Kimberley Jones
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For 671 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Past
Lowest review score: 0 The Virginity Hit
Score distribution:
671 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    White couldn't stay away, and neither can the band's legions of fans, who bop up and down in sold-out arenas at the reunion tour that provides the film's hopeful coda.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    (It should also be noted that Page One wears its pro-Times bias on its sleeve, right up to the rankling but now-common inclusion of a "get involved" Web address at film's end.)
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There's no question that the actors and filmmakers have fashioned a compelling (if unformed) love story of a certain age – which is not to be confused for a love story for the ages.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Snyder has cast Man of Steel with dramatic actors, not action stars, and it pays off.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect it's that spirit as much as the injustice of her incarceration that drew so many people to her cause and inspired this labor-of-love documentary about her journey to hell and back.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    After the recent rash of superhero end-spectacles as long-winded and self-serious as a term paper, the limited ambition of The Dark World’s climax is a relief. It scuttles all term paper aspirations and instead humbly lobs a thesis statement-slash-open invitation: Let’s have some fun, shall we? And so we did.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The script is chockablock with al dente amusements – obvious targets still make for wickedly funny one-liners – and the German actor Waltz (Inglourious Basterds) is terrific as the only parent unburdened by decorum.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Does Apatow understand his heroes are assholes?
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    As a portrait of what happens to a family when its glue disappears, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close wrung a bucket of tears out of me.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Hunger Games franchise, both in print and onscreen, has been exceptionally clever about cozying away imaginative space for fans to fill in the blanks and cast themselves in the rich drama. That this latest film leaves us hungering for more only means that it’s working.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Way never arrives anywhere you couldn't see coming a mile away, but it does so with such empathy that its conclusions feel comforting rather than overly predictable.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Echotone is scattered, for sure (the sound ordinance battle is poorly handled), but as an anecdotal account of Austin in the first decade of a new century, it's rarely anything less than compelling.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    In a media landscape that only has eyes for the sex lives of nubile young things, Hope Springs' sincere, considered, and unembarrassed exploration of mature sexuality marks a welcome exception.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    After a sparky first half greatly aided by Kristin Scott Thomas' devilish turn as an unsentimental press secretary, Salmon Fishing grows soggier. It's such a pretty, witty gloss of a picture, it hardly knows what to do with real-world terror, hence the Snidely Whiplash-like limning of Muslim extremists.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    She knew what "it" was going to be before anyone else. Or maybe she invented "it," and the magazine-buying public simply did as they were told.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's a wealth of material at odds with a scant running time and shallow focus.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    While Man on a Mission doesn't precisely neuter Garriott's weirder ways, it does push them aside for a more boilerplate message of the father/son bond.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The all-around excellent cast swings with aplomb from silly to sweet.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    While its heart is always in the right place, the humor – especially in the sludgy first act – is hit or miss.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Comedic actor François Damiens mines but never mocks Markus' awkwardness, thereby creating a winning portrait in decency. His tracing, with the ever-luminous Tautou, of the slow bloom of new love is a thing of understated beauty.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Sleepwalk With Me is never anything less than awfully likable. But I so wanted it to be more.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All told, Pitch Perfect isn't all that good – but it's an awfully good sport.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Queen of Versailles encourages the very worst tendencies in the audience: to sneer at the Siegels, to marvel at their tackiness, to root for their fall from grace.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    More often than not The Heat is just stupid-funny, which circles us back to McCarthy, motor-mouthing four-letter fury like an operatic aria. She sells Mullins as delightfully unhinged and fairly radiating with rage, and it’s irresistible.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Capitalizes on the audience’s familiarity with the many players and their complex backstories, but never advances the ball down the field, tenders no new thought or wrinkle to the franchise. It’s the difference between a diverting entertainment, and a riveting one.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    His (Spielberg) is an old-fashioned style of moviemaking that can produce soaring entertainment or, alternately, a fussed-over theatricality. Minute to minute, Lincoln moves between these extremes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Rush, a film about two real-life titans of Formula One racing in the Seventies, splits its narrative between these oil-and-water personalities, which feels about right: It's only half of a good movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It is certainly competent, lovely to look at, but leaves little lasting impression.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The former mayor is an alert onscreen presence, but the film surrounding him is not always so lively.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There isn’t a false step from the quietly devastating Farahani; her tour-de-force performance carries the film through its rocky stretches.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Blue Is the Warmest Color has its wobbles, but Exarchopoulos will knock you sideways.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Somm doesn’t try to write the book on wine connoisseurship, but it does give good CliffsNotes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The issue of late-term abortions tends to inspire polemics from both sides of the debate; Shane and Wilson’s approach – sensitive, measured, workmanlike – is a welcome one.