For 564 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Blue Beard
Lowest review score: 20 Lone Survivor
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 42 out of 564
564 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Mouth’s dubious legacy and his many off-camera complications are examined with a coarse affection of which he himself would surely approve.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The movie feels like too much of a lark. To paraphrase the play’s voice of reason, Friar Francis, it would be better if Whedon paused awhile and let his counsel sway us more.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Loznitsa would have done better to embrace the story’s enigmas as opposed to explicate them.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    They (Bullock/McCarthy) deserve a much stronger showcase than this Laurel & Hardy Go Policin’ vehicle.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Carell and Wiig make a splendid vocal pair — Nick and Nora Charles with ice guns and lipstick Tasers.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    As subcultural anthropology, it’s unassailable. Yet the often ugly-looking DV aesthetic dilutes the cumulative effect.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Smash & Grab aims to replicate the mesmeric tension of a Michael Mann thriller (the crime-cinema impresario is even explicitly referenced by one of the cops assigned to hunt down the group), though the film is so all over the place stylistically that it often seems like several different movies cut together.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Viewers familiar with Daniels’s idiosyncratically vulgar work might be disappointed that there’s little here that compares to Nicole Kidman loosing a yellow stream on Zac Efron’s jellyfish stings in "The Paperboy" (2012).
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You can barely stifle a laugh, and the way Wright and Watts deliver rote, morally searching dialogue with deer-in-the-headlights stoicism (“We’ve crossed a line,” Lil blankly notes) doesn’t help matters.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    If anything distinguishes director Régis Roinsard’s take on well-trod material, it’s his Technicolor-bright widescreen palette (recalling many a late-’50s pillow-talk romance without a hint of snooty irony) and energetically game cast.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Photographed with an alluring sheen that complements the coldly commercial wheelings and dealings of its subjects, Red Obsession fascinatingly reveals how Old World vintner artistry is being shaken up by New World supply and demand.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Watching this see-in-the-dark muscleman brooding against gorgeous otherworldly vistas, all while crafting pointy homemade weapons and befriending a scene-stealing CGI canine (no joke), is a sci-fi aficionado's delight.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    You still leave impressed at the way Stanton fiercely protects the aura of mystery that makes him such an indelible onscreen presence.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The uniformly showy performances (Acting with a capital ‘A’) are what do in Prisoners more than anything.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    This is not a choice made lightly by anyone involved, but the admirable, multilayered toughness of these sequences is unfortunately weakened by the filmmakers’ saccharine touch whenever they explore the doctors’ personal lives.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s still enough of merit here (particularly a movingly low-key finale that strikes just the right note of reconciliation and regret) to suggest that Porterfield has the chops to eventually hone his talents to a fine point.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The scenes of the film’s exuberant, frizzy-haired protagonist wandering Naples and revisiting old haunts, however, seem much more unfocused—a ramshackle search for insights into the man’s art and life that rarely come. The instruments are in tune, but the rhythm is off.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    No new ground is broken, and viewers will, not unpleasantly, get everything they expect. It’s apparently morning in America again.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The overall effect is not unlike watching a chef de cuisine experimenting in his off-hours; not everything takes, but you still come away with a pleasingly stimulated palate.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Once Pip reaches the big city, Newell starts losing the dramatic focus, piling on incidents and revelations with a bombastic force that makes it seem as if we’re watching a cheap 19th-century telenovela.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Still, if any modern strip is worthy of an extended, Hobbes-style tongue bath, it’s this one.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    A Matrix Reloaded–like cliffhanger reminds that this is only the second installment out of four (good lord), but at least the flick leaves us with more than a tinge of interest in whom the odds will favor next.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Though Lemmons’s parable-like intentions are clear, almost every beat of Langston’s tale, with its absent father figures and heated gun-pointing melodrama, rings false — hardly a fitting contemporary complement to the Greatest Story Ever Told.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Once the undead start walking, however, the film loses some of its footing: Most of the bloodletting is staged with quick-cut inelegance better suited to the hack horror production of your choosing, though there’s still a potent air of hopelessness that lingers as the cast is winnowed away "Ten Little Indians"–style.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There are a few too many twists on this highway.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    What ran more than three hours onstage now barely cracks two, and the cutting can be felt in the way the often gut-busting bad behavior is privileged over psychological credibility.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    Quentin Tarantino showcased her bubbly personality (and ass-kicking dexterity) in 2007’s terrific gearhead horror movie, "Death Proof." Now, seasoned stuntwoman Zoë Bell gets a vehicle all her own—a disposable battle royal no-budgeter that’s immensely elevated by her presence.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The movie is never less than involving, but rarely amounts to more than a third-generation grindhouse knockoff.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The Aatsinki siblings never rise past a kind of rotely anonymous masculinity, and overall the film tends to lull rather than engage the senses.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    There’s bleakness in the beauty: What begins as a personal coming-of-age story ends as a tragic tale of a community’s stunted adolescence.