For 619 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Fifi Howls from Happiness
Lowest review score: 20 Pain & Gain
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 619
619 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    No simplistic status parable. It’s more a psychological snapshot of a person forever doomed to remain a voyeur to her own life
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Filmmakers from Jacques Rivette to Hou Hsiao-hsien have treated the City of Light like Alice’s rabbit hole; writer-director Hong Sang-soo similarly embraces the fantasy, but goes one step further in this extraordinary character study by fully erasing the line that separates the actual from the fictional.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Sokurov, who also acted as director of photography, films the character and his surroundings with the eye of a newly arrived visitor to another world.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It’s likely that only Herzog would dare to, and succeed at, resolving this singular cinematic object by contemplating the fate of an abandoned basketball.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Strangely enough, our knowledge of what’s to come makes Word Is Out that much more affecting, because it shows that there were—and are—pockets of peace amid the brutality of an ongoing civil-rights struggle.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    This is Young in his playroom, grabbing his toys at random while indulging his every antimelodic whim, and Demme’s off-the-cuff approach makes for the perfect aesthetic complement.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The most impressive aspect of Breillat’s feature is that it agitates like the best fairy tales, seducing us with otherworldliness before sticking the knife in and permanently inscribing the moral.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The meanings of Close-Up shift, subtly and profoundly, with every viewing; the only certainty is that its rewards are boundless.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Alain Resnais's mind-bending new feature.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Indeed, you leave the film feeling like Wiseman has given you a glimpse of one of those ephemeral ports in a storm to which all of us retreat at times.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    These characters are more than what we see on the surface, and it's thanks to Leigh's rigorous yet generous eye that we never just gawk at the drama.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Its stunningly composed images showing how Isaac is himself something of a ghost-given to staring off into the distance, being condescended to by those around him, a man perpetually outside the times. What he needs is to take that one extra step toward his spectral siren; the scene in which he does so might be one of the most exhilarating visions of death's sweet embrace ever filmed.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    What you see and hear always seems perfectly natural, even if you can't exactly say why. Who needs words when you have cinema?
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The Tree of Life enthralls right from the start.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    And though not all of Lonergan's conceits work on a scene-by-scene basis (an upper-crust womanizer played by Jean Reno skews a bit too close to caricature), the film has a cumulative power-solidified by a devastating opera-house finale-that's staggering. This is frayed-edges filmmaking at its finest.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Nichols has said that the idea for the film emerged from a free-floating anxiety that he sensed in the world at large, the feeling that everything we treasure in life could be lost in an instant. That sensation permeates this strikingly original movie - especially its enigmatic mind-fuck of a finale, which will haunt you for several lifetimes.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The Cold War is over, but director Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In) and his collaborators have brought those suspicion-fueled days to vivid life in this masterful adaptation of John le Carré's beloved 1974 spy novel.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Sure it is - and a great one at that.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    A dream, indeed. Sure to delight foodies and cinephiles alike.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Those Dardenne brothers…still making great movies with second-nature ease.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Brava, Mia! The exceedingly talented Ms. Hansen-Løve (the writer-director of Father of My Children) is sure to win many more fans with her latest feature, an incisive, exhilaratingly frank examination of l'amour lost.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    This time around, the director documents a 2011 Young solo show in Toronto (the musician's birthplace), but in an intentionally fractured way.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It's McConaughey who is the real revelation: All Grim Reaper strut and cutthroat stare, he savors each of Letts's vividly ghoulish lines.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It is the richly evocative performances of Marion (aggressive yet enticing) and Merhar (wearing world-weariness like an aged suit) that cut deepest.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Wang has made a confidently intimate movie that is devastatingly larger-than-life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It isn't until the story reaches its fancifully abstract final passages, where cinema displaces music as Douglas's weapon of choice, that Chase's reverie reveals itself as a particularly exceptional exploration of how art ceases being an idle hobby and becomes an obsessive vocation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Moreover, the story doesn’t climax in all’s-well-that-ends-well matrimony, instead building to a beautifully bittersweet moment of self-realization, one with a light-touch profundity that would make the Bard proud.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Gallo and Dalle are sublimely tragic figures; the scene in which Shane stalks around Notre Dame like Frankenstein unleashed is a pitch-perfect encapsulation of the way the film plays with and deepens movie-monster archetypes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    If Jim Jarmusch’s languorous, laconic style isn’t your bag, his stone-faced vampire comedy won’t make you a believer. Those who’ve already been bitten, however, will swoon like the film’s toothy leads whenever their lips touch neck juice.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    You could hardly ask for a more beautiful vision of souls in transit.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    You may often find yourself second-guessing the film, questioning how—and if—it will all come together. But by the time of the intense and impassioned climax, a storm of emotion is ensured: a great movie rising before you like a delusion, like a dream.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Rohmer has a genius for taking a seemingly mundane situation and slowly tightening the screws.