For 507 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 27% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ken Tucker's Scores

Average review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 The Ben Stiller Show: Season 1
Lowest review score: 16 Weird Science: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 21 out of 507
507 tv reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Ken Tucker
    Kelley has made Janey Patterson, as played by Mary-Louise Parker, into a romantic interest for Hodges. This fix is not only needless--that’s one reason Taylor’s Ida exists, as she did in King’s novel: to provide Hodges with some intimate comfort--but it seems both less believable. ... Putting that aside, Mr. Mercedes is awfully good.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Ken Tucker
    Julie and Billy are enthusiastically mean, sarcastic, and lovable--all at once.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Ken Tucker
    As it is, writer-showrunner David Hollander has certainly crafted, last season and this one, an absorbing melodrama, aided a great deal by directors including John Dahl, who does terrific work in the second and third episodes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    Is the show funny? Sort of. It’s certainly charming, in a frequently vulgar sort of way, and well performed by the cast and guest stars.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Ken Tucker
    The Sinner is at once intriguing and frustrating.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    Showrunner-director Greg Yaitanes (Banshee, Quarry) does a frequently fine job of shooting these evidence-gathering sessions with lots of intensity and suspense--this despite the fact that Worthington isn’t really that compelling as Fitz.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Ken Tucker
    Room 104 is extremely uneven.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Ken Tucker
    Diana, Our Mother is a very touching and forthright hour spent with the sons and other people who knew Diana.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Ken Tucker
    The show has an occasionally suspenseful twist. (Electrocution in the water: Watch out!) But as it proceeds, Ozark takes way too long to make a few good points and to showcase a few good performances, most prominently Jason Bateman’s.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ken Tucker
    Issa Rae’s very funny, great-looking HBO sitcom Insecure is back for a second season on Sunday night, and it’s even better--more assured and finely detailed--than its excellent first season.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    The show’s regular flashbacks to the Nailer’s time in Afghanistan slow the pace and seem rather war-movie generic. The show is much better when we’re in contemporary times, such as the season premiere’s deftly choreographed shootout in a Frankfurt, Germany, ballroom.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    Loaded succeeds as a likable show, even if it’s one that takes a bit too much self-congratulatory pride in having the boys fail.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Ken Tucker
    The season premiere had a lot of table-setting storytelling--at once self-recapping the saga and pointing it toward its future--but it did so with a satisfying forthrightness.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Ken Tucker
    All the stars are as likable and watchable as you might think they’d be, yet the show that they’re in is nearly bereft of humor or poignance. It’s as though everyone signed on without reading a script and, good sports all, just forged ahead anyway.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 20 Ken Tucker
    In truth, the bi-ped hamsters of Big Brother offer a more realistic view of humanity than this unbelievable new disaster-drama series.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Ken Tucker
    For all its frenetic pacing, Will seems wheezily old-fashioned, the umpteenth attempt to attract a young audience to great art by modernizing it--except that Will’s ideas of modernity are a half-century old.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Ken Tucker
    The Defiant Ones works on almost every level: as a primer on the music industry, as gossip, as biography, as a time capsule of the 1980s, the 1990s, and the beginning of the 21st century. Neither Iovine nor Dre is particularly eloquent about their own achievements, but The Defiant Ones does that work for them, excitingly.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    There are times when Snowfall tries too hard for poignant irony, such as setting the scene of a vicious beat-down endured by young Franklin to the breezy beauty of Bill Withers’s song “Lovely Day.” But if you’re in the mood for a dark but sunny, meticulously detailed TV-show-as-novel narrative, Snowfall may draw you in.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Ken Tucker
    The first episode of Gypsy is a tough slog, what with a dallying pace and Jean making silly voice-over pronouncements . ... Allow yourself to be taken in by Watts’s wily strategy, and Gypsy may, at its best, be viewed as an interesting character study.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Ken Tucker
    Its refusal to reduce any of the crimes it portrayed to standard TV gestures, as well as the vividness of its two lead characters, give it an afterlife: I’d guess that many people will watch the series over again, even knowing how it turns out, just to spend time in the bleak town of Broadchurch.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Ken Tucker
    For the most part, this is the Playing House you’ve either come to love or ought to be catching up with as soon as possible.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    The new Gong Show, even with the unfunny Tommy Maitland, is a bit more fun than those other attempts [such as The Match Game and To Tell The Truth] at revival.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    The GLOW team--that are walking clichés who gradually become somewhat filled-in creations. The weakest parts of GLOW occur when the action stops to trace the backstory of this fighter or that one--in other words, when GLOW is most like OITNB. It’s best when the show is exploring the complex friendship between Ruth and Debbie, or whenever anyone is bouncing off of Maron’s director Sam Sylvia.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    A solid reimagining of the Stephen King novella of the same name, The Mist is an intriguing new example of scary TV.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Ken Tucker
    I found the crimes too similar to a dozen recent TV whodunits, and Campbell’s solemn croak an irritating affectation.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Ken Tucker
    The whole party-scene setting, complete with sneering guys with chains and women in brightly-colored wigs, is apparently intended to make you gawp at its carnal adventurousness. Instead, like the rest of Blood Drive, it’s as painfully boring as watching someone hit his fingers repeatedly with a hammer in an attempt to shock you.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Ken Tucker
    The conversations are conducted via a Russian translator, and you have to be in the mood to read a lot of subtitles to engage with Putin and Stone’s policy discussions, but that small effort is well worth it. There are light moments here and there.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Ken Tucker
    I liked Claws’s sun-baked Florida setting, and the way the cameras capture the difference between the inside warmth of the nail salon versus the harsh ugliness of store-front life outside. And Nash is really excellent, rendering Desna in all her tough, vulnerable, shrewd complexity. The writing of the show needs to become as complex as that character.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Ken Tucker
    Kelly, making her debut as an NBC host, marshaled her trademark steeliness, but it was no match for the insults (“Do you even understand what you’re asking?”) and the weaselly tactics of the KGB master spy. ... The fact that Sunday Night spent as much time rolling in the African mud with elephants (in a report about elephant poaching) as it did with Putin suggests how slim the pickings were in the editing room. Kelly filled up the rest of her debut by turning it over to other correspondents.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Ken Tucker
    As drama, the show is inert. After watching four episodes, I realized I’d been watching constant variations of the same narrative arc: Comedian campaigns to get stage time at Goldie’s. Pause for subplots about other comics’ personal lives. Back to Goldie’s for a performance, during which the comedian either “kills” or bombs, after which he or she is just as miserable as when the episode began.

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