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The material is interesting, and the production values are top-notch. Anushia Nieradzik deserves special notice for her costume design; her luxurious dresses in deep shades of purple and magenta race the pulse more than anything particular in the plot or characterization. It’s all quite well done, if only a touch too decorous.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Screenwriters Andy Paterson and Frank Cottrell Boyce (who wrote many of Michael Winterbottom’s early films) adeptly shift the action back and forth between these two timelines, and the drama – exterior and interior – is engrossing in both tracks.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Director Roger Michell and his frequent writer Hanif Kureishi (their last film together was Venus) regularly dance to the very cliff’s edge of despair, and only for the grace of good casting do you not wish they’d just jump and get it over with.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Marshmallow nation, you may now exhale: Rob Thomas did ya right.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Teenage is an art film – an engrossing one at that – so it isn’t required to respect Queensberry rules vis-à-vis documentaries.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Hundred-Foot Journey is elevated comfort food. The flavors aren’t complex, but it’s nourishing nonetheless.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Brothers is too depthless to dredge up any tears.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    “Caution: Contents may induce brain bleed.” That is, if you think too hard on the logic and mechanics of its time-travel conceit.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A romantic comedy, too, but this time the romance is between two women, and one of them, truth be told, is a dud.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This latest offering continues a trend toward increasingly mature moviemaking from the actor/writer/director.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Fletcher demonstrates, as with her second film, "27 Dresses," that she can put together a funny, able romantic comedy that is a cut above, but no more. Still, those leads are awfully likable, the Massachusetts-for-Alaska landscape rather picturesque, and if The Proposal doesn't reinvent the wheel, merrily we roll along nonetheless.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Gilroy zings the film with tantalizing bits of absurdity (one wonders, wistfully, what the Coen brothers would have done with this material), but too often he returns to his darker, more ponderous instincts.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Anyone who watched (and probably wept his or her way through) the swoony 2004 melodrama "The Notebook" knows Cassavetes is not a man to leave a spot of sap untapped, and in My Sister's Keeper, he pulls out a very big drill indeed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Sugar is a curiosity – too somber for a picaresque, too arm's-length for much emotional effect – and while it's interesting, it's never truly absorbing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The movie can be funny in fits, but too often the scripters go for the obvious and uninspired.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Uneven, ineffective mash-up of sex comedy and artillery-heavy action.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Terrio's technically proficient film is mature, modern, and minus the all-important passion and risk.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's unclear if Van Sant intends to inspire guilt; here, as elsewhere, he is exasperatingly abstruse. And in this striving to not say too much, he ends up not saying much of anything at all.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's a Big Idea movie that comes out only half-baked.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film never recovers its initial fizzy-pop charms, owing largely to pacing that turns positively molasses-slow in the second act.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Never thrills on an emotional level the way the best of sports films – a "Hoosiers," say – can, but it's a satisfying entertainment nonetheless.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This Native American romantic comedy, which won the Audience Award at the 2001 Austin Film Festival, arrives in theatres four years late but seasonally right on time.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Well, we're not in "Chicago" anymore, or even its soundstage approximation, but that hasn't stopped Oscar-nominated director Rob Marshall from fashioning another epic spectacle out of two squabbling women in (a sort-of) show business.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Glory Road really isn't a bad show – it's just an obvious one – and one wishes material of this historical import had received a more refined rendering.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Two Eighties genre staples – Disease-of-the-Week and Poppin' the Cherry – meet, shake hands, and mostly play nice in this sweet, if overly earnest feature.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The jokes hit about half the time – the best bits have an off-the-cuff feel – and it’s pocked with the kind of rom-com clichés that are practically written in stone (screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna's script for "The Devil Wears Prada" was far sharper).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There’s a surprising – and truthful – melancholic undercurrent to Definitely, Maybe – the one commonality between the three women is the heartbreak they induce – but Brooks undermines that truthfulness with a dogmatic insistence upon romantic mythologizing. No maybes about it: The reality is far darker, and more interesting.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Gondry’s well-meaning but too soft, too structure-less picture.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There are momentary pleasures, to be sure – a corker of a kiss here, an Otis Redding-backed barroom slink there – but frankly, I'm a little weary of Wong wearing "that same old shaggy dress."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I COULD do without "Dancing Queen" stuck in my head, but that will unstick soon enough, and with any luck so too will the memory of Streep noodling on an air guitar.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Luhrmann wants it all – comedy and tragedy, bombast and wet-eyed sentimentality. When it works, his kid-in-a-candy-store giddiness is infectious. When it doesn't – when he goes from silly to turgid in 60 seconds flat – he punctures Australia's proportions down from epic to simply overwrought.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Something is terribly amiss when the American actors sound like English is their second language.