For 600 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Neil Young Trunk Show
Lowest review score: 20 Art & Copy
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 600
600 movie reviews
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Trespass is assembly-line product through and through - unabashedly mediocre and instantly forgettable. A Joel Schumacher joint, in other words.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Madden pads the film with shimmering images of Jaipur and its surroundings; a midmovie funeral sequence - 'cause somebody's got to kick the bucket! - even manages to be somewhat evocative and moving. The rest makes you long for senility to set in, but quick.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The unintentional hilarity of the whole enterprise - especially when Albert attempts to romance one of the hotel's naive employees (Wasikowska) - at least keeps you engaged, as does the scene-by-scene suspense over which pitiably wide-eyed expression Close will choose to use next. Hopefully, she's practicing her gracious-loser face for awards season.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    By the time Nick decides to have an emotionally purgative yard sale-the primary holdover from the short story-all the adult ambiguities have been traded in for facile Indiewood profundities.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Simon Curtis's watchably third-rate biopic doesn't try to sort out truth from fabrication; that would be like "teaching Urdu to a badger," as the short-tempered Olivier - played by a whole-hog-slicing Branagh - might say. Better to print the legend and be done with it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Ceremony passes by quickly and painlessly, its annoyances easily forgotten. On the plus side, Thurman and Angarano do work up a sweet odd-pair chemistry.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Good actors like Vera Farmiga and Brendan Gleeson show up to bust balls and bark expository dialogue with check-in-the-bank-yet? proficiency. Add in a couple of dully pro forma narrative twists to keep you awake in between shots of distractingly exotic South African scenery, and you've got a first-quarter Hollywood release par excellence. Meaning not.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Credit the appealingly paired McAdams and Tatum for making this Valentine's-month hokum watchable.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    That all sours by the time of the film's "shocking" climax, which is so hilariously telegraphed, it plays like a Benny Hill gag rather than a tear-duct stoker.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The movie amounts to little more than Marky Mark's South American Vacation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The director races far too quickly to get to his ashes-to-ashes, dust-to-dust punch line. This is the film of a pretender, not a believer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The voice work sounds more quick-paycheck than impassioned, and the animation rarely rises above video-game cut-scene quality. As revisionist holiday fables go, you're better off watching Aardman's delightful "Arthur Christmas" than this lump of coal.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Aside from a few inspired vistas and alien life-forms (the Road Runner–fast red planet dog Woola is sure to sell a bazillion action figures), John Carter is as deadly dull as its basso-voiced, beefcake slab of a star, Taylor Kitsch.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This isn't the NASCAR-fellating cash grab that is the Cars franchise, but it's still Pixar on preachy autopilot.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Aside from a few witty Looney Tunes–esque sight gags, such as one hilarious image of a woolly mammoth being swallowed up by the tectonically shifting earth, the stereoscopic visuals are a busy, personality-free digital blur.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This was Italy's official submission for Best Foreign Film to the 2011 Academy Awards (a red flag more often than not), and, sure enough there's little here that rises above middlebrow.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Writer-director Nick Tomnay needlessly convolutes what should have been a taut, focused two-hander with flashbacks, alternate realities and too-clever-by-half reversals.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Mostly laugh-free black comedy, which gathers an impressive cast - Marisa Tomei, Jennifer Connelly and Ciarán Hinds round out the ensemble - for bad sitcom-level shenanigans.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though it holds your attention all the way through to an enigmatic, spiritually tinged climax, the movie leaves you wanting more than the Vega Vidals' secondhand artistry is able to provide.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The movie builds to a particularly deflating anticlimax, passing over an inevitably apocalyptic confrontation between spheres with a wink-wink, nudge-nudge bit of dialogue that’s like a rejected punchline from a Douglas Adams novel.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    If What to Expect represents the best tearjerking laugh-machine that Hollywood can birth, it's probably time to get those story ideas implanted in vitro.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There is no depth or resonance to anything we see and hear-everything is as it seems, no more, no less, and the reactionary superficiality dulls the senses. General Orders No. 9 strains for elegiac profundity and ends up as bad, backward-looking poetry.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Plays like a tiresomely extended evening of channel surfing.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Much cut-rate melodrama ensues, none of it particularly painful to watch, until a ridiculously redemptive finale negates almost all of the preceding dramatic tension and resurrects a cloying Richard Marx chestnut to boot.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's all too much and not enough—a succession of disparate, can-you-top-this episodes inelegantly piling up like skidding cars on a freeway. And that's not even taking into account the action scenes. Lord, those action scenes: Monotonous, loud and relentless, they're a punishing example of the self-satisfied, digitally augmented ephemera that typifies modern Hollywood moviemaking, and House Bruckheimer in particular.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This iron lady of cinema deserves better.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    At least the Abrams-helmed Star Trek from 2009 had a pretzel-logic playfulness; the portentously subtitled Into Darkness is attempting like hell to be a Trek for our troubled times. The franchise has been thoroughly Christopher Nolan–ized.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The film doesn't come within spitting distance of vintage Landis, e.g., "Animal House" or "An American Werewolf in London." But at least it's not "The Stupids."
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    So narratively old-fashioned it creaks.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Who would have thought that the man behind such wackadoo fantasies as "The Professional" and "The Fifth Element" was capable of being so bloody boring?