Kimberley Jones
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For 681 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Before Night Falls
Lowest review score: 0 The Women
Score distribution:
681 movie reviews
    • 95 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Blisteringly entertaining.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's a mistake to confuse Zero Dark Thirty for "truth" – that would be a disservice to the high level of craftsmanship, from first-billed actors to below-the-line production crew, at work in this movie fiction – but there is admirably little fat on its bones.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The tension is enough to make you slightly sick, and the overall mood of the thing is deeply dispiriting, but then, nobody ever said that war isn't hell.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Shot in winter grays with no warming ambers and the whiff of tuberculosis hanging around all the players, Inside Llewyn Davis is a chilly thing – a nominal comedy in brisk shivers.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I laughed more (sincerely, full-throatedly) at Toy Story 3’s smart comedy than at any other film of the still-young summer movie slate.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A triumph in anguish.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Her
    If in previous films "Adaptation" and "Being John Malkovich" Jonze seemed a little squirmy about sex, his treatment here is fully adult and keenly sensitive to the complexities of sexual intimacy – how it relates to emotional intimacy, whether or not a flesh-and-blood body is required to achieve it.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It isn't about where you get, but how you get there -- and the getting there is a chewy delight.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A lovely, quietly thrilling thing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I don't know if the many plot swerves withstand a second viewing, but I suspect the meat of the matter – the swooning visuals, the expert choreography, the teasing love story – does.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Bahrani's small marvel of a film.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The fault does not lie with Hoffman (who doesn't so much act out Capote's distinctive mannerisms and high-pitched lisp as channel them); his performance is undeniably great. Everything else – solid, satisfying though it may be – falls short of that greatness.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Blue Is the Warmest Color has its wobbles, but Exarchopoulos will knock you sideways.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    The Grand Budapest Hotel is nothing short of an enchantment.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    100 minutes spent watching children struggle and delight in learning is, at least in my book, 100 minutes happily spent.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Audience fortitude aside: This is compulsively watchable stuff, a masterstroke of thoughtful direction and thought-provoking performance.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Part 2 is something else altogether. Such digital effects as the marauding giants that squash baby wizards like bugs or the inky terror that is the Death Eaters – acolytes to the mad, bad wizard Voldemort (Fiennes) – are magnificent and experienced in one long, clutched breath. But what's missing is what has been the chief pleasure of the series: the chemistry between its young leads.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Sweet-spirited and sometimes meandering but always working in the service of its young protagonists’ perspective, We Are the Best! might come off as slight if you aren’t paying attention, or you pay too much attention to the too-cute closing credits montage.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    His (Spielberg) is an old-fashioned style of moviemaking that can produce soaring entertainment or, alternately, a fussed-over theatricality. Minute to minute, Lincoln moves between these extremes.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The actors, as a powerful and convincing ensemble, are equally understated and just as devastating.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Moments of almost unbearable beauty.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The balloon will resurface throughout, but far more interesting, and substantial, is the slow reveal of Simon's domestic situation.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    It's huge and bewildering and it hurts to watch, but it hurts so good it's gorgeous.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Writer/director Lonergan succeeds at capturing eloquently the disappointments of growing up and growing old. But he isn't always successful at reining in the schmaltz.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The scoped camerawork is a shrewd tactic; only occasionally does its flat, proscenium effect make the action feel overly staged.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    One wishes for a chewier whodunit – there just aren't enough clues for the viewer to work with – and the reveal of the mole is perversely anticlimactic. But maybe that's just stickling. We always knew Smiley'd get his man.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    Do we ever get the whole truth? Only this: The past is never the past. In Farhadi’s wounding worldview, the past is the present and, most certainly, the future, too.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s not quite as brutalizing as McEwan’s brilliant source novel – it bears too much of a Great Art buff – but it ravishes nonetheless in its grand exploration of the sins of the daughter and a lifetime spent making reparations.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    This revisionist Western – intellectually, aesthetically, and narratively absorbing – rattles to the bone, but never quite rends the heart.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    An absorbing human drama.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Vuillards, however fractured, know one another's rhythms and rituals, and Desplechin knows just how to convey them in the subtlest of ways.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect that, like the Coen brothers, David Lynch, and Wes Anderson -– our American masters of idiosyncrasy -– Kaurismäki has a limited appeal. Those who get him, really get him.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Anderson and his co-writer Roman Coppola have crafted an elegant and emphatic metaphor for adolescence, that tumultuous province of firsts and lasts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    When the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River began construction in the early Nineties, an estimated 2 million people's lives were impacted. That's a staggering number to contemplate, but Up the Yangtze effectively personalizes that near-meaningless number by putting a face on at least a few of those 2 million.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The deeply heartfelt Milk is more of a surface skim: a fairly standard biopic – if a very fine one, indeed – but never the transcendent work one would have hoped from the filmmaker or his subject.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Looper makes a full-meal entertainment out of piecemealing genres: It boasts the kicky mental gymnastics that come with time-travel terrain, the relentless rapid heart rate of a crackerjack thriller, and the bursts of extreme violence, buttressed with black humor, of a modern actioner.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Descendants is beautifully shot (by Phedon Papamichael) and compellingly performed, especially by its young stars, and it has moments of startling tenderness. If only it didn't feel phony to its bones.