For 621 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done
Lowest review score: 20 No One Lives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 621
621 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The curtain can't come down fast enough.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Cheap Thrills is little more than low-budget torture porn for the doobie-addled dudebro contingent.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Best is Viggo Mortensen's William S. Burroughs proxy Old Bull Lee, holed up in a perspiration-saturated Louisiana mansion with a shell-shocked Amy Adams and a gas-huffing chamber at the ready.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The title character himself is also an unimpressive digital creation-Rogen might as well be performing his stoner-from-another-world shtick during a wee-hours movieoke session.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    False moments far outweigh the genuine ones, be it smarmy Dan’s indisputable genius (he’s such a stubble-sporting rebel, he refuses to wear suits) or the bogus anticorporate finale that leaves an especially slick aftertaste.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The thought behind this body-splattering nostalgia trip is unformed and stagnant.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmaker’s second feature is an unfortunate sophomore slump, an abrasive and opaque artist-in-crisis story that feels protracted at barely 80 minutes.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's supremely annoying to see the ups and downs of romance reduced to archer-than-arch line readings and bloodless mortal kombat. What's more frustrating is that the film, adapted from Bryan Lee O'Malley's popular comic, is an endless visual delight.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    You’re probably better off heading to an actual watering hole than patronizing Douglas Tirola’s humdrum doc on the art of the cocktail.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's all too much and not enough—a succession of disparate, can-you-top-this episodes inelegantly piling up like skidding cars on a freeway. And that's not even taking into account the action scenes. Lord, those action scenes: Monotonous, loud and relentless, they're a punishing example of the self-satisfied, digitally augmented ephemera that typifies modern Hollywood moviemaking, and House Bruckheimer in particular.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lone Scherfig directs it all as if it were a breezy lark, so a third-act tonal shift makes for an incongruous, excessively moralistic fit with everything that’s preceded. Most insulting, though, is the way in which the climactic passages miraculously tidy up every frayed edge of Jenny’s life.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    One's heart sinks the moment the trio is picked up by Prince Caspian (Barnes) and deposited on his ship, the Dawn Treader. Suddenly we're in green-screen land, where everything looks cheap, heavily digital and unfortunately postconverted to 3-D-hardly a fantastical otherworld.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Sadly, “Get out of my lab!” is not the new “Get off my plane!”
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    For an especially egregious bit of miscasting, look no further than Mena Suvari, star of this tony adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's posthumously published novel about a disintegrating marriage.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Trespass is assembly-line product through and through - unabashedly mediocre and instantly forgettable. A Joel Schumacher joint, in other words.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    So narratively old-fashioned it creaks.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lee and Schamus make history blandly palatable; in the process, they rob the times and the people they’re portraying of their complications.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As the screws turn, and the double crosses begin, the film sinks under the weight of its own ridiculousness. (The ever-reliable Cranston’s thick Euro-villain accent actually turns out to be one of the least ludicrous elements.)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    By the time Nick decides to have an emotionally purgative yard sale-the primary holdover from the short story-all the adult ambiguities have been traded in for facile Indiewood profundities.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This isn't the NASCAR-fellating cash grab that is the Cars franchise, but it's still Pixar on preachy autopilot.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As billion-dollar Hollywood franchises go, this is one of the drawn-out dumbest. The stake through the heart comes not a moment too soon.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There's no sense of the oppression France felt under Nazi rule. It's all just play-acting in period-specific attire. You can almost hear the AD calling lunch.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The badly miscalculated meat of the film is an endless parade of to-camera addresses by performers such as Lindsay Lohan, Viola Davis and Uma Thurman, all reading clumsily from Monroe's recently discovered letters and journal entries as if it were final-exam time at the Actors Studio.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Niccol's attempts at satire are toothless.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Credit the appealingly paired McAdams and Tatum for making this Valentine's-month hokum watchable.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This iron lady of cinema deserves better.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A dumb comedy out to prove its genre-defying smarts--the title is both an onscreen-supported reference to Walt Whitman and a wacky-tobaccy allusion--Leaves of Grass is a mostly mirthless affair; not even the sight of Edward Norton portraying twins tickles as it should.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The promise Dumont once showed has ossified into unholy shtick.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The true soulfulness of Sendak’s parable never emerges.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The unintentional hilarity of the whole enterprise - especially when Albert attempts to romance one of the hotel's naive employees (Wasikowska) - at least keeps you engaged, as does the scene-by-scene suspense over which pitiably wide-eyed expression Close will choose to use next. Hopefully, she's practicing her gracious-loser face for awards season.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It’s a hit-and-mostly-miss affair: For every gut-buster like McBride and Franco’s lengthy exchange about drenching each other in seminal fluid, there’s a fall-flat gag.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Writer-director Jane Campion approaches the tale with an artiste’s respectful solemnity, but it too often comes off like "Twilight" transplanted across oceans and centuries.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The characters may soar, but viewers’ spirits stay grounded.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    For all of Cloud Atlas's pseudorevolutionary blather about upending the "natural order," the execution couldn't be squarer.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The results make your head spin more than they make your spirits soar.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    If What to Expect represents the best tearjerking laugh-machine that Hollywood can birth, it's probably time to get those story ideas implanted in vitro.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It almost becomes comical to count the number of "who's holding the camera now?" reverse shots that the filmmaker haphazardly inserts to propel the story forward. Such visual ineptitude, like much else in this tediously cocky enterprise, is downright criminal.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Leaving is a tawdry potboiler slathered riotously in portent, complete with a lamebrained detour into vengeance that only Claude Chabrol would be able to pull off.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Props should be given to Rodriguez’s breathless “let’s put on a show” inventiveness. Plus, Macy and the booger--kick ass!
