Kimberley Jones
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For 697 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 All the Real Girls
Lowest review score: 0 Someone Like You...
Score distribution:
697 movie reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Never thrills on an emotional level the way the best of sports films – a "Hoosiers," say – can, but it's a satisfying entertainment nonetheless.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Two Eighties genre staples – Disease-of-the-Week and Poppin' the Cherry – meet, shake hands, and mostly play nice in this sweet, if overly earnest feature.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Cornpone caricatures abound (witness "Hoedown Throwdown," in which Miley sunnily urges us to "pop it, lock it, polka dot it"), but so do worthy messages about responsibility – to family, community, even Mother Earth.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Luhrmann wants it all – comedy and tragedy, bombast and wet-eyed sentimentality. When it works, his kid-in-a-candy-store giddiness is infectious. When it doesn't – when he goes from silly to turgid in 60 seconds flat – he punctures Australia's proportions down from epic to simply overwrought.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A certain inevitability hangs over The Mother – as if any of this could end well – but if Kureishi's framework is perhaps predictable, his knotty, complex characters are not.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film's best stretch, wherein each American gal is romanced by an international lover, faintly recalling the Fifties' sudser "Three Coins in the Fountain."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The jokes hit about half the time – the best bits have an off-the-cuff feel – and it’s pocked with the kind of rom-com clichés that are practically written in stone (screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna's script for "The Devil Wears Prada" was far sharper).
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Frozen can count in its favor visual grandeur, two energetic young women as co-leads, and a couple of plot twists that place the film a cut above your average princess fare.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It comes as no surprise that the film is less about fandom as it is about the community fans create with one another – who else to turn to when the object of your affection, your enduring obsession, blows big chunks? – and Fanboys, a likable, shaggy picture, pays nice tribute to that community.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ambling, just-passable picture.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Occasional animated inserts inspired by Chantry’s work as an illustrator, while accomplished, inject an off-note of whimsy that doesn’t quite square with the script’s stabs at edgier humor.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This con artist caper from the writer/director duo behind "Bad Santa" and "I Love You Philip Morris" bears some superficial resemblance to the 2005 romantic comedy "Hitch."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Gondry’s well-meaning but too soft, too structure-less picture.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    In his short career (The Station Agent, The Visitor), McCarthy has established himself as a craftsman of conventionally quirky pictures that are ENTIRELY about ingratiating themselves with the audience.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Wright is terrific – sensitive and alert – in the live-action opening. But that opening runs more than 45 minutes long, a way too heavy-handed preamble to the crazed animation to come, and the actress’ vocal delivery – soft-spoken, gently bewildered – is too soporific to pull off lines like, “Look at me, I’m your prophet of doom.”
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It has a basic goodness of heart that counteracts, if not entirely cancels out, the film's broadness and busyness.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The exceedingly silly Super Troopers is an earnest, mostly funny spoof.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Far more interesting than Juli and Bryce's banal budding love is Reiner and co-scripter Andrew Scheinman's sensitive exploration of how parents shape their children.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film never recovers its initial fizzy-pop charms, owing largely to pacing that turns positively molasses-slow in the second act.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Two hours pass painlessly enough, thanks to the affability of its trio of leads, Hathaway, Andrews, and Elizondo.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    For every zinger, there are two flat jokes around the corner.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Imagine "Little Miss Sunshine's" dark materials (and superior craftsmanship) diluted with a Hannah Montana-like sunny silliness – which is to say: sometimes funny, often broad-stroked, ever sweet, and landing shy of its potential.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Despite his character's fondness for mugging and mouthing like Michael Corleone, Spacey (and by extension, his director and writer Norman Snider) can't quite catch the operatic wallop of Corleone's arc, possibly because the film is played top-to-bottom like a caprice.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Terrio's technically proficient film is mature, modern, and minus the all-important passion and risk.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect a second viewing would uncover more information embedded in the mise-en-scène; had Trance – tonally a jumble and disorienting to the point of distraction – rewarded the audience with the pure perfection of a Keyser Söze-like reveal, I’d be more inclined to make the return trip.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The cast seems to have been assembled primarily for its blinking resemblance to the stars of the original Eighties TV series about a renegade group of former Army Rangers now for hire.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There's no denying the dazzling effect, but a fireworks sequence midfilm only underscores the sad fact that there's no lasting illumination here, only the fast-burn spitzing of bang snaps.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There are no hard answers in Room 237, a feature-length, sporadically engaging exploration of the latter (The Shining).