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Snowpiercer holds its own; it’s an unruly but rattling – and ravishing – work of art. On first watch, I wondered if there was anything to scratch beneath the surface – it seemed so straightforward, I worried there wasn’t enough there there – so I rewatched it almost right away and was surprised to find it still left me panting.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Far more engrossing are the long, dialogue-free stretches that fix on, say, bobbing feet or curled fists on a speed bag. The soundscape, too, is endlessly fascinating, a layer cake of squeaks, grunts, gasps, and rattling chains that, combined, catches a rhythm that sounds an awful lot like song.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This is an animated film that happily has room for both an existentialist dread of death and a grinning joie de vivre.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Sollett’s first feature is a small, but indelible picture, one that approaches the most universal of themes -– first love, confused hormones, parental clashes -– with originality.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Excepting the occasional shot that forces the eye on a particular dancer, Wenders largely films the action in a way that re-creates the effect of attending a performance in a proscenium theatre – only without having to scrabble for the best seat in the house. No matter where you are, you're already in it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The middle is terrific, especially in a lengthy, unassuming scene in which the three leads sit, sip drinks, and have a good chat: It marks one of the great celluloid pleasures of the year, so virtuosically written, performed, and filmed is it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The film also inspires, if unconsciously, the viewer to rethink what exactly constitutes art.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Sugar is a curiosity – too somber for a picaresque, too arm's-length for much emotional effect – and while it's interesting, it's never truly absorbing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It packs a hefty emotional wallop.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and touching, Frances Ha may very well be the most eloquent take yet on a generation in flux – a cinematic talk-back to so many Atlantic articles, minus the scolding and the statistics, and uncharacteristically (for Baumbach) uncynical.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Screamingly funny. Like I said, terrific stuff.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An outstanding cast have crafted a delicate, eloquent picture of believable humans in so many gradations of hurt, but it stops just shy of catharsis.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The upshot to a ticking bomb is that it only explodes the once, but Rachel's sister, Kym (Hathaway), goes off again and again.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The pictures are gorgeous, and the words, well, if you listen hard enough, the words say exactly what one needs to hear: that is, to wake up and live.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Blancanieves never lags, per se, it’s just awfully in love with itself: with its gorgeous black and white chiaroscuros and whirling-dervish first-person camera perspectives, the Spanish-guitar-scored dance sequences (that include the undeniable dance of the matador in action), and battering winds of emotional extremes. By the end of this sumptuous and sincerely felt melodrama, I was rather in love with it, too.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Delicious.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    As with "Sunshine," I'd call Juno a family film if only it didn't make teen pregnancy look so sporting. Instead, we'll settle for that rare bird, an indie comedy that uplifts – funny and smart, totally trying to be cool and succeeding, and heartfelt to boot.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Those moments, as affecting as they are, can't surmount the overworkshopped feel of the whole film.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A restless, nervy actor, Hardy seems to get a kick out of tying one hand behind his back. He dominated "The Dark Knight Rises" even with a modified ball gag obscuring most of his face. Here, locked behind a steeling wheel and a conceptual gimmick, he only has the upper half of his body to work with. No surprise to anybody who’s been paying attention: Half a Hardy adds up to a hell of a lot.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Grief doesn't exactly sound like a promising starting point for a love story, but, really, what a bounty Mills presents to us of beauty and buoyancy and possibility.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Fish Tank isn't an easy watch – it's like two hours of ache – but there are rich rewards to be had in the many ways Arnold and her terrific team rend us to and fro.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What's in a name? Lately, less and less. With Daniel Craig's third go at 007, I'm not sure there's much left that distinguishes Bond from Bourne from Batman. They're all slurping from the same soup – think: death-haunted, self-righteous, tight-lipped and -quipped, parkour enthusiast.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It closes the film in what I suspect was intended as something of a happy ending, but it’s unnecessary: Thirty happy years should be happy ending enough.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Nothing short of majestic.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Quite simply, Midnight in Paris is charming – très charmant, to ape the argot of the locals. I say that somewhat tongue-in-cheek, as this is very much an outsider's valentine to the City of Lights.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The World’s End affectionately takes a page from our Fifties sci-fi films.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Cooper mostly tamps down that Sexiest Man Alive demeanor that follows him from film to film, and Lawrence – a continually startling young talent – counterpoises her Bardot beauty with a blistering snarl. They both play hurt people clawing their way toward wellness, but it's Lawrence who makes you feel the hurt in your heart – and the hope that it'll get better soon.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Because Wendy and Lucy is so lean on plot and dialogue, there are long spaces to contemplate Wendy and her situation, and the logistics are mind-boggling.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The sum is something deeply profound: about awkwardness, culture clash, failed connections, and – ultimately – the strength that comes from surviving a trial by fire.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Why wait for 2012? If you're hankering for a taste of the apocalypse, the opening sequence of this eye-opening, stomach-queasing doc has plenty to go on – witness menacing superimpositions on a bleak, blighted landscape – and the hits just keep on coming.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Queen of Versailles encourages the very worst tendencies in the audience: to sneer at the Siegels, to marvel at their tackiness, to root for their fall from grace.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    One wishes perhaps for a more thumping conclusion, but what we have instead is something perfectly in the spirit of the piece, reaffirming that life, big and little, happens in 10 minutes chunks.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There are no hard answers in Room 237, a feature-length, sporadically engaging exploration of the latter (The Shining).
