For 666 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 2046
Lowest review score: 0 View from the Top
Score distribution:
666 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Still, when The Yellow Handkerchief finally hooks into the meat of Hamill’s source story, the narrative tension puts enough wind in the film’s sails to arrive at its corny but sentimentally satisfying conclusion.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It has a basic goodness of heart that counteracts, if not entirely cancels out, the film's broadness and busyness.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The cast seems to have been assembled primarily for its blinking resemblance to the stars of the original Eighties TV series about a renegade group of former Army Rangers now for hire.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The supposedly epic battle the entire film builds toward – the single action set-piece – is a ho-hummer. Fire and ice, turns out, was an oversell: Think tepid tap water instead.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Girl Who Played With Fire's chief frustration is in how removed Salander and Blomkvist are from each other.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Far more interesting than Juli and Bryce's banal budding love is Reiner and co-scripter Andrew Scheinman's sensitive exploration of how parents shape their children.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Roberts, wearing that beatific half-smile of hers that suggests inner peace and wisdom before she's even begun her journey, is too open-faced with her emotions to signal the complexities of Gilbert's distress – over her divorce, her control issues, her rootlessness, and inability to live in the moment.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It runs the stopwatch on a chase sequence to a comical extreme and takes way, way too long to take its final bow, in the process burning off any residual goodwill.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I suppose when you make a movie, however tangentially, about Viagra, you're required to insert at least one scene of its side effects, but the broadness with which Zwick plays it out is like a stake to the heart of the film's hard-earned but fast-lost authenticity.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Morning Glory had the capacity to be a smarter, tarter picture, though it's not bad as is: well-acted and ingratiating, with at least one howlingly funny sequence.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Despite his character's fondness for mugging and mouthing like Michael Corleone, Spacey (and by extension, his director and writer Norman Snider) can't quite catch the operatic wallop of Corleone's arc, possibly because the film is played top-to-bottom like a caprice.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Paul is offensive solely for being so underachieving.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    In his short career (The Station Agent, The Visitor), McCarthy has established himself as a craftsman of conventionally quirky pictures that are ENTIRELY about ingratiating themselves with the audience.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Fairly uninspiring, but it still manages to ingratiate itself, largely through the efforts of Krasinski in a secondary part.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    We have pretty much all the information we need within the first half-hour, which undercuts the supposedly climactic reveal of the contents of Maruge's letter and renders the torturous flashbacks unnecessary for narrative purposes. And not a little bit sadomasochistic, too – an ill fit for a PG-13 family film.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It IS consistently funny. Its trash-can humor is tasteless, no doubt, but hey, that doesn't make it unpalatable.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film's best stretch, wherein each American gal is romanced by an international lover, faintly recalling the Fifties' sudser "Three Coins in the Fountain."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The final conflict is so protracted as to comfortably accommodate a bathroom break. Don't worry. You won't miss anything you haven't seen before.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    For better or worse (and I'd argue the latter), the aliens are as monolithically evil, unformed, and un-individuated as characters as Native Americans once were in the earliest of Westerns.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Instantly forgettable but intermittently funny movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Morris has found a real character in McKinney, but to what end, I couldn't say.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Help may be more interested in the moral at the end of the story than the story itself, but what saves the film from its meticulous one-dimensionality is that nuanced, deeply moving cast.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The real tension of the piece lies in the sound design, with its layering of heavy breaths, inexplicably compromised frequencies, and invasive thwackings of no known origin to the ship hull.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    For the first 30 minutes I couldn't shake the feeling that I was watching a really promising pilot for network TV.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A grinning but toothless comedy, this Christmas-themed outing pales in inventiveness compared to the original, which brought sweet, silly anarchy to its one-thing-leads-to-another plotting.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    If I may presume: Thatcher probably would have preferred more action, less talk.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Wanderlust is flawed, too, but for its exploration of financial ruin and alternative lifestyles, it shows once again that Aniston, at the very least, knows which way the wind is blowing.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The very best animation can excite the senses and inflame the imagination. But Chico & Rito's charmless line drawings just made me wish the film was live-action instead.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Duplass brothers have an exceptional eye for microexpressions (yes, they're still zoom-happy), and there's something to be admired in this new interest in a macro lens on the universe's workings. If only it didn't take wading through so much drear to get to that divine.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Hopelessly old-fashioned then, but not the aggressively bad picture you might have anticipated.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film holds its twists too close to the chest, and there's little to chew on till the ambitiousness of its plotting is revealed late in the film.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Rather born to wear a frock coat, Dancy shares the stammer-blush, winning-grin methodology of countryman Hugh Grant, only with more probity and better posture.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    What's translated to film feels like a rough draft, with bullet points at beginning and end, demarcating Lola lost, Lola found. And in the middle? A vast, vague maw.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ambling, just-passable picture.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Sparks, an acting novice, falters when her character must muster gumption or sexual heat. She saves her best for last in a barnburner singing performance, but it's too little, too late – especially with the memory of Houston's one song – a heart-stopping gospel number – still ringing in the ears.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's unclear where the buck stops in terms of creative authority – at one point, Clayman complains that "the only thing I feel in control of is the money" – which renders OC87 at once a remarkable achievement, and a fatally compromised film.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Frustrations abound with this limited film, but Wild Horse, Wild Ride does one thing exceptionally well, and that is convey the emotional bond between trainer and horse.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Chbosky surrounds his hurting characters with the cinematic equivalent of a hug circle – which is sweet, but rather antithetical to tension-building.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Imagine "Little Miss Sunshine's" dark materials (and superior craftsmanship) diluted with a Hannah Montana-like sunny silliness – which is to say: sometimes funny, often broad-stroked, ever sweet, and landing shy of its potential.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There's no denying the dazzling effect, but a fireworks sequence midfilm only underscores the sad fact that there's no lasting illumination here, only the fast-burn spitzing of bang snaps.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Lucas and Moore aren’t savvy enough, or brave enough, to truly plumb the gallows humor embedded in their premise.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Once the film gets cooking, the questions never stop. For instance: When you find the dead body of someone you love, isn’t your first call to the cops?
