Kimberley Jones
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For 683 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 2046
Lowest review score: 0 Stealing Harvard
Score distribution:
683 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Last Station would have satisfied alone as a witty, manic lark, but as it moves toward the titular railway station, the film unfurls into so much more – a work of compassion, modulated mournfulness, and unchecked joy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A funny, seductive, and surprisingly honest dramatization of the ways we snooker ourselves into incompatible love.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    July sees the world in a most unexpected way, and it's a shame that Me and You's preciousness sometimes overwhelms that uniqueness of vision.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all adds up to a portrait in decency, which isn’t nearly as sexy as the title would suggest.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    I laughed, I cried, I longed for a pet dragon to call my own.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Guardians of the Galaxy is an outlier: a space opera in a largely earthbound movie cycle (excepting the occasional red-eye to another dimension in the Thor pictures), candy-colored and bopping where the other Marvel movies are muted and imposing, and the funniest one to date, without a doubt.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's a period piece about the origins of psychoanalysis and the sexual confusions of its progenitors that is eloquent and handsomely made, if never quite revelatory.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mud
    With American independent film teeming with so many shaky-cam snarksters, what an electric riposte to the status quo is Nichols, whose films are classically constructed and deadly serious. In his short but potent career, he’s mastered a wide-vistaed eye for the epic and the elemental.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Going dramatic, Stiller commits to the role completely; there's something rather admirable in his refusal to pander or soft-pedal the self-serious, frankly unlikable Greenberg.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Mamet does a shrewdly skillful job with these Tinseltown terrors.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Director Lenny Abrahamson establishes a twee tone early that renders tinny the transition into melancholy, and it’s a shame the film so clings to Jon’s perspective. The takeaway is as flat as Frank’s mask. Bemused smile, followed by deflated feeling.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    While The Art of the Steal makes a very convincing – even bone-chilling – argument that the people and foundations that essentially hijacked the Barnes Foundation are primarily concerned with tourist dollars and not the preservation of Barnes' legacy, the film fails to even ponder why easier access to some of the world's greatest art treasures might not be an entirely bad thing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Sisley is a former stand-up comic, although you'd never guess it here: Finding himself in the eye of a colossal shit storm of his own making, his Vincent is brusque and action oriented, his face, a picture of ulceration in progress.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Rush, a film about two real-life titans of Formula One racing in the Seventies, splits its narrative between these oil-and-water personalities, which feels about right: It's only half of a good movie.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Just as marriage does not banish aloneness, proximity to the characters onscreen doesn't unlock any special connection to them.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    In his short career (The Station Agent, The Visitor), McCarthy has established himself as a craftsman of conventionally quirky pictures that are ENTIRELY about ingratiating themselves with the audience.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In an age of doggedly unambitious comedy, one marvels at the finesse these first-time screenwriters and director Feig bring to marrying raunch, romantic comedy, and the tested but ever-true bond between women.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The issue of late-term abortions tends to inspire polemics from both sides of the debate; Shane and Wilson’s approach – sensitive, measured, workmanlike – is a welcome one.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The camera may dive deep, but the content skims mere surface.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Hunger Games franchise, both in print and onscreen, has been exceptionally clever about cozying away imaginative space for fans to fill in the blanks and cast themselves in the rich drama. That this latest film leaves us hungering for more only means that it’s working.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s an indie film about abortion that comes snuggled in the broad strokes of a quirky relationship comedy. A grump might wonder when indie films got so soft, but I’m more intrigued by the inverse: Why aren’t more studio films this clever and winning and conversant in the same language as their audience?
