Kimberley Jones
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For 671 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Before Night Falls
Lowest review score: 0 Zookeeper
Score distribution:
671 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Perfectly passable film.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The characters in The Claim suffer under the weight of very big things -- betrayal, abandonment, disease, death -- but they do so quietly, stoically, until, by God, they just can't take it anymore.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A nice-looking, nice-feeling exercise in conventionalism that sure could use a couple of transvestites and maybe a house falling from the sky.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Carrey is a bit of a conundrum: He's the best and worst thing about Lemony Snicket.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Dreamers is infused with the same kind of wistful melancholy that made the French New Wave films so winning, and it’s all gorgeous to look at.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    While Saved! initially gets in some good gags at the expense of religious hypocrisy, it eases off, opting not to skewer religion but rather to poke it gently with a stick to see what happens.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Stoller and Segel don't shy away from rational, relatable adults, which may be an unsexy selling point for a romantic comedy, but that attention to authenticity elevates the likable, low-stakes The Five-Year Engagement.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It’s the funniest, friskiest date movie in a good long while.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Help may be more interested in the moral at the end of the story than the story itself, but what saves the film from its meticulous one-dimensionality is that nuanced, deeply moving cast.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Counselors and campers' moms tend to tear up when they talk about the lessons these girls are learning, lessons that go way beyond how to tune a bass, but this isn't exactly a "rah-rah" film.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    What is so surprising – even exhilarating – about The Names of Love is that it shucks off the desultory roadblocks that engine the modern romantic comedy – all that razzmatazz of missed connections and dunderheaded misunderstandings.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Funny, bewildering, giddy spectacle.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Movingly captures the terrors and delights of being lovesick at 17. Would that it hadn't felt constrained to target only the 17-year-olds.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Big Miracle is all formula, but with just enough savvy to temper the gentle-spiritedness and qualify it as that rare family film with an emotional manipulativeness that doesn't leave a sick slick in the mouth.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    You can easily lose five minutes making sense of it - and another 10 poking holes in it - but what of it? The preceding 100 minutes pass so pleasurably, the few false moves barely register - maybe the biggest con of all, but consider me happily snowed.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Maybe someday there will be a better commercial comedy about a girl taking charge of her sexual education, but for now, this is the only one we’ve got, and it’s a filthy-fun charmer.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A grinning but toothless comedy, this Christmas-themed outing pales in inventiveness compared to the original, which brought sweet, silly anarchy to its one-thing-leads-to-another plotting.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The script also takes the occasional dip into hokeyness, but even that is buoyed by its ballsy leading ladies.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Authenticity is strangely lacking in Laurel Canyon, although Cholodenko’s exquisite eye for framing remains uncorrupted. Laurel Canyon is often visually captivating.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There is a plot – a pretty clunky one, jerry-rigged with character motivations that amount to one long “huh?” and dialogue that might as well have been chunked out of a cliche generator – but who needs plot when we can have mayhem?
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The script is chockablock with al dente amusements – obvious targets still make for wickedly funny one-liners – and the German actor Waltz (Inglourious Basterds) is terrific as the only parent unburdened by decorum.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect a second viewing would uncover more information embedded in the mise-en-scène; had Trance – tonally a jumble and disorienting to the point of distraction – rewarded the audience with the pure perfection of a Keyser Söze-like reveal, I’d be more inclined to make the return trip.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    And yet, it works, so much so that after two and a quarter hours, I was startled – and not a little disappointed – when the closing credits kicked in.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Funny People – sensitive, shaggy, a little bit draggy – is as much about the maturation of Ira as a performer and George as a man as it is about Apatow’s maturation as an artist.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This is Jackman’s show entirely, and he’s as forceful and charismatic as ever as the walking, talking hurt that is Wolverine. If only he had something more interesting to do here.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Duplass brothers have an exceptional eye for microexpressions (yes, they're still zoom-happy), and there's something to be admired in this new interest in a macro lens on the universe's workings. If only it didn't take wading through so much drear to get to that divine.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In all his misguided enthusiasm, Parker has mustered enough bluster to fill up a zeppelin, blowing harder and harder, for something more and more fanciful. But with so much hot air, the bubble is bound to burst, and so it does in Parker's blundering adaptation.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    More often than not The Heat is just stupid-funny, which circles us back to McCarthy, motor-mouthing four-letter fury like an operatic aria. She sells Mullins as delightfully unhinged and fairly radiating with rage, and it’s irresistible.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Has a heart bursting with good intentions, something that goes a long way in dimming from memory its inherent routineness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Three actors play Bobby at different ages, and none of them quite jibe with the other – 16-year-old Bobby seems far savvier than the twenty-something version (who is played by a defanged Colin Farrell).