For 619 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Almayer's Folly
Lowest review score: 20 47 Ronin
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 619
619 movie reviews
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Whether blithely comparing American prisons to retirement homes or gleefully recalling the time he chewed off his own fingers in Siberia, the moonlighting German New Wave auteur injects some much-needed black humor into what is otherwise a soporific star vehicle.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It almost becomes comical to count the number of "who's holding the camera now?" reverse shots that the filmmaker haphazardly inserts to propel the story forward. Such visual ineptitude, like much else in this tediously cocky enterprise, is downright criminal.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It’s only when the sentient snacks are front and center that this middling sequel to the 2009 animated hit truly comes alive.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The satire rarely stings, as first-time feature directors Declan Donnellan and Nick Ormerod give a polite Masterpiece Theatre gloss to this most impolite of tales.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Gerwig is plenty charming, considering the rote stuff she has to work with. Yet this still feels like a real devolution - hopefully short-lived - after her distinctively eccentric turns in "Greenberg" and "Damsels in Distress."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The story — aside from a climax that plays like a too-knowing rebuke to Disney formula — goes tediously through the motions. It isn’t only Papa Walt’s head that’s been put on ice.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Darren Aronofsky’s big-ticket retelling of the biblical legend of Noah (Russell Crowe, so damn serious) is a wildly stupid, yet still train-wreck-fascinating piece of work.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It’s a hit-and-mostly-miss affair: For every gut-buster like McBride and Franco’s lengthy exchange about drenching each other in seminal fluid, there’s a fall-flat gag.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    By the time the film takes a glib turn into role-switching farce - as Muslims become Christians and Christians become Muslims - the overall toothlessness of the satire becomes damningly apparent.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Despite a committed performance from Palminteri (ripping through scenes like an aged bulldog), Debbie Goodstein's loosely autobiographical drama is as nondescript as made-for-pennies independents come.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This is a man-versus-nature parable heavy on the sappy existentialism that's very much of our time. Call it Nicholas Sparks's The Grey.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    For all of Cloud Atlas's pseudorevolutionary blather about upending the "natural order," the execution couldn't be squarer.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lynskey has raised the quality of innumerable feature films (as a soft-spoken New Republic reporter in Shattered Glass; a housewife on the verge of a nervous breakdown in Away We Go-that film's sole saving grace). So it's a delight to see this stalwart character actor move to center stage, even when the result is so by-the-numbers.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    This is little more than an expensive-looking celebrity vacation video—more evidence in support of the notion that the Hollywood house always wins.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    In a word: Ugh.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    2 Guns quickly degenerates into boilerplate Hollywood sound and fury, complete with a climactic Mexican standoff that revolves around a massive, burning pile of money. Irony, thou art lost.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Intrigue and eroticism abound, all of it watchable, none of it particularly exciting. And the misty widescreen photography lends the proceedings a funereal air of respectability that's like catnip to Oscar voters.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Lay the Favorite is frenzied without being funny. Like Judy Holliday on a particularly manic day, Hall tears from scene to scene with a bubbly effervescence that is technically impressive yet increasingly exhausting.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Yet worst of all is the way the film ultimately reveals its humanistic setup as a lazy pretext to redeem Damon's big-business apologist through the healing power of nature. He's not the only one who should be put out to pasture.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The curtain can't come down fast enough.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Too-cutesy conceits such as Hitch's imagined conversations with serial killer Ed Gein (Michael Wincott) feebly attempt to ground the story in psychological terra firma, while horribly on-the-nose dialogue flatters those viewers who prefer to keep their sense of cinema history on fan-mag frivolous levels.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Such a feature-length bludgeoning, even in the service of basic social and scientific literacy, is truly discomfiting.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The badly miscalculated meat of the film is an endless parade of to-camera addresses by performers such as Lindsay Lohan, Viola Davis and Uma Thurman, all reading clumsily from Monroe's recently discovered letters and journal entries as if it were final-exam time at the Actors Studio.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Weird for weirdness’s sake gets you only so far, however, and when Dupieux tries to connect all these strange goings-on to Dolph’s corporate-drone despondency, the movie takes a spurious turn toward rancid sentimentality. It seems that even a piece of dog excrement has feelings. Yuck.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The promise Dumont once showed has ossified into unholy shtick.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There’s a ruthlessly effective movie to be made from this material, and you couldn’t hope for a better performer than Shannon, who can turn on a dime between quiet malevolence and volcanic rage, to inhabit the sociopathic central figure. Unfortunately, this overproduced biopic constantly counteracts the actor’s committed efforts with its pale-imitation slickness.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Brühl, meanwhile, is saddled with the unenviable task of being this hollow movie’s slow-dawning voice of reason: His climactic conversation with newspaper editor David Thewlis (never worse) is one of the most embarrassingly didactic Way We Live Now™ summations ever filmed.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though the Tavianis’ intent is clear—to comment on the thin line separating part and performer, as well as on the quite literally liberating powers of art—the meanings rarely emerge with any elegance or resonance. Hardly a dish fit for the gods.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Even at its most affecting, Simon Killer rarely seems like more than a cinema-du-Gaspar-Noé simulacrum. The languorous long-takes, dissociative sound design and strobe-light scene transitions meant to mirror this emotional con artist’s skewed view of the world are anxiety-of-influence hand-me-downs through and through—viscera without vision.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The characters may soar, but viewers’ spirits stay grounded.

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