For 628 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Take Shelter
Lowest review score: 0 The Do-Over
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 51 out of 628
628 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The promise Dumont once showed has ossified into unholy shtick.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The true soulfulness of Sendak’s parable never emerges.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The unintentional hilarity of the whole enterprise - especially when Albert attempts to romance one of the hotel's naive employees (Wasikowska) - at least keeps you engaged, as does the scene-by-scene suspense over which pitiably wide-eyed expression Close will choose to use next. Hopefully, she's practicing her gracious-loser face for awards season.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It’s a hit-and-mostly-miss affair: For every gut-buster like McBride and Franco’s lengthy exchange about drenching each other in seminal fluid, there’s a fall-flat gag.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Writer-director Jane Campion approaches the tale with an artiste’s respectful solemnity, but it too often comes off like "Twilight" transplanted across oceans and centuries.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The characters may soar, but viewers’ spirits stay grounded.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    For all of Cloud Atlas's pseudorevolutionary blather about upending the "natural order," the execution couldn't be squarer.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The results make your head spin more than they make your spirits soar.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    If What to Expect represents the best tearjerking laugh-machine that Hollywood can birth, it's probably time to get those story ideas implanted in vitro.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    It almost becomes comical to count the number of "who's holding the camera now?" reverse shots that the filmmaker haphazardly inserts to propel the story forward. Such visual ineptitude, like much else in this tediously cocky enterprise, is downright criminal.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Leaving is a tawdry potboiler slathered riotously in portent, complete with a lamebrained detour into vengeance that only Claude Chabrol would be able to pull off.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Props should be given to Rodriguez’s breathless “let’s put on a show” inventiveness. Plus, Macy and the booger--kick ass!
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As with many young-adult book-to-film series, Beautiful Creatures plays like an illustrated compendium of scenes from the novel, as opposed to a finely tuned narrative all its own.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    There’s nothing more boring than a life embalmed with halfhearted Hollywood bombast, which only makes the film’s fleeting pleasures stand out all the more.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Sadly, most of the film's dull edges have to do with De Niro, who is clearly in rest-on-his-laurels mode; at his worst, he approaches radioactive, Robin Williams levels of bathos, as when Jonathan - roaring like a bush-league Lear - is banned from the shelter for bad behavior.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Charlie Victor Romeo would probably work best as a training tool for commercial airline pilots (the play, interestingly, has already been used in this fashion by the Pentagon). In a movie theater for a paying crowd, it’s little more than minimalist snuff.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Several quick-witted touches-such as a hilarious nod to Depp's role in "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas"-can't make up for Gore Verbinski's leaden direction of this digitally animated feature.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The movie amounts to little more than Marky Mark's South American Vacation.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    For a few brief moments, the film becomes something close to Greek mythology, as opposed to graphic-novel imitator. What a feeling!
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    In a word: Ugh.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As in the first film, the seasoned-pro cast provides the few fleeting pleasures to be found.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    An hour and half of comparable barbarity follows-all of it monotonous, none of it enlightening.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The film is made up of plundered parts from the "Oceans" series and "The Usual Suspects," and—like several of the forged tomes that figure in the plot — it’s a pale imitation.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Who would have thought that the man behind such wackadoo fantasies as "The Professional" and "The Fifth Element" was capable of being so bloody boring?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Don’t look to this skin-deep biopic to offer any insights beyond the head-slappingly superficial.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Only Jones seems most at home, striking just the right note of low-key malevolence. You’d follow him anywhere — maybe even into a better movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    As with many a first feature, Gordon-Levitt’s so-so directorial debut is pumped up with ambition. The early scenes, heavy on caricature, promise to puncture much of the cocky illusions surrounding modern relationships.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Though the Tavianis’ intent is clear—to comment on the thin line separating part and performer, as well as on the quite literally liberating powers of art—the meanings rarely emerge with any elegance or resonance. Hardly a dish fit for the gods.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The main talking point of this empty-headed thriller from Mexican director Amat Escalante is a sure-to-be-notorious instance of penis incineration — a dubious distinction.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    Despite the chronological juggling, the film's stylistic debts (a Hitchcock flashback borrowed from Stage Fright, a Bertolucci-esque apartment sequence that could be titled Last Tango in Auschwitz) are simplistic to a fault; they lack the multifaceted suspense and sensuality typified by those directors at their best.

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