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    High spirits mark the first half of the film; quite simply, these guys are just fun to be around – most especially Howard, all half-lidded, cat-who-got-the-cream coolness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    To a one, they nail the humor, all right, but they also, quite crucially, humanize the high concept.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A clever idea that never stretches beyond just that -- a caterpillar that never blooms into a butterfly.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The spirit of the thing – the way it champions intellectual curiosity and critical thinking – warmed this nerd’s heart tremendously.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Screenwriters Andy Paterson and Frank Cottrell Boyce (who wrote many of Michael Winterbottom’s early films) adeptly shift the action back and forth between these two timelines, and the drama – exterior and interior – is engrossing in both tracks.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    With "50/50," his last stint in the director's chair, Levine upended convention to make a feel-good cancer movie. He's still defying expectations: In animating the inner workings of the undead, he's made a movie that is both clever and heartfelt.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    An admirable effort, but too many words, words, and more words, and not enough of the ache of that half-smile.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all boils down to trying too hard, when everybody knows a good grift is one that appears effortless.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Somewhere in that chirpy half-pint frame dwell some meaty comic chops. Goldie Hawn may have found her successor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    If LaBute wants to plumb the depths of human unkindness, have at it -– only dig deeper next time.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    LaBeouf plays Jacob as no naif – he can be as slippery and savage as the next suit – but there's also real tenderness in his scenes with Mulligan and Langella (in a small but significant role as Jacob's mentor).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Terrio's technically proficient film is mature, modern, and minus the all-important passion and risk.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There’s a surprising – and truthful – melancholic undercurrent to Definitely, Maybe – the one commonality between the three women is the heartbreak they induce – but Brooks undermines that truthfulness with a dogmatic insistence upon romantic mythologizing. No maybes about it: The reality is far darker, and more interesting.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Occasional animated inserts inspired by Chantry’s work as an illustrator, while accomplished, inject an off-note of whimsy that doesn’t quite square with the script’s stabs at edgier humor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Does Apatow understand his heroes are assholes?
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Terribly tender, good-hearted picture.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    After a sparky first half greatly aided by Kristin Scott Thomas' devilish turn as an unsentimental press secretary, Salmon Fishing grows soggier. It's such a pretty, witty gloss of a picture, it hardly knows what to do with real-world terror, hence the Snidely Whiplash-like limning of Muslim extremists.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Once the film gets cooking, the questions never stop. For instance: When you find the dead body of someone you love, isn’t your first call to the cops?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    With all its emphasis on beat, Brown Sugar can't maintain a steady one, yet when it finds it, the film surely soars.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Much of the original film's geniality – and all of its pro-environment stumping – has gone missing; what we have instead is a watered-down likeness that curiously turns disaster flick in its too-scary third act.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The landscape and the lovers are pretty to look at, but two households divided should really pack more of a punch.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The supposedly epic battle the entire film builds toward – the single action set-piece – is a ho-hummer. Fire and ice, turns out, was an oversell: Think tepid tap water instead.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The terrific ensemble acting and Troche’s genuine, nonjudgmental interest in exploring the weird places wounded people go, both internally and externally, amount to an insulated but moving portrait of the real nuclear family.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Brothers is too depthless to dredge up any tears.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Somm doesn’t try to write the book on wine connoisseurship, but it does give good CliffsNotes.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Glory Road really isn't a bad show – it's just an obvious one – and one wishes material of this historical import had received a more refined rendering.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Mostly this is a tense, portentous, and provocative piece.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    If anything, The Invention of Lying is too soft for the satirical promise of its premise.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Berger’s low-key, likable ensemble film flares with brilliance in its framing concept.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a little bit silly – as is Dafoe’s Kentucky-fried cowboy mechanic named Elvis – but silly is fun. In fact, one wishes it were sillier still.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Paul is offensive solely for being so underachieving.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The ideas are there, hints of genius, but no one ignites them. Add Osmosis Jones to that list of universal enigmas, and, more specifically, how the Farrelly Brothers could have done so little with so much.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The climax, like the film itself, is big, loud, and looks cool enough, which is what we’ve come to expect from summer movies … but not from Robert Rodriguez.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Happy Endings is unabashedly sentimental (cheekily couched in a black-comic guise), with Roos acting as a sort of benevolent god over his characters.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The darker stuff begs to be handled less delicately than this dance, and in that respect the director stumbles.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    By film's end, you'll wish they tossed Allen in the rainforest and left him for the leopards to snack on.