Kimberley Jones

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For 804 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 All the Real Girls
Lowest review score: 0 When in Rome
Score distribution:
804 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    A riot of sight and sound that, however baffling, has an irresistible, elemental pull.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a movie made of moments, the antithesis of "plot-driven," but the sum of these moments is magnificent, the culmination of so many elements: acting, scripting, score (by locals Michael Linnen and David Wingo), and cinematography.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    It’s almost criminal to have to stay in your seat when the contact high of La La Land is goosing you to grand jeté in the aisle. The heart, at least, is at liberty to swell to bursting.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    The film gets its biggest laughs – and there truly are some grandly bleak belly-shakers here – by upsetting the apple cart on traditional gender roles.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    The Grand Budapest Hotel is nothing short of an enchantment.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    It's huge and bewildering and it hurts to watch, but it hurts so good it's gorgeous.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    The film is so soaring, sometimes literally, I hardly missed the feeling of hard ground underfoot.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    Do we ever get the whole truth? Only this: The past is never the past. In Farhadi’s wounding worldview, the past is the present and, most certainly, the future, too.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    “Subtle” is the watchword for this kind of arthouse film. That can be a backhanded compliment, a buyer-beware to attention-deficit audiences, but Haigh is really quite plain with his preoccupations: the constant tick-tock of time, and the illusion that in marriage two are melded into one.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and touching, Frances Ha may very well be the most eloquent take yet on a generation in flux – a cinematic talk-back to so many Atlantic articles, minus the scolding and the statistics, and uncharacteristically (for Baumbach) uncynical.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s not quite as brutalizing as McEwan’s brilliant source novel – it bears too much of a Great Art buff – but it ravishes nonetheless in its grand exploration of the sins of the daughter and a lifetime spent making reparations.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A Most Violent Year is its own thing, hypnotic and exacting and as subtly savage as mellow-voiced Marvin Gaye’s “Inner City Blues (Makes Me Wanna Holler),” which opens the film and sets the tone. I was fully in thrall to it all.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's a mistake to confuse Zero Dark Thirty for "truth" – that would be a disservice to the high level of craftsmanship, from first-billed actors to below-the-line production crew, at work in this movie fiction – but there is admirably little fat on its bones.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This modest French-language film follows the time-honored cinematic tradition of plot as spearheaded by a simple twist of fate.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Bahrani's small marvel of a film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A rare achievement.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This is a quest movie, with a lot of ground covered, and just as our heroes never stay long in one place or feel safe in their surroundings, neither does the audience.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    God Help the Girl is not so perfectly crafted, but the promise – oh, the promise is irresistible.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In the House, from the eclectic French filmmaker François Ozon (Under the Sand, 8 Women), is an almost perverse delight, an egghead thriller that slyly shell-games its truer purpose as an inquiry into the construction – and deconstruction – of fiction. Scratch deconstruction: Make that tear-the-house-down demolition.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Smart, uncanny, resistant to the short cuts of pop psychology, and shocking in the best since of the word, Steers' debut is a stunner.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Looper makes a full-meal entertainment out of piecemealing genres: It boasts the kicky mental gymnastics that come with time-travel terrain, the relentless rapid heart rate of a crackerjack thriller, and the bursts of extreme violence, buttressed with black humor, of a modern actioner.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Screamingly funny. Like I said, terrific stuff.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The actors, as a powerful and convincing ensemble, are equally understated and just as devastating.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Cue the footage of Cockettes in spangles and glitter, high-kicking and belting out show tunes at the top of their lungs. Damn, it looks grand.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This drama-horror hybrid, set within a New York ballet company, strikes a tone more along the lines of the terrifying hallucinatories of Aronofsky's breakout film, "Requiem for a Dream," revisiting, too, favorite themes of monster mommies and female hysteria.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Anderson and his co-writer Roman Coppola have crafted an elegant and emphatic metaphor for adolescence, that tumultuous province of firsts and lasts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Vuillards, however fractured, know one another's rhythms and rituals, and Desplechin knows just how to convey them in the subtlest of ways.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The tension is enough to make you slightly sick, and the overall mood of the thing is deeply dispiriting, but then, nobody ever said that war isn't hell.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Kazan appears in every scene of The Exploding Girl’s perfectly paced 80 minutes, and you’d miss her if she ducked out for even a moment.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Nothing short of majestic.

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