For 619 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974)
Lowest review score: 20 Left Behind
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 619
619 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Yun is quite simply spectacular as a woman who holds steadfastly on to her dignity and empathy, even in the face of unspeakable tragedy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This lifelong Tintin fan was more than pleased, even while having to acknowledge that the movie lacks the subtle state-of-the-world commentary that Hergé often smuggled into his creation.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A movie with an unflinchingly tough heart.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It never feels as if we're watching a brand-name cash-grab, but instead as if we're participating in an endlessly imaginative afternoon of play.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Godly as the monks are, they are still human-which makes their ultimate sacrifice all the more devastating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It would be a Christmas miracle save for one lump of coal: an ear-shattering Justin Bieber song over the end credits. Gotta sell something to the kids at Yuletide.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is an exquisite portrait of a family navigating the wreckage imparted to them by one of their own.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Too many movies come to us as preordained cult objects - this is the real deal.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is prime Woody Allen - insightful, philosophical and very funny.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film builds to a shattering climax that works precisely because all involved fully embrace the melodrama. Be sure to bring Kleenex.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film suddenly gains in power, until it fulfills the promise of its title with hard-hitting compassion and a crystal-clear sense of grace.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A moving meditation on history, knowledge and mortality.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    New Yorkers and those who've been following the neighborhood's plight know exactly how this ends; at the very least, Paravel and Sniadecki have preserved the memory of what was. Sometimes, that's the most you can do.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Skyfall has the feel of both a ceremonial commemoration and a franchise-rebooting celebration, especially in the ways it attempts to too cutely sync up the '60s-era Bond mythos (casual misogyny and all) with the more complicatedly "Bourne"-inflected recent episodes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Anderson's romantic fantasia is after something much more complicated and profound-an ever-renewing balance between the hopes of youth and the disappointments of age.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It's an equally insightful and excruciating journey, with our quip-ready protagonist perpetually caught between two modes: eager-to-please caffeinated and near-breakdown frustrated.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film isn't blinded by Candy's beauty and celebrity; it digs critically, if still empathetically, beneath.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A lesser movie might hammer home the idea that the cult squashes Martha's sense of self. This distinctive and haunting effort implies something much scarier: that there is no self to start with.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    As engrossing as it is maddening, Pierre Thoretton's documentary on the sale of Yves Saint Laurent's extensive art collection is perched somewhere between a sanded-edged official portrait and a keen examination of affluence run amok.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Sensitive parents shouldn't fret; this is the kind of grim fairy tale, equal parts midnight-movie macabre and family-round-the-hearth compassionate, that scars in all the right ways.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The mostly dialogue-free middle section is a scare-film master class - and when a becalmed smile does finally cross his lips, it's in the most giddily mordant of circumstances. As Arthur embraces the darkness, so does the darkness embrace us.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    A mesmerizing study in excess, Peter Jackson and company's long-awaited prequel to the Lord of the Rings saga is bursting with surplus characters, wall-to-wall special effects, unapologetically drawn-out story tangents and double the frame rate (48 over 24) of the average movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    By the time the beast spreads his wings to full span, soaring skyward toward a vaguely Spielbergian moon, you’re in the kind of breathless awe that so few current cinematic superproductions are able to provide.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This fascinatingly knotty movie never becomes a facile screed against the powers that be. Instead, it plays as a more relaxed and leisurely requiem for a slowly vanishing way of life, with sounds and images-a time-lapse contemplation of the cosmos is in the running for scene of the year-that are as mesmerizing as they are subtly pointed.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Every monster-movie archetype is here, from nerdy scientists (Charlie Day and Burn Gorman) to hard-stare leaders (Idris Elba) with a penchant for 11th-hour inspirational speeches. (Watching the former Stringer Bell bellow about “canceling the apocalypse!” is one of those great, giddy pleasures you didn’t know you needed.)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Leigh does a stellar job of showing how these events seep into the unaware girl's everyday existence - almost all of the film's sequences are photographed in precisely composed, inherently surreal single shots.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Jendreyko elegantly sketches in the details of his subject's life and the historical events surrounding her coming-of-age-out of which emerges a fascinating subtext about the malleable powers of language.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The impressively lean script by Alex Garland (28 Days Later) is shorn of almost all superfluity beyond a few dud Schwarzeneggeresque kiss-offs, while Anthony Dod Mantle's sensational widescreen cinematography harkens back to the tension-inducing inventiveness of early John Carpenter.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmaking is patient and participatory, getting down in the dirt with the workers (in one case the lens is even soaked by a spray of sludge) and allowing several touchingly distinct personalities to emerge.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Even at a mere 75 minutes, Silent Souls is thrillingly dense and allusive, and the elegiac finale maintains the overall air of mystery while beautifully bringing all the disparate threads together.

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