For 504 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 28% same as the average critic
  • 19% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ken Tucker's Scores

Average review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Girls: Season 1
Lowest review score: 16 Duckman: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 20 out of 504
504 tv reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    No show this side of Seinfeld loves the language of conversation (the wisecrack, the pun, the withering retort, and the muttered aside) as much. ... Week in and week out, Buffy just slays me.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    A series with as much emotional punch as The Sopranos.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    A sparky new season.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    There are many ways in which Ed, the best new show of the season, could have been perfectly awful.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    Roseanne remains endlessly watchable: startling, funny, and complicated.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    Well into its third season, X-Files shows no sign of flagging inspiration; its ability to find paranoia in the paranormal appears to be limitless.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    The X-Files is hitting the ground running—albeit knee-deep in murk and murder, conspiracy and cosmic confluences.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    One of the best things about the second season of Frasier is the way the series has come to mix its high and low humor.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    This series has become as dependably amusing as any show on television.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    It has the best tough-guy dialogue around and an acting ensemble that's ferociously effective. Face it: Homicide is a killer.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    Homicide seems to have found just the right balance: Almost every week, it is as well acted and tough-minded as it ever was, while also offering the sort of snappy stories that can grab any viewer looking for merciful relief from the mannered eccentricity of that icky Picket Fences.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    The terrific thing about the new season, starting with the introduction of Weaver [Laura Innes], is that personalities on ER have become as complicated and messy as brain surgery.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    Quite aside from the fact that, snicker for snicker, belly laugh for belly laugh, it's probably the funniest show on television, Seinfeld is also one of the purest of all TV-viewing pleasures. This sitcom ... is blissfully free of creaky plots, trumped-up romances, and wise-mouthed kids. ... You get the feeling these days that Seinfeld, [Larry] David, and frequent director Tom Cherones are striving for a show in which the laughs flow with unceasing ease. Each week, they get a little closer; be there when it happens.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    Seinfeld is now a revitalized show, snappy and gratifyingly complicated once more.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    It's becoming obvious that The Simpsons, now in its second season, isn't just a product of media hype: Matt Groening's cartoon family is one of the few current works of popular art that possess wit and integrity.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    The Simpsons has never been better. At a time when half-hour TV comedy is reaching a new level of self-referential daring — you can't fully appreciate the intricate, in-joke pleasures of great shows like NBC's Seinfeld and HBO's The Larry Sanders Show unless you've also watched a lot of really bad TV — The Simpsons continues to emphasize that there's a big world out there that television barely touches upon.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    This is one of the sharpest, most purely pleasurable television series ever. ... What began in 1987 (as animated filler between sketches on The Tracey Ullman Show) has become one of the medium's most dependable entertainments, a cartoon that transcended cartoonishness a long time ago.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    thirtysomething has always been agreeably open-ended, full of rambling, shaggy-yuppie stories that never conclude decisively. That's what drives some viewers up the wall, and entrances others.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    The Larry Sanders Show is all tension, cynicism, profound shallowness, and naughty-boy bonding — it's just the way you imagine life behind a big-time TV talk show to be, except infinitely funnier.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    After you watch a Larry Sanders show, the rest of television seems like it's on Prozac — smooth and edgeless, where Sanders is prickly and nervous.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    If you think Garry Shandling must be running out of ways to deconstruct show business, you're wrong. This will probably prove the most fearless half hour of comedy all year.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    Larry Sanders has always contained an undercurrent of tragedy in its portrait of a pathetically insecure man whose work is his life, and whose life is one long, uncomfortable commercial break. Fearlessly, Shandling and his cowriters are pushing Larry to the edge.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    In the last third of the season, NYPD Blue was as good as it's ever been: more action to go with the already terrific dialogue; more unexpected twists from a show that could have easily let up on its twisting in its second season. ... If you tuned away from NYPD when [David] Caruso left, now's the time to catch up.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    Right now, the show is probably as good as it's ever been.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    A terrific blastoff. ... Groening, deeply influenced by the paranoid fantasies of writer Philip K. Dick, the dystopian surrealism of the Firesign Theatre, and every cornball sci-fi movie, creates an airy atmosphere ripe for satirizing our love of computer technology.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    This season, the show's only gotten better — deeper, richer, more true to its guiding intention of presenting people with Texas twangs as something other than the media cliche of rubes with bad taste.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    The series is full of surprises ... And as Tony, Gandolfini gives a magnificently shrewd, wary performance. If, like me, you thought you never wanted to watch another Mob story, be sure to check this out.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    Miraculous ... One of the myriad greatnesses of The Sopranos is that, to paraphrase the Godfather paraphrase that Steven Van Zandt's Silvio frequently quotes, it keeps pulling you back in — back in on yourself, appealing to your basest instincts, to your fundamental urge to hear a bloody story well told.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    The new Sopranos is as good as it's ever been -- ruthlessly emotional, cuttingly funny and frightening.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    This may be the first TV show since Pee-wee's Playhouse to treasure youth even as it embodies all of its contradictions, craziness, hopes, and fears (and I'd like to point out that Freaks is the only hour-long sitcom I've ever seen that sustains funniness for its full 60 minutes).