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As with many young-adult book-to-film series, Beautiful Creatures plays like an illustrated compendium of scenes from the novel, as opposed to a finely tuned narrative all its own.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There’s nothing more boring than a life embalmed with halfhearted Hollywood bombast, which only makes the film’s fleeting pleasures stand out all the more.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Sadly, most of the film's dull edges have to do with De Niro, who is clearly in rest-on-his-laurels mode; at his worst, he approaches radioactive, Robin Williams levels of bathos, as when Jonathan - roaring like a bush-league Lear - is banned from the shelter for bad behavior.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Charlie Victor Romeo would probably work best as a training tool for commercial airline pilots (the play, interestingly, has already been used in this fashion by the Pentagon). In a movie theater for a paying crowd, it’s little more than minimalist snuff.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Several quick-witted touches-such as a hilarious nod to Depp's role in "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas"-can't make up for Gore Verbinski's leaden direction of this digitally animated feature.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The movie amounts to little more than Marky Mark's South American Vacation.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    For a few brief moments, the film becomes something close to Greek mythology, as opposed to graphic-novel imitator. What a feeling!
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    In a word: Ugh.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As in the first film, the seasoned-pro cast provides the few fleeting pleasures to be found.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    An hour and half of comparable barbarity follows-all of it monotonous, none of it enlightening.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The film is made up of plundered parts from the "Oceans" series and "The Usual Suspects," and—like several of the forged tomes that figure in the plot — it’s a pale imitation.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Who would have thought that the man behind such wackadoo fantasies as "The Professional" and "The Fifth Element" was capable of being so bloody boring?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Don’t look to this skin-deep biopic to offer any insights beyond the head-slappingly superficial.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Only Jones seems most at home, striking just the right note of low-key malevolence. You’d follow him anywhere — maybe even into a better movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As with many a first feature, Gordon-Levitt’s so-so directorial debut is pumped up with ambition. The early scenes, heavy on caricature, promise to puncture much of the cocky illusions surrounding modern relationships.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though the Tavianis’ intent is clear—to comment on the thin line separating part and performer, as well as on the quite literally liberating powers of art—the meanings rarely emerge with any elegance or resonance. Hardly a dish fit for the gods.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The main talking point of this empty-headed thriller from Mexican director Amat Escalante is a sure-to-be-notorious instance of penis incineration — a dubious distinction.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Despite the chronological juggling, the film's stylistic debts (a Hitchcock flashback borrowed from Stage Fright, a Bertolucci-esque apartment sequence that could be titled Last Tango in Auschwitz) are simplistic to a fault; they lack the multifaceted suspense and sensuality typified by those directors at their best.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The stylistic conceit of keeping us entirely with the clones (so that we are as ill-informed as they are and never get to meet their powerful oppressors) only reveals what an empty-headed abstraction this tale was from both page and frame one
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Things quickly fall apart, with a pileup of sub–Rod Serling narrative twists, a choppy action sequence heavy on the Michael Bay slo-mo and a sequel-ready climax that reveals the whole project as little more than a feature-length calling card.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There's more than a few things off in this tale of a disillusioned professional thief (Affleck, dull), his unlikely inamorata (Hall, wasted) and the determined FBI agent (Hamm, solid) out to apprehend him.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It’s a neurotic treatise that simply adds to our cultural dementia instead of illuminating it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It’s only when the sentient snacks are front and center that this middling sequel to the 2009 animated hit truly comes alive.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The more the visual ephemera piles up, the more the emotional thrust of the story gets buried beneath all the monotonous pageantry. (Anna's many tête-à-têtes with her two lovers - especially a should-be-dizzying dance-seduction scene - are frigid pomp without any real heat.)