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Appropriately belongs to Lopez. His mannequin glaze and never-wavering smile provide more creepy-crawlies than a thousand quivering violins or perfectly timed thunderclaps.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The filmmakers no doubt had a hell of a time whittling the material down; unfortunately, what they came up with was something long on the mundaneness of GovWorks.com and short on the personalities behind it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    These women are marvelous, with ancient, creased faces and the kind of admirable f...-all attitude that comes with age. I couldn't take my eyes off them.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There are no hard truths to be found in Finding Vivian Maier (really, how could there be?), but it’s an engrossing doc nevertheless – a portrait of an American artist hiding in plain sight, a mystery with too few clues, and a sincere inquiry into how best to divine the wishes of the dead.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Morris has found a real character in McKinney, but to what end, I couldn't say.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It gives the illusion of a conclusion and cuts to black before it has to answer for how many more questions have been raised.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    As for that central question: Yep, it’s art, all right. One only wishes they’d gotten down to the business of it sooner.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s worth a watch to see these two reliably comic actors do some heavy dramatic lifting and tenderly spot for each other.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Capitalizes on the audience’s familiarity with the many players and their complex backstories, but never advances the ball down the field, tenders no new thought or wrinkle to the franchise. It’s the difference between a diverting entertainment, and a riveting one.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Understandably, a filmmaker tackling the retelling of a national hero must do so with great delicacy, but The Sea Inside presents not so much a hero as a saint in Sampredo.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Nolan’s end-act pacing has always felt ponderous – but it’s not enough to ruin what is surely the most intellectually and viscerally engaging action film in years. The soul doesn’t stir, no, but everything else is wildly somersaulting.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Serenity evinces the kind of swashbuckling bonhomie that made so many of us fall in love with the original "Star Wars" films, a love that was mightily tested by George Lucas' humorless prequels.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Like a kindler, gentler "Bully," Mean Creek hinges on the bullied fighting back against the aggressor, but offers a more expansive examination of aggression and, even more significantly, passivity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Winnie the Pooh doesn't reinvent the wheel, just gives it an affectionate spin, and that is no more and no less than what one would hope from a family reunion.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Frozen can count in its favor visual grandeur, two energetic young women as co-leads, and a couple of plot twists that place the film a cut above your average princess fare.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There are good guys we don't care much about and bad guys that we do and even badder guys we're supposed to hate. But on the sliding scale of culpability, everybody's just a few clicks away from the next guy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Throughout, the documentary is fun and engaging, even whimsical when using (to good effect) illustrations and Gilliam’s own storyboards.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Burrus has a face that does all the talking for him -- deep creases, sad eyes, and a gray hue that hangs over him like a rain cloud. It's a remarkable performance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There’s gore, all right, although the real terror lies in the tease, and the often dark, herky-jerky DV format ratchets up the tension to an almost unbearable degree.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There’s an undeniable thrill to watching something so experimental and yet totally accessible to those of us who speak only layman’s Dylanese, and it’s Haynes’ warmest film yet.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's the tortoise and the hare, Nepalese-style, and it's surprisingly dramatic.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All herky-jerky camera movements and no pussyfooting around with the interior lives of these characters.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Forget divining who’s predator and who’s prey. Everybody’s chum here.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Cornish, in her first film seen stateside, is astonishing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Leaves you scratching your head a bit, wondering what just happened, and worrying if maybe it could happen to you too.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    First, to dispel the two talking points attending The Impossible, Juan Antonio Bayona's dramatization of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami: No, it's not racist, and no, you don't have to be a parent to feel the film in your bones.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Although Super Size Me benefits from a number of interviews with nutritionists, lobbyists, lawyers, and the like, the film inevitably (but not unenjoyably) is dominated by Spurlock, who offers his sober-minded statistics and cheeky asides without ever devolving into an off-putting Michael Moore-like moralizing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Director Roger Michell and his frequent writer Hanif Kureishi (their last film together was Venus) regularly dance to the very cliff’s edge of despair, and only for the grace of good casting do you not wish they’d just jump and get it over with.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A rare achievement.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Linklater has crafted an always genial and at times even joyful period charmer about that moment on the cusp: before a boy becomes a man and another man becomes a mythological figure.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The Hangover instantly has the feel of one for the ages.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A Girl Cut in Two is Hitchcock sans the whodunit, essentially a long preamble of seduction and spiritual ruin, capped by a crime everyone saw coming (and an eye-dazzling coda that twists the title from metaphor to … something else).
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    When The Company owns up to what it is -– a performance piece -– it’s glorious. Everything else -– the window-dressing of a fiction film -– just gums up that gloriousness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Isn't quite a home run: The visually flat film leans on a pop culture crutch that probably won't age very well, and the finale – while terrifically funny – feels piped in from another, far sillier movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It is certainly competent, lovely to look at, but leaves little lasting impression.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's all so goddamn realistic and reminiscent of real-life love (and how often does that happen onscreen?) that The Puffy Chair would be hell to watch if it weren't so funny.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The U.S. cut, which Wong endorses, runs a slim 108 minutes, and has by all accounts been reshaped for American audiences, who, by and large, don’t have the same foreknowledge of Ip Man, or martial arts, as Asian audiences do.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's a dirty, ugly, joyless world these fathers and sons live in, and for all the passion involved, of retribution and a father's fierce love, Perdition is as emotionally distant as Sullivan. The feelings are all there, just submerged.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film holds its twists too close to the chest, and there's little to chew on till the ambitiousness of its plotting is revealed late in the film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect it's that spirit as much as the injustice of her incarceration that drew so many people to her cause and inspired this labor-of-love documentary about her journey to hell and back.