For 621 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Goodbye First Love
Lowest review score: 20 Couples Retreat
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 621
621 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    What ran more than three hours onstage now barely cracks two, and the cutting can be felt in the way the often gut-busting bad behavior is privileged over psychological credibility.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The jittery aesthetic is a bit grating - there's a three-cut minimum per roundhouse kick - but the spectacularly named Olivier Megaton (Transporter 3) still manages to deliver the action-film goods.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film lurches through narrative incidents: Battle scenes, political intrigue and a ticking-time-bomb love triangle are all pitched at the level of mundane competence and rarely get the blood racing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Family members fight and reconcile over delicious-looking regional cuisine, new romantic possibilities present themselves, and Deneuve swans through all the heartstring-plucking silliness like the ethereal superstar she is. There are worse things in life.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Getting old's a bitch. But the long-in-the-tooth quintet (Chaplin, Fonda, Guy Bedos, Claude Rich and Pierre Richard) at the center of Stéphane Robelin's featherweight French comedy has it all figured out.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Terrific performances and superb cinematography (by Claire Denis’s right hand, Agnès Godard) lift cowriter-director Ursula Meier’s feature debut above its thuddingly metaphorical premise.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    After the story takes a cloyingly sentimental turn, this lean-and-mean thriller becomes bathetically bloated. Just a few spokes short of a wheel, guys.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You can barely stifle a laugh, and the way Wright and Watts deliver rote, morally searching dialogue with deer-in-the-headlights stoicism (“We’ve crossed a line,” Lil blankly notes) doesn’t help matters.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It’s a reasonably diverting piece of work, falling somewhere between the high of "Magic Mike" (2012) and the low of "Haywire" (2011), among his recent efforts.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Hellion aims to cut deep, striking a tone that melds the hysterical moralism of Larry Clark’s Kids (1995) with the coming-of-age melancholy of Mud’s Jeff Nichols (also this film’s executive producer).
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    If anything distinguishes director Régis Roinsard’s take on well-trod material, it’s his Technicolor-bright widescreen palette (recalling many a late-’50s pillow-talk romance without a hint of snooty irony) and energetically game cast.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The perfectly sculpted, entirely sure-of-himself Tom ultimately seems more of a construct than a character, his carefree nature shaped almost entirely by the very wish-fulfillment clichés that the movie otherwise sidesteps.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The aural and visual overload that marks most of the director's work is here in spades--few documentaries look and sound so distinctive.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Photographed with an alluring sheen that complements the coldly commercial wheelings and dealings of its subjects, Red Obsession fascinatingly reveals how Old World vintner artistry is being shaken up by New World supply and demand.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Walken is particularly alive in a way he's rarely been since "Catch Me if You Can," adding untold shades to Hans's mystery-shrouded past - wait until you see what's under his cravat - while still giving his singularly eccentric line readings.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Filho so completely calculates his causes and effects, even going so far as to have the villain of the piece literally swimming with sharks, that you never fully feel the senses-altering charge of a truly impassioned polemic.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    When the monsters finally show themselves, this potent theme is lost amid a lot of proficiently staged but insubstantial scare scenes - heavy on musical stingers and weightless CGI.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Tediousness sets in eventually; there's only so much zoological abyss-gazing one can do.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This handsomely made spook story (love those echo-prone hallways!) becomes less involving the more the narrative's mysteries are solved. By the time all the tarot cards are on the table, it's likely that you too will feel conned.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Yet it's impossible to shake the sense that what felt thrillingly, cohesively alive in the director's earlier movies plays here with more laurel-resting creakiness than go-for-broke verve. Russell's once-mercurial assets have become a formula.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This aesthetically undistinguished yet still engrossing documentary follows the emotionally charged lead-up to the vote on Question One, a 2009 Maine referendum that put the marriage rights of gay and lesbian couples on the state ballot.