For 816 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Justin Chang's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Foxcatcher
Lowest review score: 0 Some Kind Of Beautiful
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 88 out of 816
816 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    This hyperactive toon extravaganza has color, flair and energy to burn. But it’s the sort of relentless juggling act that finally proves more exhausting than exhilarating.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    Observing the situation at an icy remove, Beyond the Hills never builds the palpable menace and pressure-cooker anxiety of "4 Months," and its dramatic progression feels obvious, even predictable, by comparison.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    True torture-porn aficionados will be disappointed, as editor Tariq Anwar cuts away right before blade meets flesh -- a move that feels a tad, well, gutless under the circumstances. But elsewhere, "Citizen" proves startlingly graphic, even by R-rated standards.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    Krampus isn’t especially scary, but it generates goodwill nonetheless for treating its home-invasion-for-the-holidays setup with an appreciably straight face.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    A middling third-wheel comedy elevated a couple of notches by the ineffably weird charms of Owen Wilson.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    Lemmons advances this story with straight-faced conviction, orchestrating narrative and spectacle with a grandiosity that proves easier to admire from a distance than it is to engage with onscreen.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    Though the plot here may be a confusing, multi-threaded mess (which may in fact be the script’s truest homage to Chandler), it’s occasionally offset by the exuberance with which Black blends splatter and slapstick, and the leeway he grants his two very game leads.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    Lee’s movie at once examines and embodies the complicated riddle of cultural identity: Beneath its boozy antics and largely predictable narrative developments, it offers warmly perceptive insights into how difficult it can be for so many first- and second-generation Asian immigrants to define themselves.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    As the hours roll slowly past, it’s hard not to feel that this epic achievement in monotonous misery might have retained its impact at a fraction of the length, and that even our grimmest truth-tellers might well find themselves capable of saying more with less.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    Much as he did with Ruth Rendell's "Live Flesh," Almodovar has taken an ice-cold psychological thriller, penned by a novelist of far less humanistic temperament, and performed some stylistic surgery of his own, adding broad comic relief, overripe melodrama, outrageous asides and zesty girl-power uplift.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    Surfing the crowd in Altman-lite style, pic skims the surface entertainingly but goes limp in its stabs at seriousness, especially in the final scenes, which all but drown in emotional confrontations and hasty happy endings.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    Though its absurdist inventions occasionally border on twee, this affectionate slow-blooming romance mines an understated vein of comic melancholy that the actors' wistful performances perfectly capture.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    Waist Deep packs considerable energy and style into its tale of an ex-con forced back into a life of crime to rescue his kidnapped son. Yet the kinetic direction and occasional sly humor can't disguise the tale's banal brutality or pump much excitement into its routinized pileup of shoot-outs and car chases.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Justin Chang
    An uneven but enjoyable trio of films that take affectionate (and sometimes literal) aim at the Japanese capital.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    The real battle in Roman Polanski's brisk, fitfully amusing adaptation of Yasmina Reza's popular play is a more formal clash between stage minimalism and screen naturalism, as this acid-drenched four-hander never shakes off a mannered, hermetic feel that consistently betrays its theatrical origins.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    By manipulating their story to advance the cynical notion that you really can't trust anyone, the filmmakers inadvertently beg the question why their own motives should be so above suspicion.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    An audacious premise gets dangerously unstable execution in Four Lions, a ballsy but wobbly high-concept farce that sends up the bumbling schemes of a Blighty-based jihadist cell.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    A self-serious eco-thriller assembled with a competent but heavy hand, A Dark Truth decries corporate corruption and Third World oppression in an all-too-obvious manner.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    A fabulously designed underground metropolis proves more involving than the teenagers running through its streets in City of Ember, a good-looking but no more than serviceable adaptation of Jeanne Duprau's 2003 novel.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    Overblown saga of shape-shifting demons, butt-kicking clerics and the perils of interspecies romance occasionally dazzles but finally frazzles with its relentless visual assault, embedding Jet Li and his capable castmates in one screensaver-ready fantasy backdrop after another.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    This intermittently effective thriller serves as a rickety vehicle for its two perfectly cast leads, working better as a slow-thawing two-hander than as a chilly ghost story.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    Made with obvious passion and drive, but also a nagging predilection for Holocaust-drama cliches.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    Unsubtle, uneven and undeniably effective, this take-no-prisoners cancer weepie poses a fascinating moral quandary.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    The undeniable intensity of Gyllenhaal’s bulked-up, Method-mumbling performance may leave you feeling more pummeled than convinced in this heavy-handed tale of redemption, in which director Antoine Fuqua once more demonstrates his fascination with codes of masculine aggression, extreme violence and not much else.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    Celeste & Jesse Forever earns points for bucking formula, but its fusion of snark and sincerity has a calculated slickness that rings increasingly hollow.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    Joffe's first feature never shakes off the feel of a telepic with above-average production values, and its unsteady lead performances and often garish stylistic touches make a muddle of the source material's psychological acuity.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    Joy
    Despite another solid performance from Jennifer Lawrence, anchoring Russell’s sincerely felt tribute to the power of a woman’s resolve in a man’s world, it’s hard not to wish Joy were better — that its various winsome parts added up to more than a flyweight product that still feels stuck in the development stage.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    This handsomely mounted picture is, at nearly 2 1/2 hours, far too long and indigestible for a film whose protagonist spends most of her screen time under house arrest.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    A mix of found-footage thriller, mock-doc realism and public service announcement that rings true almost as often as it rings false.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Justin Chang
    By the end, Ross’ initially disarming fusion of cleverness and whimsy has curdled into a dispiritingly familiar mix of sentimentality and self-satisfaction.

Top Trailers