For 599 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Not Fade Away
Lowest review score: 20 John Dies at the End
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 599
599 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's almost worth wading through the wearisome setup to get to the fun stuff. But there is a reason fast-forward buttons were invented.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The four leads more often than not transcend the material's calculated moroseness; Ivanir is especially good as a man whose perfectionist facade masks a soul in perpetual turmoil.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A study in simplicity, perhaps too much so. The writer-director is working in the same patiently observant vein as Argentine confederate Lisandro Alonso (Liverpool), especially in the intriguing early scenes, where the adults communicate mostly through furtive glances and expertly modulated body language.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The uniformly showy performances (Acting with a capital ‘A’) are what do in Prisoners more than anything.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Getting old's a bitch. But the long-in-the-tooth quintet (Chaplin, Fonda, Guy Bedos, Claude Rich and Pierre Richard) at the center of Stéphane Robelin's featherweight French comedy has it all figured out.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Tediousness sets in eventually; there's only so much zoological abyss-gazing one can do.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This aesthetically undistinguished yet still engrossing documentary follows the emotionally charged lead-up to the vote on Question One, a 2009 Maine referendum that put the marriage rights of gay and lesbian couples on the state ballot.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, there are a good number of Yen-choreographed action scenes to break up the monotony.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The more that fright-flick conventions take over, the more the movie's recognizable and resonant human fears are dulled.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The movie feels like too much of a lark. To paraphrase the play’s voice of reason, Friar Francis, it would be better if Whedon paused awhile and let his counsel sway us more.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Clooney occasionally shows a surer hand: He gets great work from Downton Abbey’s Bonneville — notably in an emotionally charged scene revolving around Michelangelo’s Madonna of Bruges — and has a fine monologue himself, in which Stokes dresses down a high-ranking German commander (a moving encapsulation of the American spirit at its best).
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though its insights are slight-the movie feels as delicate and ephemeral as its sleepy winter surroundings - you can't help but admire the overall generousness O'Brien shows to his characters and performers.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Mud
    Despite the best efforts of a cast that mixes unstudied newbies such as The Tree of Life’s Sheridan with Hollywood prima donnas like Reese Witherspoon (a starlet-slumming-it distraction as Mud's dim-bulb inamorata), there’s an overall clunkiness that Nichols is unable to overcome.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's enough filmmaking talent evident throughout that you wish the journey were more satisfying overall.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The perfectly sculpted, entirely sure-of-himself Tom ultimately seems more of a construct than a character, his carefree nature shaped almost entirely by the very wish-fulfillment clichés that the movie otherwise sidesteps.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Viewers familiar with Daniels’s idiosyncratically vulgar work might be disappointed that there’s little here that compares to Nicole Kidman loosing a yellow stream on Zac Efron’s jellyfish stings in "The Paperboy" (2012).