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Shots of the kids and their friends running around unfamiliar environments have the fantastical qualities of Spike Jonze's "Where the Wild Things Are," minus the forced whimsy.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It’s an earnest hope, to be sure, and the greatest strength of Sam Raimi’s imaginative, if highly uneven, take on L. Frank Baum’s series of children’s stories about that magical land over the rainbow is its unabashed sincerity.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Hyde Park could have been fawningly ponderous; that it's merely an airy trifle puts it a cut above the usual Oscar bait.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fincher's film tips much more in the indulging direction of crowd Comic-Con - delighting the franchise junkie above all other considerations.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The movie is never less than involving, but rarely amounts to more than a third-generation grindhouse knockoff.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    If you’ve seen "Species," you know where this don’t-mess-with-Mother-Nature horror show is going, though director-cowriter Vincenzo Natali has a few interesting twists up his sleeve.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is no family-friendly "Peanuts" special.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Well, Ghost Protocol ultimately ends up as an eye-rollingly towering totem to L. Ron's favorite son, complete with treacly music cues and longing glances - bromantic and otherwise - that will send you screaming into the thetan-stealing clutches of Lord Xenu.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's especially disappointing when the story takes an inevitable turn to starry-eyed mush, dulling the sharp satire of the crazy, stupid ins and outs of romantic entanglement with an unconvincingly saccharine one-true-love-for-all moral.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That One Lucky Elephant ultimately comes down on the side of anthropomorphizing Flora and her kind is extremely disappointing - a little clear-eyed ambivalence would have helped the film feel more focused and less like patchwork.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's prime B-movie material put through the Ridley Scott Cuisinart.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Unfortunately, Kim nearly wrecks the film's observational acuteness with a climax that shamelessly steals from Bob Rafelson's classic blue-collar drama "Five Easy Pieces," and this faux-gut-punch finale feels haphazardly sutured on rather than arrived at organically. Guess that ham-fisted opening shot was a sign of things to come.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Often resembles a prime John Carpenter thriller--call it "Assault on Manger 13"--until an overcaffeinated angel-fu climax significantly lowers the intelligence quotient.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    More stupid movies should leave you with such a blissfully stupid smile.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The troubling turns the story takes, which are meant as a rebuke to happily-ever-after stereotypes, are much more interesting in conception than they are in execution.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmaker's work is infinitely more exhilarating when he's relieved of the need to be in any way serious. He should play dumb more often.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s still enough of merit here (particularly a movingly low-key finale that strikes just the right note of reconciliation and regret) to suggest that Porterfield has the chops to eventually hone his talents to a fine point.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Less deadpan spoof than loving act of possession, Black Dynamite near-fully channels the look and feel of its blaxploitation ancestors, warts and all.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Comparable works like John Gianvito's "Profit Motive and the Whispering Wind," or nearly anything from cine-essayist Chris Marker's oeuvre, mine similar territory much more rewardingly.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A Matrix Reloaded–like cliffhanger reminds that this is only the second installment out of four (good lord), but at least the flick leaves us with more than a tinge of interest in whom the odds will favor next.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Begins in the land of lunacy and ends up somewhere on the far side of deranged.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The rousing speeches and booming battle scenes are all well done as far as blockbuster spectacle goes, but you can't help but feel the filmmakers' resistance to the story's grimmer undercurrents.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    All the retroactively enlightened symbolism gets monotonous, and reaches an absurd apex with the introduction of a party-line newspaperman played by that scowling emblem of Teutonic depravity, Ulrich Tukur.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is still a fascinating history, especially when Limelight touches on the club scene's dark side: A lengthy dissection of the Angel Melendez murder, complete with an appearance by weathered-looking killer Michael Alig, chillingly shows how the out-all-night lifestyle can take its toll.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's almost worth wading through the wearisome setup to get to the fun stuff. But there is a reason fast-forward buttons were invented.