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    By the time the film takes a glib turn into role-switching farce - as Muslims become Christians and Christians become Muslims - the overall toothlessness of the satire becomes damningly apparent.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Director-cinematographer Steven Soderbergh’s indifference to the material is palpable and of a piece with his deathly dull output of late.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This is little more than an expensive-looking celebrity vacation video—more evidence in support of the notion that the Hollywood house always wins.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Irritated, you realize you've been watching an object that's all surface, no soul.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Clearly there's a lot of myth-dispelling to do; indeed, the film often seems like a public-service announcement wrapped around a sketchy narrative skeleton.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    What starts as an intriguing reverie ends as a hollow allegory.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, a few striking sequences break up the tedium.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Notwithstanding Brown's occasional half-baked critical comment about the sport's corporatization, the film ends up as a cliquish circle jerk that flatters those in the know and leaves neophytes little to mull over.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The tone never stops waffling, and nothing truly revelatory ever emerges about those terrible few days in Texas. What we’re left with is the Disney theme-park version of history — all waxworks and weepiness.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There’s a ruthlessly effective movie to be made from this material, and you couldn’t hope for a better performer than Shannon, who can turn on a dime between quiet malevolence and volcanic rage, to inhabit the sociopathic central figure. Unfortunately, this overproduced biopic constantly counteracts the actor’s committed efforts with its pale-imitation slickness.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    All the problematic aspects of the Hollywood bad boy's filmography - reactionary rah-rah patriotism, sneer 'n' drool female fetishization, callously detached bloodletting - remain in soul-shattering force.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Only Gandolfini comes off as a character as opposed to an effigy, his sad-sack posture and f-it-all unprofessionalism truly capturing the tragedy of a working man with a one-way ticket to 99-percenter hell.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lay the Favorite is frenzied without being funny. Like Judy Holliday on a particularly manic day, Hall tears from scene to scene with a bubbly effervescence that is technically impressive yet increasingly exhausting.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There’s little that can be done with material wrung of its complications to accommodate an ultimately life-affirming, it-all-works-out agenda.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Let’s not dance around it: Nine--is a dud.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Credit Broderick and the cast for putting across the fey Indiewood bullcrap with committed, nearly convincing effort.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The sole saving grace of this treacly middlebrow dross is the naturally sweet chemistry between Brosnan and Dyrholm. In the few scenes in which they’re alone together, wistfully recalling the past and discussing various misfortunes, you glimpse a much deeper movie.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lynskey has raised the quality of innumerable feature films (as a soft-spoken New Republic reporter in Shattered Glass; a housewife on the verge of a nervous breakdown in Away We Go-that film's sole saving grace). So it's a delight to see this stalwart character actor move to center stage, even when the result is so by-the-numbers.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Whether blithely comparing American prisons to retirement homes or gleefully recalling the time he chewed off his own fingers in Siberia, the moonlighting German New Wave auteur injects some much-needed black humor into what is otherwise a soporific star vehicle.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though both lead actors are able to coast for a while on their natural charm, it's evident by the soppy finale that their "Sleepless in Seattle" and "Pretty Woman" salad days are long past.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Writer-director Nick Tomnay needlessly convolutes what should have been a taut, focused two-hander with flashbacks, alternate realities and too-clever-by-half reversals.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    360
    Scene by scene, you want to laugh at all the ham-fisted kismet, even if the committed cast holds your attention. Hopkins is especially good in his chaste May-September interactions with Flor, and he has an AA confessional that is genuinely moving.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Injecting a devil-may-care attitude into a franchise-focused blockbuster only gets you so far. When all is said and done, this wasp's got no sting.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Winterbottom’s inability to bring off this lurid stew of sex and violence is one problem; his (mis)direction of Affleck is another.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    That all sours by the time of the film's "shocking" climax, which is so hilariously telegraphed, it plays like a Benny Hill gag rather than a tear-duct stoker.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The movie builds to a particularly deflating anticlimax, passing over an inevitably apocalyptic confrontation between spheres with a wink-wink, nudge-nudge bit of dialogue that’s like a rejected punchline from a Douglas Adams novel.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    What we’re left with are a bunch of unseasoned performers and a first-time filmmaker clearly out of his depth (good lord, those green-screen shots!) hocking loogies at Mickey and friends with hit-and-mostly-miss fervidness.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The highlight, though, is Julie Christie as Grandma, whose GILFy gorgeousness (especially in the "better to eat you with" scene) is the only thing in this overblown campfest with real teeth.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This is mostly all reefer, no madness.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Whenever this Lantern returns to terra firma (too often), its imaginative flights are ground down under the Warners overlords' demographic-pandering heels.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The cast to die for is almost entirely wasted in this machismo-marinated slab of Brit-crime nastiness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Simon Curtis's watchably third-rate biopic doesn't try to sort out truth from fabrication; that would be like "teaching Urdu to a badger," as the short-tempered Olivier - played by a whole-hog-slicing Branagh - might say. Better to print the legend and be done with it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Spencer, a superb performer mainly known for small character parts, gives a star-making turn as the won't-take-no-guff Minny.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A Jerry Bruckheimer–produced video-game adaptation--it has to be good, doesn’t it? (Ya, sarcasm.)