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Quite astonishingly, amidst all the chaos – and there's no better word for Tristram Shandy's inspired, breakneck madness – what emerges is a featherlight, moving meditation on new fatherhood.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Sweetgrass’ unbroken shots of often-repetitive activity have a beguiling quality to them, their very monotony encouraging a deeper absorption and reflection, but hard facts aren’t easy to come by.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Undeniably gripping stuff.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's all about the little things, and the way in which the little things can steal into your heart in big ways.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An entirely sympathetic portrait of the artist at an advancing age. That's right, artist – and to a generation that knows Rivers only as a screeching red-carpet provocateur or as an overknifed monstrosity, that revelation alone is worth the cost of admission.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Kinsey is too tasteful by half, and while it may have its gentle charms, it never thrills.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Post-viewing, I was still coasting on the giddy high of kinetic cinema, only to have the astonishing callousness of its conclusion slowly settle in. It's a better film for it – one only wishes that Reprise on a whole had been of the same mind: a little less cool, a little more cruel. That's where the really good stuff is.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Is nothing if not foreign, but not in the sense of national demarcations of language and custom. It speaks a different cinematic language, one that tosses off the usual rules of camerawork and narrative structure.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An ambitious comedy with not-negligible dramatic depth, but Bell, a first-time feature writer and director, is frankly too generous with her large cast.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Keep the Lights On feels like a first-rate, late-Seventies experimental student film, or early Scorsese. But then the cycle of addiction takes over the film, and the plot about stagnancy ends up stagnating the film itself.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    This documentary does boast some bowl-you-over reveals best experienced blind.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This drama-horror hybrid, set within a New York ballet company, strikes a tone more along the lines of the terrifying hallucinatories of Aronofsky's breakout film, "Requiem for a Dream," revisiting, too, favorite themes of monster mommies and female hysteria.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I can't remember the last time I felt so seduced by a film.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    But for all the film's griminess and doom, bad behavior and bad luck, it's hope that engines Head-On.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Swinton is heartbreaking. She's not just craft; she's high art.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Is nothing if not exquisitely detailed: It's like a blood orange that del Toro spends the film seductively unpeeling, revealing layer upon layer of meaning and pathos.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s always a pleasure to be in the company of Potter, and when looking back at the just-competent first outings – well, baby, you’ve come a long way – but still: Where’s the magic, huh?
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Ramsay is experimental, unconventional, and forever reaching at the gorgeousness in grief and despair. Her film moves slow as molasses, slow as paint drying -– and all the better to see the colors and the complexities.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    A riot of sight and sound that, however baffling, has an irresistible, elemental pull.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Dogme pedigree rarely distracts; there is too much emotional investment to care much about dogmatic fidelity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Cue the footage of Cockettes in spangles and glitter, high-kicking and belting out show tunes at the top of their lungs. Damn, it looks grand.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Provides no revelations and left this viewer, at least, puzzling over whether the picture Cunningham has allowed to develop of him is completely transparent or utterly impenetrable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Filmmakers nicely mix the historical and the tributary, honoring both Bennett's cultural landmark and the dancers who dream of joining its ranks.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    White couldn't stay away, and neither can the band's legions of fans, who bop up and down in sold-out arenas at the reunion tour that provides the film's hopeful coda.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The very best animation can excite the senses and inflame the imagination. But Chico & Rito's charmless line drawings just made me wish the film was live-action instead.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Immigrant is two hours long, but I stayed even longer in my seat, through the credits, still in thrall to it all. The title is singular, but the scope is not so easily quantifiable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The elements are all here for something spectacular – and in brilliant bursts, Jeunet really gets it – but in the end, all that potential is sunk by a terminally confused tone and milquetoast pairing of lovers. Pity that.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An inner-city tragedy that plays its story simply, sorrowfully, and beautifully.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Living in Emergency, then, is like a hard slap to the face: There is nothing remotely romantic about this grim depiction of two missions in Liberia and Congo in the mid-2000s.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Last Station would have satisfied alone as a witty, manic lark, but as it moves toward the titular railway station, the film unfurls into so much more – a work of compassion, modulated mournfulness, and unchecked joy.