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's numerous idiosyncrasies - virtues at the outset - ultimately suffocate it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The story's half-baked environmental themes become more prevalent as Letters from the Big Man progresses to its back-to-nature finale, which unfortunately distracts from Munch's consistently sure hand with his actors.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Crank’s Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor direct with their usual flashy brio, and basso profundo Keith David has a sublime cameo as a cop indignant at the thought of a pistachio peanut butter sandwich. It’s that kind of movie, folks.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    One senses this is a production better suited to the stage.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fans of Moulin Rouge–esque repurposing will be in hog heaven. Everyone else will want to hop that midnight train going anywhere pronto.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As the Sherlock Holmes of the second Zhou Dynasty, Lau is so effortlessly appealing that he manages to anchor the fatigue-heavy proceedings, even when his character has to outrun both the rays of the sun - don't ask - and a collapsing statue while crawling over and under a pack of stampeding horses. Now that's star power.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's secret weapon proves to be Freddy Krueger–fingernailed witch Marique, whom Rose McGowan plays with the kind of fuck-it-all brio - imagine a cross between Madeline Kahn in "History of the World: Part I" and Lady Gaga - that should garner her a Razzie and an Oscar.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A study in simplicity, perhaps too much so. The writer-director is working in the same patiently observant vein as Argentine confederate Lisandro Alonso (Liverpool), especially in the intriguing early scenes, where the adults communicate mostly through furtive glances and expertly modulated body language.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, Roth himself proves to be a fascinating presence — soft-spoken, sharp and bearing a vague air of melancholy that offsets the surrounding adulation.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Chu does his best to humanize his subject, showing him surrounded by devoted friends and family, and wringing much drama from an on-the-road vocal-cord strain.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Nicholas Wrathall’s documentary—rough-edged in style, yet anchored by pointed and poignant interviews with the man himself — is mostly for those already fascinated by Vidal’s colorful life.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, there are a good number of Yen-choreographed action scenes to break up the monotony.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As to the movie's three sections, the best comes first, as an eclectic "cast" of characters (among them philosopher Alain Badiou and musician Patti Smith) pontificate their way around a lavish Mediterranean cruise ship.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Weekend settles into an intentionally minor-key groove, caught somewhere between bracingly direct honesty and cringingly mumbly pretense.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Once the undead start walking, however, the film loses some of its footing: Most of the bloodletting is staged with quick-cut inelegance better suited to the hack horror production of your choosing, though there’s still a potent air of hopelessness that lingers as the cast is winnowed away "Ten Little Indians"–style.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The four leads more often than not transcend the material's calculated moroseness; Ivanir is especially good as a man whose perfectionist facade masks a soul in perpetual turmoil.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There are a few too many twists on this highway.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You still can't help admiring the project's ambition; an odd combo of "Babe: Pig in the City" and Godard's "Histoire(s) du cinéma," Hugo is the strangest bird to grace the multiplex in a while.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Her (Angela Ismailos) heart's in the right place, but her subjects' ruminations demand a much larger canvas.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It’s unfortunate that Stelling and his cast aren’t able to lift the story much above mawkishness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    For a while it’s a low-key fish-out-of-water comedy (with McDonald’s as one of its many obvious punch lines), then it morphs into a cumbrously sentimental tale of redemption.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    For all its surface effectiveness, however, The Blue Room never quite makes that intangible leap into greatness. It’s a phenomenally executed exercise that, like its protagonist’s memory, is too wispy for its own good.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's pure comic-book malarkey, adapted from a graphic novel by French artist Matz. But the skeletal plot affords Hill the opportunity to go atmospherically hog wild.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The falsely euphoric close is a big misstep - Pulitzers, it would seem, are the ultimate Band-Aid. What was that old adage about printing the legend?
