For 619 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 In the Family
Lowest review score: 20 47 Ronin
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 619
619 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Strangely enough, our knowledge of what’s to come makes Word Is Out that much more affecting, because it shows that there were—and are—pockets of peace amid the brutality of an ongoing civil-rights struggle.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The meanings of Close-Up shift, subtly and profoundly, with every viewing; the only certainty is that its rewards are boundless.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    It is the richly evocative performances of Marion (aggressive yet enticing) and Merhar (wearing world-weariness like an aged suit) that cut deepest.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Rohmer has a genius for taking a seemingly mundane situation and slowly tightening the screws.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The popular view of art is that it belongs to the masses. Wiseman casts a more skeptical eye, questioning such egalitarianism with cold, hard historical context. Yet he simultaneously acknowledges that these works live on far beyond their original purpose, even if, as the film’s bold, brilliant climax suggests, they may eventually play to an audience of none.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Sure it is - and a great one at that.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, Oppenheimer keeps the film focused on the highly complicated Anwar — a charismatic devil if ever there was one — observing as this strange reckoning with the past slowly breaks down his defenses.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Yun is quite simply spectacular as a woman who holds steadfastly on to her dignity and empathy, even in the face of unspeakable tragedy.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It will test your faith in humanity, but Hersonski's film is nonetheless a brilliant reminder of the importance of bearing witness.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Our fury is never directed toward concrete solutions, and that allows the guilty parties to slip, perhaps permanently, from our grasp.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    By using Laura as an avatar, Marker actually helps us see the visuals and their knotty meanings much more clearly. The more we watch, the more Laura softens, until — in a mind-bending conceit — her very status as a fictional creation is called into question. The effect is ecstatic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    What you see and hear always seems perfectly natural, even if you can't exactly say why. Who needs words when you have cinema?
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Those Dardenne brothers…still making great movies with second-nature ease.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    You could hardly ask for a more beautiful vision of souls in transit.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Never quite shakes its sitcom-ish setup. The director alternates incident-laden storytelling with penetrating character moments that her terrific cast acts to the fullest.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Godly as the monks are, they are still human-which makes their ultimate sacrifice all the more devastating.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Not a bad setup for a cops-and-robbers thriller, and in the hands of action-movie maestro Johnnie To, the result comes very close to greatness.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A moving meditation on history, knowledge and mortality.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lone Scherfig directs it all as if it were a breezy lark, so a third-act tonal shift makes for an incongruous, excessively moralistic fit with everything that’s preceded. Most insulting, though, is the way in which the climactic passages miraculously tidy up every frayed edge of Jenny’s life.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The Cold War is over, but director Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In) and his collaborators have brought those suspicion-fueled days to vivid life in this masterful adaptation of John le Carré's beloved 1974 spy novel.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Nichols has said that the idea for the film emerged from a free-floating anxiety that he sensed in the world at large, the feeling that everything we treasure in life could be lost in an instant. That sensation permeates this strikingly original movie - especially its enigmatic mind-fuck of a finale, which will haunt you for several lifetimes.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Sokurov, who also acted as director of photography, films the character and his surroundings with the eye of a newly arrived visitor to another world.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s almost impossible to describe the narrative specifics of The Past without making the movie seem ridiculously hammy. Indeed, several twists involving Samir, a dry cleaner with plenty of his own troubles, tip a bit into hoary melodramatics.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The Tree of Life enthralls right from the start.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Anderson's romantic fantasia is after something much more complicated and profound-an ever-renewing balance between the hopes of youth and the disappointments of age.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That the duo will work their way back to each other is never in doubt, although Chazelle doesn't succumb to easy sentiment. If anything, he moves too far in the other direction, aiming for a wizened ambiguity that doesn't entirely come off.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is an exquisite portrait of a family navigating the wreckage imparted to them by one of their own.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The documentary's scope feels a bit small overall - more concerned with capturing the episodic adventures of these disparate subjects than with connecting their experiences to larger societal ills.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The lengthy final two shots (each running more than ten minutes) rank among the best work this inimitable artist has ever done.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Indeed, you leave the film feeling like Wiseman has given you a glimpse of one of those ephemeral ports in a storm to which all of us retreat at times.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The question lingers as the movie comes to its triumphant body-swapping close: Is this a pro-environment parable or a prophecy of virtual realities yet to come? Cameron's new world may very well be a verdant Matrix.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It’s unfortunate that the result is so unaffecting, especially in light of all the things the director does right.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The good news is that the film's stylistic excesses don't negate the many fascinating aspects of Nim's story.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    This is Young in his playroom, grabbing his toys at random while indulging his every antimelodic whim, and Demme’s off-the-cuff approach makes for the perfect aesthetic complement.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You still can't help admiring the project's ambition; an odd combo of "Babe: Pig in the City" and Godard's "Histoire(s) du cinéma," Hugo is the strangest bird to grace the multiplex in a while.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A 25-words-or-less pitch for The Day He Arrives - shot in luminous black-and-white - might go something like: "Hong Sang-soo does Groundhog Day."