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There are no hard answers in Room 237, a feature-length, sporadically engaging exploration of the latter (The Shining).
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect a second viewing would uncover more information embedded in the mise-en-scène; had Trance – tonally a jumble and disorienting to the point of distraction – rewarded the audience with the pure perfection of a Keyser Söze-like reveal, I’d be more inclined to make the return trip.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There is a plot – a pretty clunky one, jerry-rigged with character motivations that amount to one long “huh?” and dialogue that might as well have been chunked out of a cliche generator – but who needs plot when we can have mayhem?
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This is in fact the end – it is what is. We’ve had some good laughs. Let’s part amicably.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Product placement aside, there’s an admirable, even sweet, message about fellowship and misfit pride shot through the whole script, and Vaughn is rather touching as a kind of cuddly uncle figure to his fellow interns.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s not like Monsters University is a bad movie. It’s just not a terribly interesting one.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s all supremely silly stuff, and amusingly so, as long as you don’t stop to think about all those blameless officers and agents cut down in the line of mindless entertainment.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This is Jackman’s show entirely, and he’s as forceful and charismatic as ever as the walking, talking hurt that is Wolverine. If only he had something more interesting to do here.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Frozen can count in its favor visual grandeur, two energetic young women as co-leads, and a couple of plot twists that place the film a cut above your average princess fare.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is a very pretty production – pretty colors, pretty scenery, pretty bromides – and a busy one, too, which helps distract us from the sad fact that the movie is generous and humane but not all that interesting.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Isaac and Olsen are both mesmerizing actors, and Lange and Felton also do very good work in supporting roles, but their collective gameness – all that acting their pants off (sometimes literally) – is underserved by the film’s script and direction.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The bestselling first book in yet another dystopic Young Adult series, Veronica Roth’s Divergent is engrossing enough to devour overnight, and flimsy enough to forget by morning light. Neil Burger’s film adaptation faithfully reproduces the same effect.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A lightweight, intermittently engaging comedy.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The soundtrack is a boisterous blast from the past, and there's a quiet pleasure to watching Zoe and Daly let their composure loose like scrambled eggs, but there's little else to hold dear here.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Starts out as a lark, but veers into grittier, more emotionally complex territory -- just like a real relationship -- that the film doesn't have the chops to sustain.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Not a man, but the romanticizing of him. A lot of jive-shit.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It's a nice, friendly kind of love, but hardly an inspiring one.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The whole thing still reeks of voyeurism -- and not the fly-on-the-wall voyeurism of a vérité doc, but rather the dirty-old-man-in-the-peep-show-booth kind. Might as well just wait for it to hit late-night cable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Warmed my heart about as much as the cold cream Angèle slathers all over her wrinkling clients.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    After two hours of Vera's pretty but wet-blanket direction, it's too late to ignite any fireworks, even in the hands of such capable actors.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's something good-natured, even sweet about this well-meaning affair.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A clever idea that never stretches beyond just that -- a caterpillar that never blooms into a butterfly.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It doesn't have the bite to be satire, the pratfalls to be broad comedy, or the wit to pass as a comedy of manners. What does that leave? The French cinematic equivalent of motivational coaching, and -- just like Pignon -- something spectacularly unspectacular.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The film's "never grow up" refrain plays like a broken record, until, in an abrupt (but not unexpected) turnaround at film's end, it fixes itself.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There are flashes of wit and flair here, including two stylish sequences detailing the French obsession with food and scarves, but they are but brief respites from the film’s near-pathological drear.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The resultant film is all surface and plush, with nary a hard edge or demanding note. Despite the movie's well-intentioned heart, its head is out to lunch, neglecting its responsibility to provide these powerhouse actresses with a script half as smart or compelling as they.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Undone by Blanchett's dull, wooden delivery. She's the pap that kills the pulp the rest of the film is bellowing out to be.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The ideas are there, hints of genius, but no one ignites them. Add Osmosis Jones to that list of universal enigmas, and, more specifically, how the Farrelly Brothers could have done so little with so much.