For 562 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Neil Young Trunk Show
Lowest review score: 20 Knight and Day
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 42 out of 562
562 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Disney knows how to bewitch a crowd, but the sense that Tangled was made more by corporate mandate than artistic spark remains constant throughout.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Tediousness sets in eventually; there's only so much zoological abyss-gazing one can do.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fincher's film tips much more in the indulging direction of crowd Comic-Con - delighting the franchise junkie above all other considerations.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Yet it still works like gangbusters - tears will be stifled by the end of the sibling vs. sibling finale - and most of the credit should go to Hardy, Nolte and Edgerton.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The true soulfulness of Sendak’s parable never emerges.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Inventive yet exhausting tale of two circus clowns.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The real beauty of Maidentrip is how it downplays the go-for-glory aspect of the tale (this adolescent mariner’s aim is to become the youngest person ever to sail around the world) to focus on more earthly matters like the isolation and loneliness of the voyage or the lingering effects of the divorce that irrevocably shaped Dekker’s life.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Such a feature-length bludgeoning, even in the service of basic social and scientific literacy, is truly discomfiting.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The film lurches through narrative incidents: Battle scenes, political intrigue and a ticking-time-bomb love triangle are all pitched at the level of mundane competence and rarely get the blood racing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Mouth’s dubious legacy and his many off-camera complications are examined with a coarse affection of which he himself would surely approve.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Spelling may not be Quentin Tarantino’s forte, but his grasp of language (both verbal and visual) is peerless.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The stylistic conceit of keeping us entirely with the clones (so that we are as ill-informed as they are and never get to meet their powerful oppressors) only reveals what an empty-headed abstraction this tale was from both page and frame one
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Cage is not quite Aguirre or Fitzcarraldo in the Big Easy. But his performance hits all the right mythopoetic beats, rising above the thin script and late-night-cable aesthetic.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Tony Scott almost wins us over with this fun thrill ride.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This isn't the NASCAR-fellating cash grab that is the Cars franchise, but it's still Pixar on preachy autopilot.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The doc’s breakout star is Vogue creative director Grace Coddington, a former model whose plain appearance (the end result of a horrible car accident) and frumpy clothing belie her genius for fashion. She counters her boss every chance she can get and provides the film with a much-needed emotional center.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Anna Wintour? Feh! There never was, and never will be, a style icon quite like Diana Vreeland.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Puzzling and provocative, Alps has a lingering power and an effect that is thrillingly difficult to define.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What matters more is recognizing Post Tenebras Lux’s kinship with a strain of impressionistic autobiographical cinema practiced by filmmakers such as Andrei Tarkovsky (The Mirror) and Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life) in which every sound and image seems to spring straight from the psyche.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though it holds your attention all the way through to an enigmatic, spiritually tinged climax, the movie leaves you wanting more than the Vega Vidals' secondhand artistry is able to provide.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    First-time director Josh Trank, working from a taut script by Max "Son of John" Landis, indulges in some wild, witty spectacle, but he's equally adept with the tale's grimmer elements, especially when the introverted Andrew unleashes his inner Magneto and uses the city of Seattle as his tear-it-apart emotional playground.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It would be a Christmas miracle save for one lump of coal: an ear-shattering Justin Bieber song over the end credits. Gotta sell something to the kids at Yuletide.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film isn't blinded by Candy's beauty and celebrity; it digs critically, if still empathetically, beneath.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s still enough of merit here (particularly a movingly low-key finale that strikes just the right note of reconciliation and regret) to suggest that Porterfield has the chops to eventually hone his talents to a fine point.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The effort is commendable and the complicated emotions of the piece (for a place and a people) come through loud and clear. To paraphrase the great Ms. Russell, the movie has the power to make you laugh and the power to break your heart in half.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The longer this "Abbott and Costello's Lethal Weapon" goes on, the more the fun dissipates - until a queasily violent climax, which, naturally, fully embraces genre stereotypes rather than dismantling them.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's supremely annoying to see the ups and downs of romance reduced to archer-than-arch line readings and bloodless mortal kombat. What's more frustrating is that the film, adapted from Bryan Lee O'Malley's popular comic, is an endless visual delight.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's especially disappointing when the story takes an inevitable turn to starry-eyed mush, dulling the sharp satire of the crazy, stupid ins and outs of romantic entanglement with an unconvincingly saccharine one-true-love-for-all moral.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It almost becomes comical to count the number of "who's holding the camera now?" reverse shots that the filmmaker haphazardly inserts to propel the story forward. Such visual ineptitude, like much else in this tediously cocky enterprise, is downright criminal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The laughs are purely surface; the film's women's-lib pretensions seem grafted on as if to lend significance to a story that would benefit from a lighter, less cerebral touch. Still, it's hard to resist La Deneuve's charms.