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The journey is often challenging, but the rewards—heady, emotional, provocative and invigorating—are endless.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    You might actually say the documentary itself is Mohassess’s final canvas, so infused it becomes with his alternately infuriating and infectious personality.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    By using Laura as an avatar, Marker actually helps us see the visuals and their knotty meanings much more clearly. The more we watch, the more Laura softens, until — in a mind-bending conceit — her very status as a fictional creation is called into question. The effect is ecstatic.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The popular view of art is that it belongs to the masses. Wiseman casts a more skeptical eye, questioning such egalitarianism with cold, hard historical context. Yet he simultaneously acknowledges that these works live on far beyond their original purpose, even if, as the film’s bold, brilliant climax suggests, they may eventually play to an audience of none.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Spelling may not be Quentin Tarantino’s forte, but his grasp of language (both verbal and visual) is peerless.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What follows is pulp made near-profound through director Jonathan Mostow’s sure-handed guidance.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Ferrara’s unconventional methods only manage to serve Chelsea on the Rocks, his loving portrait of Manhattan’s boho landmark, the Chelsea Hotel.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    West is far more adept at and interested in sustaining an unrelentingly ominous mood than in executing the genre-required spook shocks.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The unspoken theme underlying Dickens’s prose--that the money-grubbing Ebenezer is conversing with semblances of his own self--finds near-perfect cinematic expression through Carrey’s efforts.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The real drama in Parnassus comes from the troupe of sideshow performers, led by a terrifically morbid Christopher Plummer.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It would be risible if Ozon’s hand didn’t remain so steady and confident throughout, all the way up to a complicatedly upbeat conclusion that recreates the Christian Annunciation with the straightest of faces.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Polanski has made a genre piece with a verve and vitality that’s in sadly short supply.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The running time may make you blanch, but Connie Field’s seven-part documentary about the history and eventual dissolution of South African apartheid is well worth the commitment.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What emerges is an illuminating, though terribly dismaying, portrait of the War on Terror’s lasting effects. Whether one retreats or steps out defiantly, there is no sanctuary.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The tone this time out is primarily comic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's easy to think of comics, especially time-tested ones like Rivers, as mechanical laugh-generators. Stern and Sundberg allow her to reveal the deep-rooted humanity of those ever-present quips, and the effect is humbling.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Director Christian Carion (Merry Christmas) establishes a low-key yet threatening atmosphere right from the start, and gets terrific performances from Kusturica and Canet.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's a contemporary movie musical that makes you feel genuinely sky-high.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Thompson's imagination-she's also the screenwriter-knows no bounds, and she does a brilliant job of connecting the fantastical elements to the sobering realities of life during wartime.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It will test your faith in humanity, but Hersonski's film is nonetheless a brilliant reminder of the importance of bearing witness.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Taken on its own fun-over-philosophy terms, this is an exercise in tone-shifting virtuosity.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It isn't the first time death has figured in an Allen movie, but the way he grapples with it here (leaving each character at a moment of irresolution comparable to staring down the man with the scythe) is much more potent and direct.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The first part of Deathly Hallows has plenty of invigorating imagery alongside the pro forma narrative elements.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    By the end, you feel curiously closer to the performer and her process without having any clue how you got there. It's exhilarating.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    You still leave hoping he ultimately found peace and enlightenment, two things he graciously gave to those of us who hung on his every word.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Chomet builds this beguiling symphony of sadness to a poignant finale that does ample justice to the many layers of Tati's tale, both in text and out.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Do you like movies about gladiators? Well, lend me your ears: The Eagle will more than gratify your sword-and-sandal cravings.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Yun is quite simply spectacular as a woman who holds steadfastly on to her dignity and empathy, even in the face of unspeakable tragedy.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Godly as the monks are, they are still human-which makes their ultimate sacrifice all the more devastating.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    New Yorkers and those who've been following the neighborhood's plight know exactly how this ends; at the very least, Paravel and Sniadecki have preserved the memory of what was. Sometimes, that's the most you can do.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film builds to a shattering climax that works precisely because all involved fully embrace the melodrama. Be sure to bring Kleenex.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A moving meditation on history, knowledge and mortality.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film suddenly gains in power, until it fulfills the promise of its title with hard-hitting compassion and a crystal-clear sense of grace.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film isn't blinded by Candy's beauty and celebrity; it digs critically, if still empathetically, beneath.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    As engrossing as it is maddening, Pierre Thoretton's documentary on the sale of Yves Saint Laurent's extensive art collection is perched somewhere between a sanded-edged official portrait and a keen examination of affluence run amok.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is prime Woody Allen - insightful, philosophical and very funny.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A movie with an unflinchingly tough heart.