For 23 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kenji Fujishima's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 88 Himizu
Lowest review score: 25 47 Ronin
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 23
  2. Negative: 7 out of 23
23 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Kenji Fujishima
    Sion Sono's film is a vision of coming of age as trial by fire, a thunderous encapsulation of that period of transition in which adolescents try to discover themselves: their passions, their purpose, their sense of morality.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    A coming-of-age journey of self-realization, made immensely more involving by virtue of being seen through its subject's first-person perspective.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Stephen Chow's distinctive vision is evident in the seemingly boundless imagination of his scenarios, and in the film's sincere spiritual concerns and generosity toward misfits and outsiders.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    To some extent, the use of a wide aspect ratio and the doc's emphatic score takes its cues from paleontologist Pete Larson's passion.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    It constantly divides itself between fulfilling the conventions of the informational talking-heads documentary and aiming for a more poetically impressionistic quality.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    Chiemi Karasawa's documentary is remarkable for its candor, but it's a brutal honesty that Elaine Stritch herself gladly offers.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    With its broad performances, rapid-fire pacing, and rampant visual and verbal gags, Bernard Tavernier's first out-and-out comedy doesn't try too hard to hide its graphic-novel origins.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Kenji Fujishima
    By keeping explanatory talking-heads interviews to a minimum, the filmmakers put their trust in the audience to draw their own conclusions based on what they present to us.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Kenji Fujishima
    The film can't entirely avoid the feeling of a less-productive score-settling hit piece, as if Alex Gibney was making this film merely to stick it to the subject that screwed him big time.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Kenji Fujishima
    For all the heartbreaking depth with which the filmmakers explore the horrors of human trafficking, the film still leaves one with a sense of a larger story just beyond their grasp.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Kenji Fujishima
    The familiar premise is done with enough intelligence and heartfelt conviction that it rises above its potentially cliché trappings.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Kenji Fujishima
    Not even Bernardo Bertolucci's choice of a lead actor with visible facial acne scars, in a welcome gesture toward authenticity, is enough to overcome the gaping hole of psychological nuance at the center of the film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kenji Fujishima
    Mark Mori goes a bit overboard in hammering home his appreciation of Bettie Page's significance, allowing the film to occasionally lapse into repetitiveness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Kenji Fujishima
    Adds up little more than an anguished man using the hook of following his famous brother in order to gaze, however critically, at his reflection for 75 minutes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kenji Fujishima
    As informative, revealing, and occasionally poignant as some of the unearthed revelations are, the doc is ultimately hampered by a level of self-congratulation that nearly undoes its effectiveness as an activist polemic.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Kenji Fujishima
    An immensely gifted physical performer, Donnie Yen isn't strong enough an actor to suggest an authentic inner life to his character beyond a vague sense of stone-faced dissatisfaction.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Kenji Fujishima
    Given its virtuous subject matter and the relative bloodlessness of its violence, perhaps Renny Harlin means for this film to be a means of atoning for his previous cinematic sins.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Kenji Fujishima
    Putting aside the generic human interest, the film turns out to be shockingly deficient in its on-screen depiction of flexing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Kenji Fujishima
    Less explored in all the ensuing back-patting is the question of whether Cameron is, in fact, sincerely interested in learning more about the world around him or whether this mission is merely intended to stroke his own ego.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Kenji Fujishima
    Sean Ellis doesn't so much understand Filipino society as merely sees it as grist for standard genre fare, perhaps hoping that the foreign setting will somehow automatically make the clichés feel fresh.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 25 Kenji Fujishima
    This botched vision accepts the warrior's nobility at face value and sees the story merely as a springboard for high-flying action and CGI special effects.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 Kenji Fujishima
    The question of why one should actually work up any emotional investment in what happens to these people is never really answered, much less asked in the first place.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 25 Kenji Fujishima
    A glorified act of hero worship that leaves one hard-pressed to form any conclusion other than an infinitely positive one about Shep Gordon.