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In all his misguided enthusiasm, Parker has mustered enough bluster to fill up a zeppelin, blowing harder and harder, for something more and more fanciful. But with so much hot air, the bubble is bound to burst, and so it does in Parker's blundering adaptation.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The script negates anything heartfelt with its flippant, almost vulgar tone.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    To say the least, the chemistry is lacking; equally unconvincing is the all-British cast’s attempts at American accents.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The movie scores some laughs, all of which come from the expert Giamatti.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Doesn't do much to further distinguish Lehmann's career. As for those of us waiting for the year's first worthwhile date movie, the wait continues.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Bruce Almighty attempts to blend both sides of the actor – comedic and dramatic – and while Carrey achieved that balance quite wonderfully in "The Truman Show," Bruce Almighty doesn't so much straddle the fence as impale itself on it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Little more than a constant and occasionally pretty imaginative sex show.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The climax, like the film itself, is big, loud, and looks cool enough, which is what we’ve come to expect from summer movies … but not from Robert Rodriguez.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    When the boys are tossing balls around and bopping in time to Notorious B.I.G., they -- and the film -- are right-on.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Midway through, there’s a truly riotous set-piece involving Bruiser’s gay love affair with a Great Dane, but not even a Chihuahua in leather bondage gear can zest up a franchise that has degraded from sleeper to snoozer.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In the end, we know Andie and Ben will kiss and make up -– how could too alliteratively aligned pretty people not? -– but first we must wade through the protracted and wholly unwarranted period in which both huffs about the other’s deceptions.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Instantly forgettable but good-natured all the same.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A film that is long on atmosphere, but short on smarts: Plot points are easily unraveled 20 minutes in advance (no fun sleuthing for the audience here), the ending is an unsatisfying pastiche off too many horror tropes, and it would take a week to plug all of Gothika’s gaps in logic.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's just no reconciling the film's ambivalent message. Newell hangs a modern sensibility on a supposed period piece, and hangs his film in the process.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    When The Company owns up to what it is -– a performance piece -– it’s glorious. Everything else -– the window-dressing of a fiction film -– just gums up that gloriousness.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Their travelogue-ready romance is utterly doofy but not disagreeable, and this sort of wish-fulfillment fantasy will strike the right chord with Moore’s fan base of preteen girls.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The bland script and direction are spruced up by a likable cast.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In manipulating its many disparate characters to bump into each other and set plot lines in motion, Intermission walks a fine line between clever and contrived, with the scale tipping more often toward contrived.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The trouble with retooling fairy tales to jibe with our more enlightened times is that too often the fun gets stripped along with the offensive parts.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Although the transvestites’ plight – mishandled, misunderstood, and/or misappropriated – is meant to supply Connie and Carla's emotional core, one never gets the feeling of anything stronger than an at-shoulder-length's sympathy from this film.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Knoxville, in his first dramatic role, does what he can with script and direction that aggressively eschew any insight into Kaufman's grief.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In terms of a pre-teen instructional, Sleepover offers throughout a laudable emphasis on the importance of friendship, but parents may rightfully flinch at a protagonist who is ultimately rewarded for breaking all the rules.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Perhaps the more appropriate question to put to this remake would be "What the hell’s the point?"
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Grace and Johannson's courtship has all the heat of a wet wipe and, worse yet, leaves Quaid offscreen for long stretches.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Either you like your movies to be, well, movie-like: imitations of life, with musical accompaniment and artificial lighting and tracking shots and looped dialogue; or you like them to be re-creations of life, sans the artifice. The King Is Alive clearly falls into the latter camp.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Leaves me wanting to watch Tomei and company in something more worthy of their abilities.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It's all pretty goofy, which I assume is the point, but it's also pretty dull.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    I’m all for ambiguity, but Dear Frankie’s multiple dangling threads indicate incoherent storytelling, not profundity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As is, it's simply too much information crammed too haphazardly into a running time that at times borders on interminable.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This isn’t Nicole Kidman’s first dalliance with witchcraft, and it is one of Bewitched’s unfortunate achievements that it actually makes one pine for Kidman’s 1998 dud, "Practical Magic." That witch at least had some sass; this cardigan-clad witch, alas, is an altogether more benign being, and by "benign" I mean boring.