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This fascinatingly knotty movie never becomes a facile screed against the powers that be. Instead, it plays as a more relaxed and leisurely requiem for a slowly vanishing way of life, with sounds and images-a time-lapse contemplation of the cosmos is in the running for scene of the year-that are as mesmerizing as they are subtly pointed.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's an equally insightful and excruciating journey, with our quip-ready protagonist perpetually caught between two modes: eager-to-please caffeinated and near-breakdown frustrated.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It never feels as if we're watching a brand-name cash-grab, but instead as if we're participating in an endlessly imaginative afternoon of play.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Jendreyko elegantly sketches in the details of his subject's life and the historical events surrounding her coming-of-age-out of which emerges a fascinating subtext about the malleable powers of language.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmaking is patient and participatory, getting down in the dirt with the workers (in one case the lens is even soaked by a spray of sludge) and allowing several touchingly distinct personalities to emerge.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Toward the end of the film, a few hard-hitting cuts between young and old brings the title's meaning home: These children have an inescapable life of drudgery before them, and there's little likelihood it will change anytime soon.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Even at a mere 75 minutes, Silent Souls is thrillingly dense and allusive, and the elegiac finale maintains the overall air of mystery while beautifully bringing all the disparate threads together.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A lesser movie might hammer home the idea that the cult squashes Martha's sense of self. This distinctive and haunting effort implies something much scarier: that there is no self to start with.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is an exquisite portrait of a family navigating the wreckage imparted to them by one of their own.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It would be a Christmas miracle save for one lump of coal: an ear-shattering Justin Bieber song over the end credits. Gotta sell something to the kids at Yuletide.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Fassbender and his multifaceted allure helps counteract any thematic or conceptual shakiness, as was the case in McQueen's highly uneven debut, "Hunger." One thing's for sure: McQueen has found his De Niro, and he better keep him close.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Leigh does a stellar job of showing how these events seep into the unaware girl's everyday existence - almost all of the film's sequences are photographed in precisely composed, inherently surreal single shots.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This lifelong Tintin fan was more than pleased, even while having to acknowledge that the movie lacks the subtle state-of-the-world commentary that Hergé often smuggled into his creation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Despite his repentance, you sense that this lost soul will be confessing his sins for all eternity.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    When the action eventually switches to an Austrian rehab retreat, Dalle gets to make like the best of the Old Hollywood divas and waste away with devastating reserve - an icon quietly, crushingly crashing to earth.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The mostly dialogue-free middle section is a scare-film master class - and when a becalmed smile does finally cross his lips, it's in the most giddily mordant of circumstances. As Arthur embraces the darkness, so does the darkness embrace us.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    First-time director Josh Trank, working from a taut script by Max "Son of John" Landis, indulges in some wild, witty spectacle, but he's equally adept with the tale's grimmer elements, especially when the introverted Andrew unleashes his inner Magneto and uses the city of Seattle as his tear-it-apart emotional playground.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Watching the formerly spry Harris struggle to maintain a normal life (he's frequently glassy-eyed and jacked on painkillers) emphasizes the underappreciated sacrifices our men and women in uniform make in the name of vaguely defined ideals.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Losier has made a quietly revolutionary work that treats a pair of people on the fringes with the decency all humans deserve.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Too many movies come to us as preordained cult objects - this is the real deal.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A 25-words-or-less pitch for The Day He Arrives - shot in luminous black-and-white - might go something like: "Hong Sang-soo does Groundhog Day."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Though the film wraps up its spinning-plates narrative a little too neatly, this is still a Scandi-noir to die for.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Even the stoniest face will crack when Aladeen sums up our cultural moment in a rousing, uproarious climactic speech worthy of both Chaplin and Team America.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Anderson's romantic fantasia is after something much more complicated and profound-an ever-renewing balance between the hopes of youth and the disappointments of age.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The oft-hilarious push-and-pull between director and subject - Williams wryly notes that the film is turning into "the Steve and Paulie Show" - effectively hacks away at the celebrity-enthusiast divide. By the end of this perceptive dual portrait, both men are content to merely be human.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's in between the lines that this movingly perceptive film scores a TKO.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Puzzling and provocative, Alps has a lingering power and an effect that is thrillingly difficult to define.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What most distinguishes the redo is the often remarkable use of 3-D: Miike turns the format's inherent limitations, especially the tendency toward visual murkiness, to his advantage, fully immersing us in a world suffused with moral and ethical rot.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Sensitive parents shouldn't fret; this is the kind of grim fairy tale, equal parts midnight-movie macabre and family-round-the-hearth compassionate, that scars in all the right ways.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Coleman's life and work are treated as a continuum, which Clarke pulls from at will.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Imagine if Frederick Wiseman and David Lynch had a bastard child, and you'll get a sense of the movie's off-kilter aesthetic, a potent and pointed mix of firsthand observation and surreal flights of fancy.

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