For 621 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Jiro Dreams of Sushi
Lowest review score: 20 Remember Me
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 621
621 movie reviews
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though based partly on actual events, Ruben Fleischer's ludicrous shoot-'em-up plays fast and loose with the facts, and plenty else besides.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The curtain can't come down fast enough.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Cheap Thrills is little more than low-budget torture porn for the doobie-addled dudebro contingent.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Best is Viggo Mortensen's William S. Burroughs proxy Old Bull Lee, holed up in a perspiration-saturated Louisiana mansion with a shell-shocked Amy Adams and a gas-huffing chamber at the ready.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The title character himself is also an unimpressive digital creation-Rogen might as well be performing his stoner-from-another-world shtick during a wee-hours movieoke session.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    False moments far outweigh the genuine ones, be it smarmy Dan’s indisputable genius (he’s such a stubble-sporting rebel, he refuses to wear suits) or the bogus anticorporate finale that leaves an especially slick aftertaste.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The thought behind this body-splattering nostalgia trip is unformed and stagnant.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmaker’s second feature is an unfortunate sophomore slump, an abrasive and opaque artist-in-crisis story that feels protracted at barely 80 minutes.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's supremely annoying to see the ups and downs of romance reduced to archer-than-arch line readings and bloodless mortal kombat. What's more frustrating is that the film, adapted from Bryan Lee O'Malley's popular comic, is an endless visual delight.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    You’re probably better off heading to an actual watering hole than patronizing Douglas Tirola’s humdrum doc on the art of the cocktail.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's all too much and not enough—a succession of disparate, can-you-top-this episodes inelegantly piling up like skidding cars on a freeway. And that's not even taking into account the action scenes. Lord, those action scenes: Monotonous, loud and relentless, they're a punishing example of the self-satisfied, digitally augmented ephemera that typifies modern Hollywood moviemaking, and House Bruckheimer in particular.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lone Scherfig directs it all as if it were a breezy lark, so a third-act tonal shift makes for an incongruous, excessively moralistic fit with everything that’s preceded. Most insulting, though, is the way in which the climactic passages miraculously tidy up every frayed edge of Jenny’s life.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    One's heart sinks the moment the trio is picked up by Prince Caspian (Barnes) and deposited on his ship, the Dawn Treader. Suddenly we're in green-screen land, where everything looks cheap, heavily digital and unfortunately postconverted to 3-D-hardly a fantastical otherworld.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Sadly, “Get out of my lab!” is not the new “Get off my plane!”
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    For an especially egregious bit of miscasting, look no further than Mena Suvari, star of this tony adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's posthumously published novel about a disintegrating marriage.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Trespass is assembly-line product through and through - unabashedly mediocre and instantly forgettable. A Joel Schumacher joint, in other words.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    So narratively old-fashioned it creaks.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lee and Schamus make history blandly palatable; in the process, they rob the times and the people they’re portraying of their complications.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As the screws turn, and the double crosses begin, the film sinks under the weight of its own ridiculousness. (The ever-reliable Cranston’s thick Euro-villain accent actually turns out to be one of the least ludicrous elements.)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    By the time Nick decides to have an emotionally purgative yard sale-the primary holdover from the short story-all the adult ambiguities have been traded in for facile Indiewood profundities.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This isn't the NASCAR-fellating cash grab that is the Cars franchise, but it's still Pixar on preachy autopilot.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As billion-dollar Hollywood franchises go, this is one of the drawn-out dumbest. The stake through the heart comes not a moment too soon.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There's no sense of the oppression France felt under Nazi rule. It's all just play-acting in period-specific attire. You can almost hear the AD calling lunch.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The badly miscalculated meat of the film is an endless parade of to-camera addresses by performers such as Lindsay Lohan, Viola Davis and Uma Thurman, all reading clumsily from Monroe's recently discovered letters and journal entries as if it were final-exam time at the Actors Studio.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Niccol's attempts at satire are toothless.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Credit the appealingly paired McAdams and Tatum for making this Valentine's-month hokum watchable.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This iron lady of cinema deserves better.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A dumb comedy out to prove its genre-defying smarts--the title is both an onscreen-supported reference to Walt Whitman and a wacky-tobaccy allusion--Leaves of Grass is a mostly mirthless affair; not even the sight of Edward Norton portraying twins tickles as it should.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The promise Dumont once showed has ossified into unholy shtick.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The true soulfulness of Sendak’s parable never emerges.

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