For 1,083 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Phipps' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Neil Young: Heart of Gold
Lowest review score: 0 Kung Pow: Enter the Fist
Score distribution:
1083 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    When it does work, it's very funny, and worth a look both as an example of Allen's still-developing talent and—thanks to The Lovin' Spoonful—as the source of one of the greatest rock 'n' roll title songs ever to come out of a decade filled with excellent rock 'n' roll title songs.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Mackenzie's film could almost use one or two lurid touches in place of its stately distance. Then again, a more stylized approach might have allowed less room for Richardson, whose unsparing performance makes other elements almost irrelevant.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Roberts' script and direction show sparks of wit, but the plot comes lifted from countless heist films.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    The lovable characters remain, but they never do much of interest in a sequel that's safely above average but superfluous.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    As an action movie, Red Dawn is a repetitive headache, and anyone with Blue State sympathies will be appalled at its manipulations and exaggerations. But there's smart subtext beneath the big dumb explosions.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Machine makes its look-to-the-future-not-the-past message as clear as a Grammy acceptance speech, but as an exploration of regret and the elusive quality of time, it falls well short of "Memento," another film starring a sad-eyed Pearce.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Though it’s still a disappointment in relation to its two predecessors, it has much to recommend it. It begins and ends brilliantly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Though he never quite rescues the film, Bardem continually suggests the tensions bubbling under the surface that Dancer itself never penetrates.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Brett Ratner remains a director of no great distinction, but here, he proves himself an adept orchestrator of battle scenes, clearly presenting the forces on both sides, and using clear, coherent editing and dynamic compositions.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    A slow, meditative movie-an appropriate choice given the subject matter-that ultimately fails, in spite of clearly heartfelt good intentions, because of its almost inhuman detachment.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Love Liza needs more than mood on its side. A moment of recognizable human behavior would have been a fine place to start.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Though it's tough to find much fault with a film so sweet, Piglet's Big Movie never lives up to its title.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    The film refreshingly portrays its kids as part of a diverse group trying to succeed in a country in which they can never find secure footing. That’s the big-picture story here, and one even the occasional underdog cliché can’t obscure.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Like its immediate predecessor, Muppets Most Wanted has one tremendous advantage, even when it missteps: Muppets.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    By the film's halfway point, the subplots have all started to head in the most obvious directions imaginable, which is too bad, since they all have real potential. Ferrera's story of spending the summer as an out-of-place ethnic element in the milk-white suburbs stays interesting the longest, in large part thanks to her performance.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    For much of The Patience Stone, Farahani is the movie, and as she shifts from fear to despair to anger to emotions she’d never previously considered, her magnetic presence goes a long way toward putting a human face on the film, more successfully than the material around her.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Panayotopoulou's background in photography shows in the way she lets her chiaroscuro lighting mirror her characters' emotions. It also shows in the still-life quality that Hard Goodbyes never quite gets beyond.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    It’s fun, but it’s ultimately more of the same in brand-new packaging.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    For those who like Carrey and are waiting for a film they can honestly say they enjoyed through and through, this ain't it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Tying The Knot's central point remains insistently stated. It would be hard for anyone to watch it and still think of the demand for same-sex marriage as a mere passing fancy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    It's a stylish, cleverly plotted, perpetually unpredictable film with another electric (albeit brief) performance from Penn. So why is it so unaffecting?
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Wong’s usual concerns overwhelm the film, and though his pairing of fisticuffs and longing is sometimes awkward, he surrounds the awkwardness with some of the most beautiful images in his career. In Wong’s world, beauty goes a long way.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    When the suspense setpieces do come, many of them are staged with considerably less imagination—with cheap jolts underscored by an intrusive score—than would be expected from director Wes Craven.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Occasionally, the film invites a more dynamic touch than the careful slowness Cholodenko carries over from "High Art." But that same care gives the movie a seductive quality that would have been lost in a more hurried approach.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    It's passably gripping and occasionally lively.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    In the end, Chaos is as compelling as it is confounding, and it's compelling in large part because of the confusion it stirs.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    It's clumsy, but also strangely refreshing. To children raised on "Spy Kids" and "SpongeBob SquarePants," it may look as primitive as a daguerreotype, but never underestimate the persuasive powers of a cute animal.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    As Ouimet, the always-terrific Shia LeBeouf is an oasis of depth in a film that otherwise can't pass up a sports-film cliché.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Only a truly great director can make a film of high artistic merit, filled with personality and memorable scenes, that's still a borderline disaster. (Think One From The Heart or 1941.) So the heartfelt and woefully miscalculated Elizabethtown may be the film that marks Cameron Crowe's arrival as a truly great director.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Phipps
    Unfortunately, Russell paces the film as if trying to demonstrate what eternity feels like. When the plot begs to move forward, the film keeps lingering over friendly fawns and long walks through the forest.

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