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As subcultural anthropology, it’s unassailable. Yet the often ugly-looking DV aesthetic dilutes the cumulative effect.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Imagine "His Girl Friday" crossed with "Armageddon" and you’ll get a sense of the unfortunate disconnect that prevents an enjoyable light entertainment from achieving rom-com nirvana.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A too-pat ending also spoils Rubberneck (shorter: Mommy made me do it!), though it doesn’t ruin the steely pleasures of the filmmaking.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though often funny, there’s a reverse narcissism in the way Karpovsky wallows in his “character’s” off-putting flaws.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Ticking-time-bomb suspense is not Nair’s forte, so she relies on Michael Andrews’s Middle East–inflected score to do most of the heavy lifting in the present-day scenes, which feel shapeless and perfunctory.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    What ran more than three hours onstage now barely cracks two, and the cutting can be felt in the way the often gut-busting bad behavior is privileged over psychological credibility.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    If anything distinguishes director Régis Roinsard’s take on well-trod material, it’s his Technicolor-bright widescreen palette (recalling many a late-’50s pillow-talk romance without a hint of snooty irony) and energetically game cast.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though Lemmons’s parable-like intentions are clear, almost every beat of Langston’s tale, with its absent father figures and heated gun-pointing melodrama, rings false — hardly a fitting contemporary complement to the Greatest Story Ever Told.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, Roth himself proves to be a fascinating presence — soft-spoken, sharp and bearing a vague air of melancholy that offsets the surrounding adulation.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Watching this see-in-the-dark muscleman brooding against gorgeous otherworldly vistas, all while crafting pointy homemade weapons and befriending a scene-stealing CGI canine (no joke), is a sci-fi aficionado's delight.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Stick with the film, though, and you might find yourself strangely moved by its oddball mix of ripe melodrama, overwrought violence and regional verisimilitude.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    They have little feel for the technical side of filmmaking; the imagery is flat and the editing amateurish. Most shots seem held for a beat too long or too short, wreaking havoc with the comic rhythm. Nonetheless, McCarthy and Falcone’s attempts to make Tammy more flesh-and-blood than a figure of fun are often poignant.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Loznitsa would have done better to embrace the story’s enigmas as opposed to explicate them.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Would that the climax lived up to the tension-filled first two thirds. Let’s just say that Non-Stop reaches for some pointed post-9/11 political commentary that almost entirely exceeds its grasp. Total brainlessness, in this case, would have been a virtue.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You still leave impressed at the way Stanton fiercely protects the aura of mystery that makes him such an indelible onscreen presence.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You can barely stifle a laugh, and the way Wright and Watts deliver rote, morally searching dialogue with deer-in-the-headlights stoicism (“We’ve crossed a line,” Lil blankly notes) doesn’t help matters.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Still, if any modern strip is worthy of an extended, Hobbes-style tongue bath, it’s this one.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is not a choice made lightly by anyone involved, but the admirable, multilayered toughness of these sequences is unfortunately weakened by the filmmakers’ saccharine touch whenever they explore the doctors’ personal lives.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Smash & Grab aims to replicate the mesmeric tension of a Michael Mann thriller (the crime-cinema impresario is even explicitly referenced by one of the cops assigned to hunt down the group), though the film is so all over the place stylistically that it often seems like several different movies cut together.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    What keeps you watching is the charisma of the performers: Hamm does an amiable riff on his Don Draper persona (he’s cynical before the big melt), Lake Bell is a delight as his tart-tongued love interest, and Sharma and Mittal are all charm as the cultures-uniting underdogs.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Photographed with an alluring sheen that complements the coldly commercial wheelings and dealings of its subjects, Red Obsession fascinatingly reveals how Old World vintner artistry is being shaken up by New World supply and demand.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Joe
    Yet Green, as is his wont, too often strains for poetic effect through flowery voiceover and tone-deaf interactions — like those between Joe and his latest short-term girlfriend — that undercut the genuineness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately Coppola’s sensitivity is always evident, especially in the open-hearted performances she gets from Roberts and Kilmer (whose father, Val, has a funny, pot-addled cameo).