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though the story's wrapped-with-a-bow finale is never in doubt-ol' Meathead remains a populist, pandering Hollywood man through and through-Belle Isle still manages to cast enough of an enchanting spell.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    For all the undeniable imaginativeness and visual dazzle (this is Maddin's first entirely digital feature, and it positively glistens), Keyhole ultimately comes off like a feature-length private joke that revels a bit too gleefully in its overall inscrutability. Close, Guy. But no Double Yahtzee.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It’s unfortunate that the result is so unaffecting, especially in light of all the things the director does right.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It helps that Fame has been cast with performers who have the glow of possibility about them.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Would that the climax lived up to the tension-filled first two thirds. Let’s just say that Non-Stop reaches for some pointed post-9/11 political commentary that almost entirely exceeds its grasp. Total brainlessness, in this case, would have been a virtue.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That the filmmaker at least makes a concerted effort to tweak what in most hands would be an offensively whitewashed dark-continent parable is worth some measure of praise.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is the kind of movie in which it's considered the zenith of meta-wit to have a slumming Robert De Niro (as Machete's racist politico nemesis) drive a taxi.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's hard to hate a movie that affectionately references the oeuvre of Kathryn Bigelow (both The Hurt Locker and Point Break!) and uses a whiny Third Eye Blind ballad as an acidic punch line.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The ideologies underlying Andersson’s oft-astonishing succession of extreme wide-angle, vanishing-point tableaux are a decidedly acquired taste.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's sure-to-be-brief theatrical release is a mere stopover on the way to basic-cable eternity.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Apart from the devastating material itself, some of Lapa’s aesthetic choices are extremely off-putting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Diplomacy’s origins as a play (written by Cyril Gely and starring the same actors) are always evident. Despite Schlöndorff’s attempts to give the movie some pop through widescreen lensing and noirish lighting, it’s a visually staid affair—very “filmed theater.” Fortunately, both Arestrup and Dussolier are captivating presences.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Antal and his performers’ pure B-movie esprit is undeniable.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Tony Scott almost wins us over with this fun thrill ride.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Imagine "Goodfellas" without much in the way of stakes, and you’ll get Clint Eastwood’s pleasingly square and forgettable adaptation of the Tony-feted 2006 jukebox musical.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Anderson makes often-inspiring use of the 3-D effects.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though Lemmons’s parable-like intentions are clear, almost every beat of Langston’s tale, with its absent father figures and heated gun-pointing melodrama, rings false — hardly a fitting contemporary complement to the Greatest Story Ever Told.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Smash & Grab aims to replicate the mesmeric tension of a Michael Mann thriller (the crime-cinema impresario is even explicitly referenced by one of the cops assigned to hunt down the group), though the film is so all over the place stylistically that it often seems like several different movies cut together.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is one case where there’s more life in the morgue than out.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Two monologues-one in which the Hobo compares himself to a bear, the other a Travis Bickle–like screed delivered to a roomful of increasingly distressed babies-are damn near Shakespearean. It's a shame the performance is contained in a Z-movie patchwork that's a bit too knowingly repugnant.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's so much right with Gareth Edwards's low-budget alien invasion tale that you almost want to brush aside everything that's not up to snuff.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Moment to moment, the film is gripping and beautiful to behold (props to cinematographer Masanobu Takayanagi for the mesmerizingly grainy, achromatic visuals). But caveat emptor to those expecting a hinterlands gloss on "Taken" with rapacious curs in place of nefarious Albanians.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    What begins as a tense, inventive suspense film becomes, to paraphrase Doctor Who, a wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey, mushy-wushy mess. That's decidedly NOT fantastic.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Such a feature-length bludgeoning, even in the service of basic social and scientific literacy, is truly discomfiting.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Mostly laugh-free black comedy, which gathers an impressive cast - Marisa Tomei, Jennifer Connelly and Ciarán Hinds round out the ensemble - for bad sitcom-level shenanigans.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Brühl, meanwhile, is saddled with the unenviable task of being this hollow movie’s slow-dawning voice of reason: His climactic conversation with newspaper editor David Thewlis (never worse) is one of the most embarrassingly didactic Way We Live Now™ summations ever filmed.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's just another franchise nonstarter to toss in the superstore superhero deal bin.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Weird for weirdness’s sake gets you only so far, however, and when Dupieux tries to connect all these strange goings-on to Dolph’s corporate-drone despondency, the movie takes a spurious turn toward rancid sentimentality. It seems that even a piece of dog excrement has feelings. Yuck.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Too-cutesy conceits such as Hitch's imagined conversations with serial killer Ed Gein (Michael Wincott) feebly attempt to ground the story in psychological terra firma, while horribly on-the-nose dialogue flatters those viewers who prefer to keep their sense of cinema history on fan-mag frivolous levels.

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