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Forget life lessons: I much prefer a lemur king doing the robot.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    But most damningly, Shut Up Little Man! fails to convey what was so hypnotic about the original tapes, and Bate's decision to re-enact the transcripts with actors seems weirdly contrary to the spirit of the thing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Ambitious, brutish, ruthlessly unromantic – has the right idea casting its heroine as a Joan of Arc-type crusader and its evil queen a dissertation (albeit first draft) on beauty as the most direct path to power for the disenfranchised female.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Morning Glory had the capacity to be a smarter, tarter picture, though it's not bad as is: well-acted and ingratiating, with at least one howlingly funny sequence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    Branagh might as well have opened a can and dumped it on a plate, the ridges of a factory-line production still perfectly hatched on a gelatinous cylinder of crud.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    We have pretty much all the information we need within the first half-hour, which undercuts the supposedly climactic reveal of the contents of Maruge's letter and renders the torturous flashbacks unnecessary for narrative purposes. And not a little bit sadomasochistic, too – an ill fit for a PG-13 family film.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The filmmakers have cast their underdogs well: Madhur Mittal plays the anxious, upright Dinesh; Suraj Sharma is the loose-limbed, pizza-loving Rinku; and they’re both funny and endearing, two words that apply to the whole of the supporting cast.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There are just too many damn characters, with the best ones taking a backseat to the dullish love quadrangle.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    This is the kind of movie in which every other line of dialogue feels like a metaphor – and from there on, the film seesaws between the uncomfortable extremes of glum and twee: an overwrought dirge keyed to a xylophonic ping.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    You can’t read one of Clooney’s endless People profiles without hearing the Cary Grant comparison, but here, he’s all Gable – same rakishness and stubble and tanned-leather basso profundo.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This is no more (but no less?) than what we have rather oddly come to expect from Neeson in his late period (Taken, The A-Team).
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Refreshingly anti-princess and sweet without degrading into sugary, Ramona and Beezus animates Ramona's frequent flights of fancy with DIY-like sequences that literalize, quite charmingly, how a kid colors the world.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This Native American romantic comedy, which won the Audience Award at the 2001 Austin Film Festival, arrives in theatres four years late but seasonally right on time.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Some of The Anniversary Party's titillation factor rests on the awareness that these are actors playing actors, in roles written specifically for them that at times appear awfully close to home.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The misfits, as ever, must take a back seat to the morality, and the result – while in no way migraine-inducing – traffics in rote truisms.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Snyder has cast Man of Steel with dramatic actors, not action stars, and it pays off.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    While its heart is always in the right place, the humor – especially in the sludgy first act – is hit or miss.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Never achieves the satisfaction of a real crackerjack con movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Never thrills on an emotional level the way the best of sports films – a "Hoosiers," say – can, but it's a satisfying entertainment nonetheless.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This latest offering continues a trend toward increasingly mature moviemaking from the actor/writer/director.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    As an experiment in mood, as a love song to Paris and to the French New Wave, as a fun, flirty little number, Charlie provides a giddy satisfaction.
    • Austin Chronicle
    • 55 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The movie moves episodically, leisurely, through roughly a decade, and that feels like a gift: to nestle in with these extraordinary, ordinary people and get to know them.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Uneven, ineffective mash-up of sex comedy and artillery-heavy action.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Hundred-Foot Journey is elevated comfort food. The flavors aren’t complex, but it’s nourishing nonetheless.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A spirited and eye-popping stealth charmer.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Mercifully, the frosted icing-icky title bears little relation to the film's actual content.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I suppose when you make a movie, however tangentially, about Viagra, you're required to insert at least one scene of its side effects, but the broadness with which Zwick plays it out is like a stake to the heart of the film's hard-earned but fast-lost authenticity.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Frustrations abound with this limited film, but Wild Horse, Wild Ride does one thing exceptionally well, and that is convey the emotional bond between trainer and horse.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As the songs pile up and the plot putters along, Romance & Cigarettes wears thin, like a moral for the titular addiction: Sure, there’s the sweet dream of that first drag, but a whole pack’ll do a body bad.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Liberal Arts is not unlikable: There are some intelligent observations about how humans woo, and the film is so suffused with sincerity you want to give it a pat on the head just for trying so hard.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Luhrmann has always had a knack with the fever of passion, but here he only catches high fever’s empty gibberish.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Phillips and co-writer Scot Armstrong waste too much time on a silly love-interest subplot for Wilson; that time is much better served by the frat-boy idiocies, like Frank beer-bonging himself into streaking.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There is Clooney’s deceptively layered performance, some startling bits of laugh-out-loud absurdity, and the not-at-all-negligible pleasure to be had in a cockeyed point of view.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ambling, just-passable picture.