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Once the undead start walking, however, the film loses some of its footing: Most of the bloodletting is staged with quick-cut inelegance better suited to the hack horror production of your choosing, though there’s still a potent air of hopelessness that lingers as the cast is winnowed away "Ten Little Indians"–style.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Once Pip reaches the big city, Newell starts losing the dramatic focus, piling on incidents and revelations with a bombastic force that makes it seem as if we’re watching a cheap 19th-century telenovela.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s still enough of merit here (particularly a movingly low-key finale that strikes just the right note of reconciliation and regret) to suggest that Porterfield has the chops to eventually hone his talents to a fine point.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The overall effect is not unlike watching a chef de cuisine experimenting in his off-hours; not everything takes, but you still come away with a pleasingly stimulated palate.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The scenes of the film’s exuberant, frizzy-haired protagonist wandering Naples and revisiting old haunts, however, seem much more unfocused—a ramshackle search for insights into the man’s art and life that rarely come. The instruments are in tune, but the rhythm is off.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There are a few too many twists on this highway.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Imagine "Goodfellas" without much in the way of stakes, and you’ll get Clint Eastwood’s pleasingly square and forgettable adaptation of the Tony-feted 2006 jukebox musical.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You’re thankful when Ayer stops trying to artistically tart up this Peckinpah-lite tale of vengeance and just lets his leading man do what he does best: blow the bad guys away.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Anyone who has ever loved a television show can see that Thomas and his crew are working overtime to give VM aficionados everything they want.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The movie is never less than involving, but rarely amounts to more than a third-generation grindhouse knockoff.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is hardly a symphony of terror, but it’s still a solidly composed exercise in suspense.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Quentin Tarantino showcased her bubbly personality (and ass-kicking dexterity) in 2007’s terrific gearhead horror movie, "Death Proof." Now, seasoned stuntwoman Zoë Bell gets a vehicle all her own—a disposable battle royal no-budgeter that’s immensely elevated by her presence.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The story beats are as familiar as they come, and there are a few halfhearted stabs at redeeming Roberts’s clueless character when it would have been better to push her feeble-mindedness to Anna Faris–esque extremes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Here, though, everyone involved seems above the rom-com conventions they’re satirizing, so anxious to get to each punch line that they let the connective tissue languish. You howl often but quickly forget why.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is a movie that preaches to its rafters-raising choir.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    These scenes make you wish the rest of the movie had similar bite, but Gibney tends toward that dutiful doc style that mixes talking heads and archival clips into a flavorless stew—a bland complement to Fela’s zesty on- and offstage presence.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s a fine line between modesty and inconsequence, and this low-key, primarily improvised feature from mumblecore staple Joe Swanberg mostly blurs the divide.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Hellion aims to cut deep, striking a tone that melds the hysterical moralism of Larry Clark’s Kids (1995) with the coming-of-age melancholy of Mud’s Jeff Nichols (also this film’s executive producer).
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    May’s biggest get, however, is Ciavarella himself—a man forever rationalizing his shady actions, who emerges as a more complexly tragic figure than you’d think possible.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Family members fight and reconcile over delicious-looking regional cuisine, new romantic possibilities present themselves, and Deneuve swans through all the heartstring-plucking silliness like the ethereal superstar she is. There are worse things in life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Maier’s images are truly stunning—vivid documents of the working class that are off-the-cuff yet rigorously composed, always capturing that enigmatic bit of her subject’s soul that leaves you in spine-tingled awe.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Aatsinki siblings never rise past a kind of rotely anonymous masculinity, and overall the film tends to lull rather than engage the senses.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s bleakness in the beauty: What begins as a personal coming-of-age story ends as a tragic tale of a community’s stunted adolescence.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The brotherly-love epiphany to which the film builds does effectively pluck the heartstrings, but there’s a lingering sense that we’re being had.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    All of this is fascinating in the moment, yet the doc never yokes all these threads into anything particularly deep or illuminating. The Galapagos Affair is less social commentary, more gossip.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Marvin Kren’s enjoyable if ephemeral horror movie gets by for a while on its dopey premise.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It’s unfortunate that Stelling and his cast aren’t able to lift the story much above mawkishness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Nicholas Wrathall’s documentary—rough-edged in style, yet anchored by pointed and poignant interviews with the man himself — is mostly for those already fascinated by Vidal’s colorful life.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film adheres closely to a well-reviewed theater production cocreated by and starring Andre Gregory and Wallace Shawn, both of whom get to riff on their prickly "My Dinner with Andre" rapport.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    For a few brief moments, the film becomes something close to Greek mythology, as opposed to graphic-novel imitator. What a feeling!