    • 83 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Reitman, who also cowrote the screenplay, feels the constant need to "deepen" his characters, granting them wants and motivations--especially during the moralistic third act--that are totally alien to how they're initially portrayed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    No side overwhelms the other in the back-and-forth; you feel more like a profoundly uncertain moment is being marked, with little concrete sense of the outcome beyond mankind's enduring hunger for moving pictures.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Moreover, the story doesn’t climax in all’s-well-that-ends-well matrimony, instead building to a beautifully bittersweet moment of self-realization, one with a light-touch profundity that would make the Bard proud.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Chomet builds this beguiling symphony of sadness to a poignant finale that does ample justice to the many layers of Tati's tale, both in text and out.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Coleman's life and work are treated as a continuum, which Clarke pulls from at will.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Wang has made a confidently intimate movie that is devastatingly larger-than-life.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Once Miller lays all his cards on the table, however, you realize you haven’t been watching people struggling with the very real temptations of unchecked privilege, so much as fumbling blindly in a glib, gloomy satire of American exceptionalism.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Though Stranger by the Lake leans a bit too heavily on its long-take, slow-cinema bona fides, there’s a clear purpose to Guiraudie’s rigorous perspective. He’s out to unearth the very potent (and often terrifying) emotions underlying every explicit act, sexual or otherwise.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    By the end, you feel curiously closer to the performer and her process without having any clue how you got there. It's exhilarating.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    An Arabic-German coproduction, it is a rare movie shot entirely in Saudi Arabia, which has no cinema industry to speak of, and the first feature by a female filmmaker from that country. Forbidden from mixing with the men in her crew, Al-Mansour often directed via walkie-talkie from the back of a van.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Toward the end of the film, a few hard-hitting cuts between young and old brings the title's meaning home: These children have an inescapable life of drudgery before them, and there's little likelihood it will change anytime soon.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    About as deep as a kiddie pool, which isn't to say it's an unpleasant frolic.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    What starts as an intriguing reverie ends as a hollow allegory.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A movie with an unflinchingly tough heart.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Writer-director Jane Campion approaches the tale with an artiste’s respectful solemnity, but it too often comes off like "Twilight" transplanted across oceans and centuries.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    No simplistic status parable. It’s more a psychological snapshot of a person forever doomed to remain a voyeur to her own life
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Weekend settles into an intentionally minor-key groove, caught somewhere between bracingly direct honesty and cringingly mumbly pretense.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A grimy kitchen-sink melodrama with an Ajax cleanser script: The muck is all surface, the turmoil cleanly shallow and contrived, though never less than gripping.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Meier is clearly carving out a path all her own; the next one should be a gem.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Skyfall has the feel of both a ceremonial commemoration and a franchise-rebooting celebration, especially in the ways it attempts to too cutely sync up the '60s-era Bond mythos (casual misogyny and all) with the more complicatedly "Bourne"-inflected recent episodes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The journey is often challenging, but the rewards—heady, emotional, provocative and invigorating—are endless.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Watching the formerly spry Harris struggle to maintain a normal life (he's frequently glassy-eyed and jacked on painkillers) emphasizes the underappreciated sacrifices our men and women in uniform make in the name of vaguely defined ideals.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is prime Woody Allen - insightful, philosophical and very funny.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Ai is a great subject for a documentary, and his charismatic certitude helps to offset Klayman's unfortunate inexperience behind the camera.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The ideologies underlying Andersson’s oft-astonishing succession of extreme wide-angle, vanishing-point tableaux are a decidedly acquired taste.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Yet it's impossible to shake the sense that what felt thrillingly, cohesively alive in the director's earlier movies plays here with more laurel-resting creakiness than go-for-broke verve. Russell's once-mercurial assets have become a formula.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is a life lived, perhaps not always well, but certainly to the fullest.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Shots of the kids and their friends running around unfamiliar environments have the fantastical qualities of Spike Jonze's "Where the Wild Things Are," minus the forced whimsy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The creepiness builds with symphonic precision until reality truly is indistinguishable from fantasy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Brava, Mia! The exceedingly talented Ms. Hansen-Løve (the writer-director of Father of My Children) is sure to win many more fans with her latest feature, an incisive, exhilaratingly frank examination of l'amour lost.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As subcultural anthropology, it’s unassailable. Yet the often ugly-looking DV aesthetic dilutes the cumulative effect.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    These characters are more than what we see on the surface, and it's thanks to Leigh's rigorous yet generous eye that we never just gawk at the drama.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The director races far too quickly to get to his ashes-to-ashes, dust-to-dust punch line. This is the film of a pretender, not a believer.