, face the unhappy prospect of returning to their previous existence.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    But like much of Herzog's work, it's essentially apolitical, focusing on a man at war with his environment -- and no one plunges into the foliage like he does.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This absorbing PBS-style documentary by Joseph Dorman follows Aleichem from his early years in the Russian shtetl of Voronko through the pogroms that would drive the Jewish diaspora of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    Grimly mesmerizing saga.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    On paper this may sound like soap opera, but Bier and screenwriter Anders Thomas Jensen (Mifune) have a good feel for character, and they're aided by a fine cast.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 J.R. Jones
    This is a polished, palatable intrigue, with a knockout performance from Olivia Williams as the PM's hardened wife and a highly persuasive one from Kim Cattrall, cast against type as his buttoned-up personal assistant. But the mystery is unraveled a bit too conveniently.

Top Trailers