    • 83 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Reitman, who also cowrote the screenplay, feels the constant need to "deepen" his characters, granting them wants and motivations--especially during the moralistic third act--that are totally alien to how they're initially portrayed.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lone Scherfig directs it all as if it were a breezy lark, so a third-act tonal shift makes for an incongruous, excessively moralistic fit with everything that’s preceded. Most insulting, though, is the way in which the climactic passages miraculously tidy up every frayed edge of Jenny’s life.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Sadly, “Get out of my lab!” is not the new “Get off my plane!”
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A grimy kitchen-sink melodrama with an Ajax cleanser script: The muck is all surface, the turmoil cleanly shallow and contrived, though never less than gripping.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Given the months-long hype, what’s most bewildering about Sundance sensation Precious is its overall shrug-worthiness.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Let’s not dance around it: Nine--is a dud.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The true soulfulness of Sendak’s parable never emerges.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The cast to die for is almost entirely wasted in this machismo-marinated slab of Brit-crime nastiness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Director-cinematographer Steven Soderbergh’s indifference to the material is palpable and of a piece with his deathly dull output of late.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Writer-director Jane Campion approaches the tale with an artiste’s respectful solemnity, but it too often comes off like "Twilight" transplanted across oceans and centuries.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There’s nothing more boring than a life embalmed with halfhearted Hollywood bombast, which only makes the film’s fleeting pleasures stand out all the more.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There’s little that can be done with material wrung of its complications to accommodate an ultimately life-affirming, it-all-works-out agenda.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Props should be given to Rodriguez’s breathless “let’s put on a show” inventiveness. Plus, Macy and the booger--kick ass!
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lee and Schamus make history blandly palatable; in the process, they rob the times and the people they’re portraying of their complications.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There’s a marked sense of retreat in this tale that’s never explored--everyone goes out of the way to remember the past through rose-colored specs.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A slipshod documentary about a fascinating subject: the loaded history and current complications of African-American hairstyling.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The film slowly loses the sobering toughness of its initial inquiry, and finally comes off as bloodline-biased hagiography.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Credit Broderick and the cast for putting across the fey Indiewood bullcrap with committed, nearly convincing effort.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Unlike Carroll’s perversely idealized protagonist, Burton’s Alice is just another anachronistic feminist tearing down Victorian patriarchal norms. Even her—[shudder]—Avril Lavigne–blared theme song is a skin-deep grrrl-power accessory.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Bong is so concerned with whodunit that his creaky genre mechanics diminish Kim's determined performance.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A tedious example of speculative fiction.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    One wrongheaded jaw-dropper follows another.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Jolie must eventually become a comic-book supergirl impervious to explosions and bullets, all the better to set up a "Bourne"-like franchise by the final fade-out.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Winterbottom’s inability to bring off this lurid stew of sex and violence is one problem; his (mis)direction of Affleck is another.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A Jerry Bruckheimer–produced video-game adaptation--it has to be good, doesn’t it? (Ya, sarcasm.)
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Sontag’s true talent was for the printed word; behind the camera, her limitations come more harshly to light. Upon Promised Land’s release, she recounted her experiences in Vogue--an all-too-appropriate forum since her film is mostly chic posturing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It’s a shame that Toe to Toe adheres so stridently to Indiewood clichés.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Maybe Douglas Sirk could have made something profound out of the pseudo-ennobling horsepucky. As is, The Last Song is what the crinkle-nosed Southern belle in all of us would resoundingly deem “Trash! Trash! Trash!”
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A dumb comedy out to prove its genre-defying smarts--the title is both an onscreen-supported reference to Walt Whitman and a wacky-tobaccy allusion--Leaves of Grass is a mostly mirthless affair; not even the sight of Edward Norton portraying twins tickles as it should.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This is like a subpar "Naked Gun" feature cooked up by Eisenstein and Godard during a drug-addled lost weekend. Where's Leslie Nielsen when you need him?
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The thought behind this body-splattering nostalgia trip is unformed and stagnant.