For 621 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The Headless Woman
Lowest review score: 20 Jonah Hex
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 621
621 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    That One Lucky Elephant ultimately comes down on the side of anthropomorphizing Flora and her kind is extremely disappointing - a little clear-eyed ambivalence would have helped the film feel more focused and less like patchwork.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's prime B-movie material put through the Ridley Scott Cuisinart.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Unfortunately, Kim nearly wrecks the film's observational acuteness with a climax that shamelessly steals from Bob Rafelson's classic blue-collar drama "Five Easy Pieces," and this faux-gut-punch finale feels haphazardly sutured on rather than arrived at organically. Guess that ham-fisted opening shot was a sign of things to come.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Often resembles a prime John Carpenter thriller--call it "Assault on Manger 13"--until an overcaffeinated angel-fu climax significantly lowers the intelligence quotient.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    More stupid movies should leave you with such a blissfully stupid smile.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The troubling turns the story takes, which are meant as a rebuke to happily-ever-after stereotypes, are much more interesting in conception than they are in execution.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmaker's work is infinitely more exhilarating when he's relieved of the need to be in any way serious. He should play dumb more often.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s still enough of merit here (particularly a movingly low-key finale that strikes just the right note of reconciliation and regret) to suggest that Porterfield has the chops to eventually hone his talents to a fine point.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Less deadpan spoof than loving act of possession, Black Dynamite near-fully channels the look and feel of its blaxploitation ancestors, warts and all.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Comparable works like John Gianvito's "Profit Motive and the Whispering Wind," or nearly anything from cine-essayist Chris Marker's oeuvre, mine similar territory much more rewardingly.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A Matrix Reloaded–like cliffhanger reminds that this is only the second installment out of four (good lord), but at least the flick leaves us with more than a tinge of interest in whom the odds will favor next.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Begins in the land of lunacy and ends up somewhere on the far side of deranged.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The rousing speeches and booming battle scenes are all well done as far as blockbuster spectacle goes, but you can't help but feel the filmmakers' resistance to the story's grimmer undercurrents.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    All the retroactively enlightened symbolism gets monotonous, and reaches an absurd apex with the introduction of a party-line newspaperman played by that scowling emblem of Teutonic depravity, Ulrich Tukur.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is still a fascinating history, especially when Limelight touches on the club scene's dark side: A lengthy dissection of the Angel Melendez murder, complete with an appearance by weathered-looking killer Michael Alig, chillingly shows how the out-all-night lifestyle can take its toll.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's almost worth wading through the wearisome setup to get to the fun stuff. But there is a reason fast-forward buttons were invented.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's numerous idiosyncrasies - virtues at the outset - ultimately suffocate it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The story's half-baked environmental themes become more prevalent as Letters from the Big Man progresses to its back-to-nature finale, which unfortunately distracts from Munch's consistently sure hand with his actors.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Crank’s Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor direct with their usual flashy brio, and basso profundo Keith David has a sublime cameo as a cop indignant at the thought of a pistachio peanut butter sandwich. It’s that kind of movie, folks.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    One senses this is a production better suited to the stage.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fans of Moulin Rouge–esque repurposing will be in hog heaven. Everyone else will want to hop that midnight train going anywhere pronto.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As the Sherlock Holmes of the second Zhou Dynasty, Lau is so effortlessly appealing that he manages to anchor the fatigue-heavy proceedings, even when his character has to outrun both the rays of the sun - don't ask - and a collapsing statue while crawling over and under a pack of stampeding horses. Now that's star power.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film's secret weapon proves to be Freddy Krueger–fingernailed witch Marique, whom Rose McGowan plays with the kind of fuck-it-all brio - imagine a cross between Madeline Kahn in "History of the World: Part I" and Lady Gaga - that should garner her a Razzie and an Oscar.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A study in simplicity, perhaps too much so. The writer-director is working in the same patiently observant vein as Argentine confederate Lisandro Alonso (Liverpool), especially in the intriguing early scenes, where the adults communicate mostly through furtive glances and expertly modulated body language.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, Roth himself proves to be a fascinating presence — soft-spoken, sharp and bearing a vague air of melancholy that offsets the surrounding adulation.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Chu does his best to humanize his subject, showing him surrounded by devoted friends and family, and wringing much drama from an on-the-road vocal-cord strain.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Nicholas Wrathall’s documentary—rough-edged in style, yet anchored by pointed and poignant interviews with the man himself — is mostly for those already fascinated by Vidal’s colorful life.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately, there are a good number of Yen-choreographed action scenes to break up the monotony.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As to the movie's three sections, the best comes first, as an eclectic "cast" of characters (among them philosopher Alain Badiou and musician Patti Smith) pontificate their way around a lavish Mediterranean cruise ship.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Weekend settles into an intentionally minor-key groove, caught somewhere between bracingly direct honesty and cringingly mumbly pretense.

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