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Feels like a Fincher film: It possesses the same smarts, the same visual panache, the same violence. But not the same heart.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Sparks, an acting novice, falters when her character must muster gumption or sexual heat. She saves her best for last in a barnburner singing performance, but it's too little, too late – especially with the memory of Houston's one song – a heart-stopping gospel number – still ringing in the ears.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's impossible to shake the feeling that these are merely actors -- albeit good ones.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Fairly uninspiring, but it still manages to ingratiate itself, largely through the efforts of Krasinski in a secondary part.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's unclear where the buck stops in terms of creative authority – at one point, Clayman complains that "the only thing I feel in control of is the money" – which renders OC87 at once a remarkable achievement, and a fatally compromised film.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Frustrations abound with this limited film, but Wild Horse, Wild Ride does one thing exceptionally well, and that is convey the emotional bond between trainer and horse.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    If I may presume: Thatcher probably would have preferred more action, less talk.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The movie lumbers on some more, reiterating the obvious and relying on overfamiliar imagery. Audiences have a long year to wait for Part 2. Would it not have been better to leave them breathless than heaving a sigh?
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Failed feminist statement or not, Coyote Ugly is a likable, if confused film.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Big, dumb, and fun.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The final conflict is so protracted as to comfortably accommodate a bathroom break. Don't worry. You won't miss anything you haven't seen before.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    For better or worse (and I'd argue the latter), the aliens are as monolithically evil, unformed, and un-individuated as characters as Native Americans once were in the earliest of Westerns.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Perfectly passable film.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Has a heart bursting with good intentions, something that goes a long way in dimming from memory its inherent routineness.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Once the film gets cooking, the questions never stop. For instance: When you find the dead body of someone you love, isn’t your first call to the cops?
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The real tension of the piece lies in the sound design, with its layering of heavy breaths, inexplicably compromised frequencies, and invasive thwackings of no known origin to the ship hull.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Hopelessly old-fashioned then, but not the aggressively bad picture you might have anticipated.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Gilroy zings the film with tantalizing bits of absurdity (one wonders, wistfully, what the Coen brothers would have done with this material), but too often he returns to his darker, more ponderous instincts.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Until Hollywood stops being a boys club, and America graduates beyond short pants and its embarrassingly pubescent attitudes toward sex, I suppose one can only hope that all male adolescent fantasies will play as goofily sweet as this one.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I suppose when you make a movie, however tangentially, about Viagra, you're required to insert at least one scene of its side effects, but the broadness with which Zwick plays it out is like a stake to the heart of the film's hard-earned but fast-lost authenticity.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Fletcher demonstrates, as with her second film, "27 Dresses," that she can put together a funny, able romantic comedy that is a cut above, but no more. Still, those leads are awfully likable, the Massachusetts-for-Alaska landscape rather picturesque, and if The Proposal doesn't reinvent the wheel, merrily we roll along nonetheless.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This Native American romantic comedy, which won the Audience Award at the 2001 Austin Film Festival, arrives in theatres four years late but seasonally right on time.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There’s a surprising – and truthful – melancholic undercurrent to Definitely, Maybe – the one commonality between the three women is the heartbreak they induce – but Brooks undermines that truthfulness with a dogmatic insistence upon romantic mythologizing. No maybes about it: The reality is far darker, and more interesting.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Roberts, wearing that beatific half-smile of hers that suggests inner peace and wisdom before she's even begun her journey, is too open-faced with her emotions to signal the complexities of Gilbert's distress – over her divorce, her control issues, her rootlessness, and inability to live in the moment.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ultimately Hedges’ film, like the turkey, comes out underdone.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Brothers is too depthless to dredge up any tears.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A romantic comedy, too, but this time the romance is between two women, and one of them, truth be told, is a dud.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Wanderlust is flawed, too, but for its exploration of financial ruin and alternative lifestyles, it shows once again that Aniston, at the very least, knows which way the wind is blowing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There is a plot – a pretty clunky one, jerry-rigged with character motivations that amount to one long “huh?” and dialogue that might as well have been chunked out of a cliche generator – but who needs plot when we can have mayhem?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The elements are all here for something spectacular – and in brilliant bursts, Jeunet really gets it – but in the end, all that potential is sunk by a terminally confused tone and milquetoast pairing of lovers. Pity that.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The action is constant, often pointless, definitely gratuitous, and breathlessly fun.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The very best animation can excite the senses and inflame the imagination. But Chico & Rito's charmless line drawings just made me wish the film was live-action instead.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This is in fact the end – it is what is. We’ve had some good laughs. Let’s part amicably.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's like 90 minutes of teasing foreplay, and then, just when it's about to get really good, your partner rolls over and goes to sleep.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ambrose owns this crawlspace between being fierce and being fragile. But she can't escape the fact that her role is underwritten; the script suffers from an excess of subtlety.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Well, we're not in "Chicago" anymore, or even its soundstage approximation, but that hasn't stopped Oscar-nominated director Rob Marshall from fashioning another epic spectacle out of two squabbling women in (a sort-of) show business.