For 619 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Neil Young Journeys
Lowest review score: 20 Couples Retreat
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 619
619 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Maier’s images are truly stunning—vivid documents of the working class that are off-the-cuff yet rigorously composed, always capturing that enigmatic bit of her subject’s soul that leaves you in spine-tingled awe.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Director Christian Carion (Merry Christmas) establishes a low-key yet threatening atmosphere right from the start, and gets terrific performances from Kusturica and Canet.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It never feels as if we're watching a brand-name cash-grab, but instead as if we're participating in an endlessly imaginative afternoon of play.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The story — aside from a climax that plays like a too-knowing rebuke to Disney formula — goes tediously through the motions. It isn’t only Papa Walt’s head that’s been put on ice.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmakers do a good job of laying out the whos, whys and wheres through diagrams, reenactments and testimonials from veterans on both sides of the skirmish.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There's more than a few things off in this tale of a disillusioned professional thief (Affleck, dull), his unlikely inamorata (Hall, wasted) and the determined FBI agent (Hamm, solid) out to apprehend him.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There's enough filmmaking talent evident throughout that you wish the journey were more satisfying overall.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The uniformly showy performances (Acting with a capital ‘A’) are what do in Prisoners more than anything.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    This time around, the director documents a 2011 Young solo show in Toronto (the musician's birthplace), but in an intentionally fractured way.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    What begins as a tense, inventive suspense film becomes, to paraphrase Doctor Who, a wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey, mushy-wushy mess. That's decidedly NOT fantastic.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Joe
    Yet Green, as is his wont, too often strains for poetic effect through flowery voiceover and tone-deaf interactions — like those between Joe and his latest short-term girlfriend — that undercut the genuineness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    West is far more adept at and interested in sustaining an unrelentingly ominous mood than in executing the genre-required spook shocks.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Well, Ghost Protocol ultimately ends up as an eye-rollingly towering totem to L. Ron's favorite son, complete with treacly music cues and longing glances - bromantic and otherwise - that will send you screaming into the thetan-stealing clutches of Lord Xenu.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    The most impressive aspect of Breillat’s feature is that it agitates like the best fairy tales, seducing us with otherworldliness before sticking the knife in and permanently inscribing the moral.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is a movie about a subculture, made for that subculture; only hard-core Xboxers need apply.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The brotherly-love epiphany to which the film builds does effectively pluck the heartstrings, but there’s a lingering sense that we’re being had.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The subjects - a husband and wife struggling to make ends meet, mostly for the well-being of their infant daughter - are eminently engaging.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Uhlich
    Filmmakers from Jacques Rivette to Hou Hsiao-hsien have treated the City of Light like Alice’s rabbit hole; writer-director Hong Sang-soo similarly embraces the fantasy, but goes one step further in this extraordinary character study by fully erasing the line that separates the actual from the fictional.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Intrigue and eroticism abound, all of it watchable, none of it particularly exciting. And the misty widescreen photography lends the proceedings a funereal air of respectability that's like catnip to Oscar voters.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The filmmaking is patient and participatory, getting down in the dirt with the workers (in one case the lens is even soaked by a spray of sludge) and allowing several touchingly distinct personalities to emerge.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Hollywood movies have rarely spoken such tough and tender truths.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's fascinating to be so close to a then-sitting head of state as he negotiates for his homeland's survival, and the news that Nasheed was recently deposed in a coup by Gayoom loyalists makes the hard-won victories he did secure all the more poignant.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Gould is as much of a mystery at the end as at the beginning. You get the feeling that's the way he'd have wanted it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Though the film wraps up its spinning-plates narrative a little too neatly, this is still a Scandi-noir to die for.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Diplomacy’s origins as a play (written by Cyril Gely and starring the same actors) are always evident. Despite Schlöndorff’s attempts to give the movie some pop through widescreen lensing and noirish lighting, it’s a visually staid affair—very “filmed theater.” Fortunately, both Arestrup and Dussolier are captivating presences.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    For all its surface effectiveness, however, The Blue Room never quite makes that intangible leap into greatness. It’s a phenomenally executed exercise that, like its protagonist’s memory, is too wispy for its own good.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    A slipshod documentary about a fascinating subject: the loaded history and current complications of African-American hairstyling.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It’s nice to see this great filmmaker sculpting something that feels genuinely revelatory. That’s not to say that the 3-D Goodbye to Language is always an easy sit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Sensitive parents shouldn't fret; this is the kind of grim fairy tale, equal parts midnight-movie macabre and family-round-the-hearth compassionate, that scars in all the right ways.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The oft-hilarious push-and-pull between director and subject - Williams wryly notes that the film is turning into "the Steve and Paulie Show" - effectively hacks away at the celebrity-enthusiast divide. By the end of this perceptive dual portrait, both men are content to merely be human.

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