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It comes as no surprise that the film is less about fandom as it is about the community fans create with one another – who else to turn to when the object of your affection, your enduring obsession, blows big chunks? – and Fanboys, a likable, shaggy picture, pays nice tribute to that community.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The stripped-down title gets at what we're really here for: the cars. Are they fast? Check. Are they furious? Yep.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Cornpone caricatures abound (witness "Hoedown Throwdown," in which Miley sunnily urges us to "pop it, lock it, polka dot it"), but so do worthy messages about responsibility – to family, community, even Mother Earth.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Still, when The Yellow Handkerchief finally hooks into the meat of Hamill’s source story, the narrative tension puts enough wind in the film’s sails to arrive at its corny but sentimentally satisfying conclusion.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ambrose owns this crawlspace between being fierce and being fragile. But she can't escape the fact that her role is underwritten; the script suffers from an excess of subtlety.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    If you shy away from that sick feeling in the pit of the stomach that comes when watching good people make bad decisions, then best to steer clear of Manito, a low-budget indie that reaches near-Greek proportions of tragedy brought on by lousy decision-making.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Yes, this is the stuff of fiction, where individuals can drift in and out of another's life and make extraordinary, unbelievable things happen.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Silly, predictable, and, dare I say it, oddly endearing, Hackers is the first film I've seen in a long while that annoyed me so much I actually enjoyed it.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    For every zinger, there are two flat jokes around the corner.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film is by no means a disaster. Possession is prettily performed, prettily put-together. Yet, for a story set so firmly in the center of a fire, LaBute and his players have suited themselves in some mighty flame-retardant threads.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The filmmakers no doubt had a hell of a time whittling the material down; unfortunately, what they came up with was something long on the mundaneness of GovWorks.com and short on the personalities behind it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Fact is, good looks will go a long way in masking mediocrity, and Hollywood Homicide capitalizes on that fact doubly so: Co-writer/director Ron Shelton’s latest boasts two pretty faces, and all across the country, mothers and daughters sigh alike.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s just too much drama for one modest film to service adequately. In an effort to cram it all in, scenes abruptly jump from one to the next with nary a smooth transition in sight, relationships evolve far too quickly, and certain subplots drop out of the mix only to resurface, jarringly, much later.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's like 90 minutes of teasing foreplay, and then, just when it's about to get really good, your partner rolls over and goes to sleep.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Life at least deserves a nod for supplying the mostly dramatic actress with her first starring comedic role.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It goes down easy, with likable performances and a laudable emphasis on love and compassion.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The landscape and the lovers are pretty to look at, but two households divided should really pack more of a punch.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    That's the ultimate cheat in this pleasant, but trifling affair: Allen has cheated himself out of an actress (Leoni) that could have been Diane Keaton's heir.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's impossible to shake the feeling that these are merely actors -- albeit good ones.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The action is constant, often pointless, definitely gratuitous, and breathlessly fun.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Failed feminist statement or not, Coyote Ugly is a likable, if confused film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Feels like a Fincher film: It possesses the same smarts, the same visual panache, the same violence. But not the same heart.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    What it needs is a little more dirtying down. What it needs, in short, is less New York, and more Alabama.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's kinda funny and pretty cute. Sometimes that's all it takes.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Until Hollywood stops being a boys club, and America graduates beyond short pants and its embarrassingly pubescent attitudes toward sex, I suppose one can only hope that all male adolescent fantasies will play as goofily sweet as this one.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Scooby's just so dang cute, what's the point in grousing?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A certain inevitability hangs over The Mother – as if any of this could end well – but if Kureishi's framework is perhaps predictable, his knotty, complex characters are not.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Big, dumb, and fun.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ultimately Hedges’ film, like the turkey, comes out underdone.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Phillips and co-writer Scot Armstrong waste too much time on a silly love-interest subplot for Wilson; that time is much better served by the frat-boy idiocies, like Frank beer-bonging himself into streaking.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The exceedingly silly Super Troopers is an earnest, mostly funny spoof.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Overall, Just Married doesn't really take -- it has a shelf life about as short as the disastrous honeymoon -- but in the moment, it's cute, if corny. It'll do.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Has a heart bursting with good intentions, something that goes a long way in dimming from memory its inherent routineness.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The elements are all here for something spectacular – and in brilliant bursts, Jeunet really gets it – but in the end, all that potential is sunk by a terminally confused tone and milquetoast pairing of lovers. Pity that.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Two hours pass painlessly enough, thanks to the affability of its trio of leads, Hathaway, Andrews, and Elizondo.