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    “Caution: Contents may induce brain bleed.” That is, if you think too hard on the logic and mechanics of its time-travel conceit.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's kinda funny and pretty cute. Sometimes that's all it takes.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s all supremely silly stuff, and amusingly so, as long as you don’t stop to think about all those blameless officers and agents cut down in the line of mindless entertainment.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Overall, Just Married doesn't really take -- it has a shelf life about as short as the disastrous honeymoon -- but in the moment, it's cute, if corny. It'll do.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Something is terribly amiss when the American actors sound like English is their second language.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's a Big Idea movie that comes out only half-baked.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The bestselling first book in yet another dystopic Young Adult series, Veronica Roth’s Divergent is engrossing enough to devour overnight, and flimsy enough to forget by morning light. Neil Burger’s film adaptation faithfully reproduces the same effect.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film holds its twists too close to the chest, and there's little to chew on till the ambitiousness of its plotting is revealed late in the film.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Instantly forgettable but intermittently funny movie.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    For the first 30 minutes I couldn't shake the feeling that I was watching a really promising pilot for network TV.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Morris has found a real character in McKinney, but to what end, I couldn't say.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    We have pretty much all the information we need within the first half-hour, which undercuts the supposedly climactic reveal of the contents of Maruge's letter and renders the torturous flashbacks unnecessary for narrative purposes. And not a little bit sadomasochistic, too – an ill fit for a PG-13 family film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Sugar is a curiosity – too somber for a picaresque, too arm's-length for much emotional effect – and while it's interesting, it's never truly absorbing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s just too much drama for one modest film to service adequately. In an effort to cram it all in, scenes abruptly jump from one to the next with nary a smooth transition in sight, relationships evolve far too quickly, and certain subplots drop out of the mix only to resurface, jarringly, much later.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The ideas are there, hints of genius, but no one ignites them. Add Osmosis Jones to that list of universal enigmas, and, more specifically, how the Farrelly Brothers could have done so little with so much.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Midway through, there’s a truly riotous set-piece involving Bruiser’s gay love affair with a Great Dane, but not even a Chihuahua in leather bondage gear can zest up a franchise that has degraded from sleeper to snoozer.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In all his misguided enthusiasm, Parker has mustered enough bluster to fill up a zeppelin, blowing harder and harder, for something more and more fanciful. But with so much hot air, the bubble is bound to burst, and so it does in Parker's blundering adaptation.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Luhrmann has always had a knack with the fever of passion, but here he only catches high fever’s empty gibberish.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A decent enough spot of silliness.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Kit Kittredge is a dutiful bore. Still, I couldn't help but wonder if, in the face of all-out market collapse, it might serve a dual purpose as primer for kiddies on economic depression – because food stamps always taste better with a side order of spunk. Or is it pluck?
    • 18 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Saving Christmas will hold little interest for anyone not already a believer. It’s too single-minded in its instructional purpose, too averse to multidimensional characters, too youth-pastor-like in its dorky humor.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In the end, we know Andie and Ben will kiss and make up -– how could too alliteratively aligned pretty people not? -– but first we must wade through the protracted and wholly unwarranted period in which both huffs about the other’s deceptions.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This isn’t Nicole Kidman’s first dalliance with witchcraft, and it is one of Bewitched’s unfortunate achievements that it actually makes one pine for Kidman’s 1998 dud, "Practical Magic." That witch at least had some sass; this cardigan-clad witch, alas, is an altogether more benign being, and by "benign" I mean boring.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Amusing enough, but weirdly joyless.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    To say the least, the chemistry is lacking; equally unconvincing is the all-British cast’s attempts at American accents.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A lot of gunk: dance-offs, sing-alongs, awkward exes, and a dirty-talking White blasting through, I'm afraid, the last bits of her novelty. That again?
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Wouldn't it make more sense on basic cable? Plum screen incarnate (and film producer) Katherine Heigl got her start in TV, on Roswell and Grey's Anatomy, and her public persona – a combination of prickliness and adoration-seeking that has famously grated on viewers' and critics' nerves alike – has historically played better there.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In manipulating its many disparate characters to bump into each other and set plot lines in motion, Intermission walks a fine line between clever and contrived, with the scale tipping more often toward contrived.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As the songs pile up and the plot putters along, Romance & Cigarettes wears thin, like a moral for the titular addiction: Sure, there’s the sweet dream of that first drag, but a whole pack’ll do a body bad.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Leaves me wanting to watch Tomei and company in something more worthy of their abilities.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A lightweight, intermittently engaging comedy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The promising-sounding football movie would turn out to be a movie about men talking on phones.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's some funny stuff here that doesn't involve degrading its female protagonists, and the cast, by and large, is appealing.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A bright idea, disappointingly dulled in the execution.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The first act is very nearly unbearable, leaden and doomy and generically plotted.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As is, it's simply too much information crammed too haphazardly into a running time that at times borders on interminable.

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