For 1,480 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

J.R. Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Atonement
Lowest review score: 0 Alone in the Dark
Score distribution:
1,480 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Robert Duvall, who played a similar character in Bruce Beresford's "Tender Mercies" (1983), turns up in a supporting role.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The movie is perfectly appropriate for girls, and its opening scenes play like a more intelligent and historically grounded version of their G-rated princess dramas.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    There’s no denying this is a coldly commanding tale in which Haneke’s signature obsessions--bourgeois control, sexual repression, emotional cruelty, cathartic violence--simmer quietly as subtext before bursting into the open in the final reels.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The climax, in which the detective's commanding officer gives him a dictionary and subjects him to a sort of linguistic browbeating, is a marvel of dead air and unspoken oppression.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Ronald Bronstein, who wrote and directed the disquieting indie Frownland, steps in front of the cameras for this similarly lo-fi drama, and his loose-limbed performance as the brash, irresponsible father of two young boys establishes him as a genuine triple threat.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Some have compared this French crime drama to "The Godfather," and though that may be a common critical touchstone, writer-director Jacques Audiard manages to replicate its most elusive element, not the dark comedy or the operatic bloodletting but the incremental corruption of a decent man into a willful, coldhearted killer.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    It's eminently suitable for children, fully inhabiting their world and finding real laughs there without resorting to sentiment, condescension, or snarky in-jokes for the adults.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Even in its sanitized state, this movie about the generational revolt that reinvigorated Disney’s animation department in the 1980s and ’90s is fascinating, thick with studio intrigue and lavishly illustrated with archival sketches and test animations.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Sitting in the theater, you're liable to buy all this simply for the pleasure of watching Caine work. Like Eastwood and other actors of his vintage, Caine brings to the project not only his own formidable skills but more than half a century of movie history.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Here the idea of sleep as the ultimate threat is still fresh and marvelously insidious, and Craven vitalizes the nightmare sequences with assorted surrealist novelties.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    As the furiously passive-aggressive title character, Jonah Hill delivers a craftier comic performance than anything in his box-office hits (Superbad, Get Him to the Greek), but what really elevates the story above its shticky premise is the combined neuroses of all three characters.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Rivers comes across as a consummate professional but also a genuine person, ruthlessly honest about her life decisions and utterly devoid of self-pity.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Winter's Bone often seems to be unfolding in a world apart, with its own moral logic and codes of conduct. It might feel like prison if it weren't so obviously home.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The movie premiered in January at the Sundance Film Festival, too soon to include a tragic denouement: in April the U.S. command surrendered the Korangal Valley to the Taliban.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This engrossing documentary widens to consider the phenomenon of viral videos and the humiliation they can bring to their sometimes unsuspecting victims.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The movie takes as its mantra and organizing principle President Kennedy's observation, during his 1961 speech to the United Nations, that "every man, woman, and child lives under a nuclear sword of Damocles, hanging by the slenderest of threads, capable of being cut at any moment by accident, or miscalculation, or by madness."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This second feature doesn't resonate with nearly as much power, but its suspenseful story of two generations of career criminals in the city's northerly Charlestown neighborhood has a similarly haunting quality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The maternal triangle is pretty well handled too, giving a good sense of where Lennon came by all that exuberance and melancholy.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    "American Casino" and Michael Moore's "Capitalism: A Love Story" offered more striking images of the human wreckage, but Ferguson is more successful at nailing the perpetrators in New York and their gullible accomplices in Washington.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Doug Liman's Fair Game is a model exercise in dramatizing recent political scandal, and easily the best fact-based Hollywood political thriller since "All the President's Men."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The characters are so vivid that the suspense never lags. Crowe is best in buttoned-down roles like this one, and he holds the husband's fear and resolve in balance.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This haunting drama by Claire Denis burns with a mute fear and rage at the ongoing atrocities in central Africa.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Screenwriter Mark Bomback doesn't do much with the backstory scenes linking Pine and Washington to their worried families, but the main story is gripping, flawlessly paced, and nicely grounded in operational detail.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    This remake by Joel and Ethan Coen is being positioned as a truer True Grit, and though they take their own liberties with the plot and tone, they preserve Portis's impeccably authentic dialogue, which does more to conjure up the Arkansas of the 1870s than any period trappings.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    John Cameron Mitchell directed, making an impressive detour in style and subject matter after his flamboyant "Shortbus" (2006) and "Hedwig and the Angry Inch" (2001).
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    Though Casino Jack never lets its protagonist off the hook for his misdeeds, it does underline the hypocrisy of those politicians who were content to take his money but then ran for cover in February 2004 when the Washington Post began to expose his fleecing of six different Indian tribes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The performances are so gripping that the movie works despite its diagrammatic structure, which focuses on ironic rhymes between past and present and leaves out the entirety of the couple's marriage.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    The dialogue is multilingual but largely incidental to the action; the physical comedy is gracefully rendered and often magical.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    A brief but piercing cameo by Imelda Staunton (Vera Drake), as a desolate old woman who fiercely rejects professional counseling for depression, drives home Leigh's greatest insight, that true happiness is not found but realized.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 J.R. Jones
    No simple tabloid recap. Gibney applies himself to two mysteries, neither of which he unravels but both of which make for gripping cinema.