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Kilcher makes the slog worthwhile--her face gleams with possibility, even in the character’s darkest moments--though one prays she escapes the typecasting trap ASAP.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's a pleasure to watch the granite-faced action star do his own stunts, particularly a death-defying leap from a bridge. Yet everything feels hurried.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Cluzet and Sy nonetheless make for ingratiating foils; the extended opening sequence in which the duo outwits a pair of cops like a hell-raising Laurel and Hardy could be a stellar short comedy if it weren't married to the deadly self-serious shtick that follows.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Despite a committed performance from Palminteri (ripping through scenes like an aged bulldog), Debbie Goodstein's loosely autobiographical drama is as nondescript as made-for-pennies independents come.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A better movie would have explored Foster's way-of-the-future objectives with more beyond-the-hype insight and less Zen-master bullshit.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The film has the look of unflinching truth, yet it too often feels like a calculated ploy to stoke viewers' liberal-guilty consciences.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This routine animated feature is a perfectly fine thing to waste.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The satire becomes more scattershot and strangely cuddlesome (didja know sequestered holy men enjoy socializing and playing sports, just like us?), while the usually great Piccoli-saddled with a ridiculously contrived failed-actor backstory-comes off like an unholy mix of Gérard Depardieu and Robin Williams at their sad-puppiest. That's some cinematic blasphemy, Moretti.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A grimy kitchen-sink melodrama with an Ajax cleanser script: The muck is all surface, the turmoil cleanly shallow and contrived, though never less than gripping.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This is a man-versus-nature parable heavy on the sappy existentialism that's very much of our time. Call it Nicholas Sparks's The Grey.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A slipshod documentary about a fascinating subject: the loaded history and current complications of African-American hairstyling.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though it holds your attention all the way through to an enigmatic, spiritually tinged climax, the movie leaves you wanting more than the Vega Vidals' secondhand artistry is able to provide.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    2 Guns quickly degenerates into boilerplate Hollywood sound and fury, complete with a climactic Mexican standoff that revolves around a massive, burning pile of money. Irony, thou art lost.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Plays like a tiresomely extended evening of channel surfing.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This 3-D cave-diving adventure plays on a lot of fears, so avoid it if you have an aversion to claustrophobia, drowning or really bad acting.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The story — aside from a climax that plays like a too-knowing rebuke to Disney formula — goes tediously through the motions. It isn’t only Papa Walt’s head that’s been put on ice.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This is the kind of autumnal sentimentality that the Academy goes wild for-a (rightly) venerated performer acknowledging his own mortality by pandering to cheap-seat emotions.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The script—which Jones, Kieran Fitzgerald and Wesley Oliver adapted from Glendon Swarthout's 1988 novel—shifts uneasily between tragedy and comedy.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Cue those weepy violins. Indeed, you get everything you'd expect from this mostly saccharine melodrama.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Sontag’s true talent was for the printed word; behind the camera, her limitations come more harshly to light. Upon Promised Land’s release, she recounted her experiences in Vogue--an all-too-appropriate forum since her film is mostly chic posturing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The film slowly loses the sobering toughness of its initial inquiry, and finally comes off as bloodline-biased hagiography.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Jolie must eventually become a comic-book supergirl impervious to explosions and bullets, all the better to set up a "Bourne"-like franchise by the final fade-out.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Once Miller lays all his cards on the table, however, you realize you haven’t been watching people struggling with the very real temptations of unchecked privilege, so much as fumbling blindly in a glib, gloomy satire of American exceptionalism.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The director races far too quickly to get to his ashes-to-ashes, dust-to-dust punch line. This is the film of a pretender, not a believer.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    One wrongheaded jaw-dropper follows another.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Hop
    The various plot threads-E.B. is pursued by a trio of ass-kickingly cute long-eared operatives; a disgruntled worker chick (voiced in emphatic Telemundo tones by Hank Azaria) orchestrates a coup d'état-mostly get lost amid all the allusions. Even Hugh Hefner pops up because, you know, Playboy Bunnies.

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