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In the House, from the eclectic French filmmaker François Ozon (Under the Sand, 8 Women), is an almost perverse delight, an egghead thriller that slyly shell-games its truer purpose as an inquiry into the construction – and deconstruction – of fiction. Scratch deconstruction: Make that tear-the-house-down demolition.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Starts out as a lark, but veers into grittier, more emotionally complex territory -- just like a real relationship -- that the film doesn't have the chops to sustain.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Taking a cue from the horse in question, Ross’ film takes its time getting into the race, but once it gets going, the going gets good.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    This first release from Disney’s self-explanatory new arm, Disneynature, is at the very least peripherally concerned with the planet and its dwindling prospects, but the real renewable resource here is the groundbreaking "Planet Earth" miniseries.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Hair is personal. It's also political.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Smart, uncanny, resistant to the short cuts of pop psychology, and shocking in the best since of the word, Steers' debut is a stunner.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Screenwriters Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman, and fanboys’ favorite whipping boy, Damon Lindelof, keep the film moving at a quippy clip; there’s really no fat here until the film feints a climax only to lurch the coaster-car back up the hill again.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mostly it's just terribly funny and sad and beautifully acted and terrifically feel-good for being, you know, a cancer comedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A surprisingly warmhearted examination of hypocrisy and social insecurity, unlikely camaraderie and stutter-stepped formation of adult identity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A certain inevitability hangs over The Mother – as if any of this could end well – but if Kureishi's framework is perhaps predictable, his knotty, complex characters are not.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's a wealth of material at odds with a scant running time and shallow focus.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The magnificence of the film's pieces does not quite add up to a satisfying whole.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Equally harrowing and heartrending, Shame is a film that feels akin to going into battle, and I for one didn't emerge unscathed.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    But by the time this imperfect little film wends its way to one of the most winning exit lines I've heard in a long time, it's turned into something, well, perfectly lovely.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It doesn't have the bite to be satire, the pratfalls to be broad comedy, or the wit to pass as a comedy of manners. What does that leave? The French cinematic equivalent of motivational coaching, and -- just like Pignon -- something spectacularly unspectacular.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Pray maintains a steadfastly objective viewpoint, and it's a testament to his film's success that it can accommodate the audience's inevitably shifting allegiances from one family member to the next.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's impossible to shake the feeling that these are merely actors -- albeit good ones.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ambrose owns this crawlspace between being fierce and being fragile. But she can't escape the fact that her role is underwritten; the script suffers from an excess of subtlety.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    If you shy away from that sick feeling in the pit of the stomach that comes when watching good people make bad decisions, then best to steer clear of Manito, a low-budget indie that reaches near-Greek proportions of tragedy brought on by lousy decision-making.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a movie made of moments, the antithesis of "plot-driven," but the sum of these moments is magnificent, the culmination of so many elements: acting, scripting, score (by locals Michael Linnen and David Wingo), and cinematography.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This modest French-language film follows the time-honored cinematic tradition of plot as spearheaded by a simple twist of fate.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The former mayor is an alert onscreen presence, but the film surrounding him is not always so lively.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    And yet that is what is so very remarkable about the film: In a slim 72 minutes, it heart-tethers us to these teenagers, paying tribute to their unique and private selves while allowing the audience to see its own reflection in them.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Refn’s artful and energetic film never goes further than face value.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Sleepwalk With Me is never anything less than awfully likable. But I so wanted it to be more.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I don't want to oversell the thing. It is, quite simply, something very special indeed.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The film is studded with stirring moments of surprise.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Frankly, I'm shocked that Disney, frequent purveyor of sleeping beauties and singing animated animals, is the studio behind this wonderfully black comedy/morality tale for children, but maybe Disney, too, saw past the material's deliciously macabre bent to find also a thrilling little essay on friendship, fate, and the restorative powers of onions.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There's no question that the actors and filmmakers have fashioned a compelling (if unformed) love story of a certain age – which is not to be confused for a love story for the ages.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Much has been made of the fact that Swanberg has cast for the first time bona fide movie stars and not just his mumblecore pals: In fact, it's the making of the movie. If you're going to build an entire film on microexpressions, then a certain innate magnetism is required. Swanberg gets it in spades from his top-shelf cast.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    So much here is equally befuddling and beguiling; I caught myself leaning in toward the screen repeatedly, trying to somehow get closer to the gorgeous impenetrability of the story, of the boy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    With a saga this sprawling and byzantine, it makes sense that the emphasis is not on Schiele, but rather on what the sorely wronged Bondi never stopped calling "my Schiele."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Something is terribly amiss when the American actors sound like English is their second language.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Cotillard doesn't look part Native American or sound like a Thirties Chicago moll, but damned if she isn't a sight and sound to behold. Whatever her technical limitations, she rises above them to breathe a flesh, blood, and battered verisimilitude into the part. You can't tear your eyes off her, any more than you can Mann's flawed but still engrossing picture.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Everything that was sharp in the original text has been rounded and buffed.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    With so many soldiers interviewed, some only fleetingly, it's impossible to keep track of them all.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A devastating and weighty picture.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ultimately Hedges’ film, like the turkey, comes out underdone.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    No doubt about it: Bad Santa is blasphemous. But, to borrow a phrase from another famous hedonist, Homer Simpson, it’s also sacrilicious.