For 607 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Margaret
Lowest review score: 20 Straw Dogs
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 607
607 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Fortunately Coppola’s sensitivity is always evident, especially in the open-hearted performances she gets from Roberts and Kilmer (whose father, Val, has a funny, pot-addled cameo).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Anna Wintour? Feh! There never was, and never will be, a style icon quite like Diana Vreeland.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The script—which Jones, Kieran Fitzgerald and Wesley Oliver adapted from Glendon Swarthout's 1988 novel—shifts uneasily between tragedy and comedy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Puzzling and provocative, Alps has a lingering power and an effect that is thrillingly difficult to define.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Like :Carnage,: it’s a bit of a minor lark until a deliciously grotesque finale pushes it into the realm of such kinkily profound Polanski films as: Cul-de-sac: (1966) and "The Tenant" (1976). By that point, you can’t help but submit to the perversity.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    What matters more is recognizing Post Tenebras Lux’s kinship with a strain of impressionistic autobiographical cinema practiced by filmmakers such as Andrei Tarkovsky (The Mirror) and Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life) in which every sound and image seems to spring straight from the psyche.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though it holds your attention all the way through to an enigmatic, spiritually tinged climax, the movie leaves you wanting more than the Vega Vidals' secondhand artistry is able to provide.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    First-time director Josh Trank, working from a taut script by Max "Son of John" Landis, indulges in some wild, witty spectacle, but he's equally adept with the tale's grimmer elements, especially when the introverted Andrew unleashes his inner Magneto and uses the city of Seattle as his tear-it-apart emotional playground.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    It would be a Christmas miracle save for one lump of coal: an ear-shattering Justin Bieber song over the end credits. Gotta sell something to the kids at Yuletide.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film isn't blinded by Candy's beauty and celebrity; it digs critically, if still empathetically, beneath.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s still enough of merit here (particularly a movingly low-key finale that strikes just the right note of reconciliation and regret) to suggest that Porterfield has the chops to eventually hone his talents to a fine point.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The effort is commendable and the complicated emotions of the piece (for a place and a people) come through loud and clear. To paraphrase the great Ms. Russell, the movie has the power to make you laugh and the power to break your heart in half.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The longer this "Abbott and Costello's Lethal Weapon" goes on, the more the fun dissipates - until a queasily violent climax, which, naturally, fully embraces genre stereotypes rather than dismantling them.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It's supremely annoying to see the ups and downs of romance reduced to archer-than-arch line readings and bloodless mortal kombat. What's more frustrating is that the film, adapted from Bryan Lee O'Malley's popular comic, is an endless visual delight.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    It's especially disappointing when the story takes an inevitable turn to starry-eyed mush, dulling the sharp satire of the crazy, stupid ins and outs of romantic entanglement with an unconvincingly saccharine one-true-love-for-all moral.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It almost becomes comical to count the number of "who's holding the camera now?" reverse shots that the filmmaker haphazardly inserts to propel the story forward. Such visual ineptitude, like much else in this tediously cocky enterprise, is downright criminal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The laughs are purely surface; the film's women's-lib pretensions seem grafted on as if to lend significance to a story that would benefit from a lighter, less cerebral touch. Still, it's hard to resist La Deneuve's charms.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This lifelong Tintin fan was more than pleased, even while having to acknowledge that the movie lacks the subtle state-of-the-world commentary that Hergé often smuggled into his creation.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Mostly though, it feels like we're watching a superficial gloss on Goodman's CV rather than a probing interrogation of his legacy. For the choir only.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The troubling turns the story takes, which are meant as a rebuke to happily-ever-after stereotypes, are much more interesting in conception than they are in execution.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The film suddenly gains in power, until it fulfills the promise of its title with hard-hitting compassion and a crystal-clear sense of grace.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    The sights are gorgeous—a seamless mix of archival imagery and impressively rendered digital views of our galaxy—and the science is, to layman’s eyes and ears, more than credible.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Imagine if Frederick Wiseman and David Lynch had a bastard child, and you'll get a sense of the movie's off-kilter aesthetic, a potent and pointed mix of firsthand observation and surreal flights of fancy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Photographed with an alluring sheen that complements the coldly commercial wheelings and dealings of its subjects, Red Obsession fascinatingly reveals how Old World vintner artistry is being shaken up by New World supply and demand.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The falsely euphoric close is a big misstep - Pulitzers, it would seem, are the ultimate Band-Aid. What was that old adage about printing the legend?
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s bleakness in the beauty: What begins as a personal coming-of-age story ends as a tragic tale of a community’s stunted adolescence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Darren Aronofsky’s big-ticket retelling of the biblical legend of Noah (Russell Crowe, so damn serious) is a wildly stupid, yet still train-wreck-fascinating piece of work.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The major change is that the domestic, Eun-yi (the great Jeon, star of "Secret Sunshine"), is now more of a victim than an aggressor.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Losier has made a quietly revolutionary work that treats a pair of people on the fringes with the decency all humans deserve.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Terrific performances and superb cinematography (by Claire Denis’s right hand, Agnès Godard) lift cowriter-director Ursula Meier’s feature debut above its thuddingly metaphorical premise.