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The running time may make you blanch, but Connie Field’s seven-part documentary about the history and eventual dissolution of South African apartheid is well worth the commitment.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    As in his much-lauded "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days," the latest feature from Palme d’Or–winning filmmaker Cristian Mungiu takes a rigorous approach to the material. But where the previous film — about two women seeking a back-alley abortion — was a reductively dour slog, Beyond the Hills feels more caustically all-encompassing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Given the months-long hype, what’s most bewildering about Sundance sensation Precious is its overall shrug-worthiness.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's easy to think of comics, especially time-tested ones like Rivers, as mechanical laugh-generators. Stern and Sundberg allow her to reveal the deep-rooted humanity of those ever-present quips, and the effect is humbling.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Mileage will vary from viewer to viewer as to whether this singularly eccentric movie is ultimately illuminating or enervating.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Bong is so concerned with whodunit that his creaky genre mechanics diminish Kim's determined performance.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The man himself has rarely been profiled without noticeable reluctance, though documentarians Molly Bernstein and Alan Edelstein delve fairly deep by allowing their subject to guide them where he may.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Loznitsa would have done better to embrace the story’s enigmas as opposed to explicate them.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    If Jim Jarmusch’s languorous, laconic style isn’t your bag, his stone-faced vampire comedy won’t make you a believer. Those who’ve already been bitten, however, will swoon like the film’s toothy leads whenever their lips touch neck juice.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    New Yorkers and those who've been following the neighborhood's plight know exactly how this ends; at the very least, Paravel and Sniadecki have preserved the memory of what was. Sometimes, that's the most you can do.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The movie feels like too much of a lark. To paraphrase the play’s voice of reason, Friar Francis, it would be better if Whedon paused awhile and let his counsel sway us more.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    You might actually say the documentary itself is Mohassess’s final canvas, so infused it becomes with his alternately infuriating and infectious personality.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s another fascinating entry in the director’s ongoing exploration of the sadistic and masochistic facets of human behavior.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's in between the lines that this movingly perceptive film scores a TKO.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    A dream, indeed. Sure to delight foodies and cinephiles alike.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A study in simplicity, perhaps too much so. The writer-director is working in the same patiently observant vein as Argentine confederate Lisandro Alonso (Liverpool), especially in the intriguing early scenes, where the adults communicate mostly through furtive glances and expertly modulated body language.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Filho so completely calculates his causes and effects, even going so far as to have the villain of the piece literally swimming with sharks, that you never fully feel the senses-altering charge of a truly impassioned polemic.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Polanski has made a genre piece with a verve and vitality that’s in sadly short supply.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 20 Keith Uhlich
    Christopher Isherwood’s seminal queer novel deserves a film adaptation that captures both its sense of place and its activist spirit. Cowriter-director Tom Ford settles for the glossy ephemera of a Vanity Fair cover spread.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A complex final scene — in which everyone finally lets the tears flow — only deepens the sense that well-meaning mother love can be as poisonous as it is nourishing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though the Tavianis’ intent is clear—to comment on the thin line separating part and performer, as well as on the quite literally liberating powers of art—the meanings rarely emerge with any elegance or resonance. Hardly a dish fit for the gods.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    There’s a sense that all the thematic messiness is intentional, a way for Jia to diagnose the ills of a country whose economic and social fabric is wilting under the effects of rapid modernization.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This is the kind of autumnal sentimentality that the Academy goes wild for-a (rightly) venerated performer acknowledging his own mortality by pandering to cheap-seat emotions.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    You may often find yourself second-guessing the film, questioning how—and if—it will all come together. But by the time of the intense and impassioned climax, a storm of emotion is ensured: a great movie rising before you like a delusion, like a dream.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The kids pick up the filmmakers' lyrical slack more often than not, but this ode to the power of verse could really use a redraft.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Despite his repentance, you sense that this lost soul will be confessing his sins for all eternity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Even at a mere 75 minutes, Silent Souls is thrillingly dense and allusive, and the elegiac finale maintains the overall air of mystery while beautifully bringing all the disparate threads together.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What most distinguishes the redo is the often remarkable use of 3-D: Miike turns the format's inherent limitations, especially the tendency toward visual murkiness, to his advantage, fully immersing us in a world suffused with moral and ethical rot.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There's no sense of the oppression France felt under Nazi rule. It's all just play-acting in period-specific attire. You can almost hear the AD calling lunch.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film builds to a shattering climax that works precisely because all involved fully embrace the melodrama. Be sure to bring Kleenex.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    You still leave hoping he ultimately found peace and enlightenment, two things he graciously gave to those of us who hung on his every word.

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