For 1,706 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ken Fox's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Half Nelson
Lowest review score: 0 Strange Wilderness
Score distribution:
1,706 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    An uncanny and thoroughly creepy nip-yuck nightmare about plastic surgery and identity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Unexpectedly poignant documentary.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Teenage angst and adolescent agony are the stuff of sharp, observant comedy this quirky, wonderfully dry first fiction feature from documentary filmmaker Jeffrey Blitz (Spellbound).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The one film to see on this most crucial subject.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The nerve-racking wait at the Contention hotel is no longer the film's centerpiece, but the deeper characterization gives Bale an opportunity to once again sink his teeth into a complex role, and offers a reminder as to why the notoriously difficult Crowe is sometimes worth the trouble.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Wood is excellent, but this is a career highlight for Douglas. His depiction of the manic Charlie stays surprisingly grounded and prevents the story from being a naive celebration of mental illness as a kind of freedom that it so easily could have become.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    This gripping documentary sheds light on the frightening totality of Hitler's vision for a Germanic Europe, and the extent to which he and his Nazi thugs were no better than common thieves.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Zombie delivers a scary horror movie immediately recognizable as his own -- something that will come as a welcome relief to fans who've diligently sat through seven "Halloween" sequels in hopes of one day reliving the original's terrifying magic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    It's a bit like a Chinese "Splendor In The Grass."
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Does find a spot closer to the middle than most.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Through the hard-won experiences of these families, Karslake shows that Scripture and homosexuality are not mutually exclusive, and with the help of a number of academics and theologians, shows how the Bible has been misread, particularly during the 20th century.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Filmmaker AJ Schnack's hauntingly beautiful film is a bold and successful attempt to recover the human being who disappeared under the heavy mantle of "face and voice of a lost generation," and whose life has been increasingly overshadowed by his sensational early death in 1994.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Taut, powerfully acted political thriller.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Allen Loeb's first produced screenplay is an unvarnished treatment of death and its aftermath that's unusual for a Hollywood film.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The true star of this nerve-racking family crime drama, shot with a minimum of fuss by Ron Fortunato, is playwright and first-time screenwriter Kelly Masterson's deft script, which carefully develops each fatally flawed character and tells their stories in achronological flashbacks that seamlessly fit together like a jigsaw puzzle.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Schroeder's film is a fascinating character study in contradictions and in the end Verges remains loathsome, oddly charismatic and willfully enigmatic.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    More than any previous film on the subject, Braun's documentary offers an answer to a common question, perfectly phrased and answered by Cheadle himself: "What can I do? More than nothing. A lot more than nothing."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Fast paced and engagingly acted.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    This melancholy mediation on aging and desire hangs on an exquisite performance from Penelope Cruz.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    What Guttentag and Sturman gain in dramatic immediacy, however, they lose when it comes to historical context, and the chance to offer insight into why such things occur in the first place -- and continue to happen today -- is lost.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    What one interviewee calls a "fog of ambiguity" surrounding what was and wasn't officially authorized shielded superior officers and key members of the Department of Defense -- namely Donald Rumsfeld.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    A brisk dramatic comedy that combines melodrama, humor and social critique in equal measure.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    A remote, Israeli desert town is the setting for this droll, endearing comedy about an accidental cultural exchange that very quietly says some very important things about contemporary Arab-Israeli relations.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Techine's unwillingness to soften his characters reflects a rare honesty about human nature that's rarely seen in movies, particularly movies about fatal illnesses, and his film is an engaging and particularly French character study.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Twenty years ago, Li's film might have served as a warning; today, it rues a dehumanizing economic system run rampant that leaves one sad slave wife to muse, "It's easy to die. It's living that's hard."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Raises important questions that resonate far beyond the subject at hand: What is the meaning of accomplishment, and how do you define triumph?
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    It's an unexpectedly powerful little film that manages to say a lot of what, despite all the talk on the subject, isn't being said in the national debate on immigration.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    Never the most optimistic of poets, Sokurov does suggest the possibility of dialogue on the individual level, and the hope that by asking difficult questions of one another, these mortal enemies can find answers and reach an understanding everyone can live with.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    There's a hilarious performance of a "de-fascisized" version of Beethoven's "Ode to Joy," and the soundtrack prominently features an Italian version of the crypto-fascist girl-group classic "I Will Follow Him," a joke Kenneth Anger first made in "Scorpio Rising" that's still funny today.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Ken Fox
    The lovely Audrey Tautou and sad-eyed Gad Elmaleh are perfectly cast as a gold digger and the poor sap who loves her, but the real star of Pierre Salvadori's larky, Lubitsch-esque farce is France's impossibly chic Cote d'Azure.