Kimberley Jones

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For 769 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Before Night Falls
Lowest review score: 0 A Haunted House
Score distribution:
769 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s not like Monsters University is a bad movie. It’s just not a terribly interesting one.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Feels like a Fincher film: It possesses the same smarts, the same visual panache, the same violence. But not the same heart.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Medem's film is a bleached-out beauty, hitting our most commanding human emotions -- lust to love to grief to rage and back again -- while only occasionally striking a wrong chord.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This is a quest movie, with a lot of ground covered, and just as our heroes never stay long in one place or feel safe in their surroundings, neither does the audience.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Way never arrives anywhere you couldn't see coming a mile away, but it does so with such empathy that its conclusions feel comforting rather than overly predictable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a shrewd last move in a movie that’s uncommonly smart about when to buck convention and when to conform to the warm feels we all want.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Teenage is an art film – an engrossing one at that – so it isn’t required to respect Queensberry rules vis-à-vis documentaries.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There isn’t a false step from the quietly devastating Farahani; her tour-de-force performance carries the film through its rocky stretches.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The material is interesting, and the production values are top-notch. Anushia Nieradzik deserves special notice for her costume design; her luxurious dresses in deep shades of purple and magenta race the pulse more than anything particular in the plot or characterization. It’s all quite well done, if only a touch too decorous.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Bardem injects a shaggy, compassionate humor throughout, aided by a wry and moving ensemble cast and co-writer/director Fernando León de Aranda's eye for the offbeat.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    You don't just root for Harold and Kumar to get the girl, get the weed, and, above all, get the burger – you want to hang out with them while they' doing it, and see if they'e free next Friday night, too.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Warmed my heart about as much as the cold cream Angèle slathers all over her wrinkling clients.
    • Austin Chronicle
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In manipulating its many disparate characters to bump into each other and set plot lines in motion, Intermission walks a fine line between clever and contrived, with the scale tipping more often toward contrived.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The film, a distinctly secular take on Waugh's religiosity, is far more interested in the battle of blind faith vs. rigid unbelief and its devastating effects. Herein, everyone is complicated – by their station, their philosophy, their God – and everyone is complicit.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    All told, The Young Victoria is a very well-made if not especially memorable picture, moving with all the grace and steadfastness of a waltz Victoria and Albert share, but absent any urgency or anything particularly exclamatory.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    For a film about looking for a sign, looking for solace, Room quite brazenly offers neither. It isn't an easy film, but the world's already got plenty of easy and easily digestible films.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The movie lumbers on some more, reiterating the obvious and relying on overfamiliar imagery. Audiences have a long year to wait for Part 2. Would it not have been better to leave them breathless than heaving a sigh?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It neither embarrasses the original, nor is superior to it in any way.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A film that is at once elegant and sublimely silly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    A stiff drink or maybe some pharmaceutical assistance might have made me overlook the film's sour tone, or the unremarkableness of its direction.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The film stumbles a bit in its third act, when war kills the good times for good.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Manages the neat feat of feeling sweetly inevitable rather than boilerplate predictable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A staggering document of the lengths parents will go to for the sake of their child.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The movie can be funny in fits, but too often the scripters go for the obvious and uninspired.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 11 Kimberley Jones
    It's all infuriatingly simplistic, and the performances help matters little. Quinn and McTeer are wholly uncompelling.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Good, clean fun, with none of the icky aftertaste so common to “family friendly” ware, Drumline proves irresistible in more ways than one.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Has very little soul to speak of, but it's got swagger to burn.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    I’m all for ambiguity, but Dear Frankie’s multiple dangling threads indicate incoherent storytelling, not profundity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    This kind of a dance film lives and dies by the routines, and this one wins: Mixing elements of gymnastics, karate, and break with the almighty step – an exceedingly polite term for what is really an awesome stomp.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There's no denying the dazzling effect, but a fireworks sequence midfilm only underscores the sad fact that there's no lasting illumination here, only the fast-burn spitzing of bang snaps.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    They don't make women, sexy but regal, like Pfeiffer much anymore, and Cheri is quite a monument to her.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The middle of a movie is often where filmmakers lose their way, but Friends With Benefits nails this stretch, in which nothing very remarkable happens as two people talk, in bed and out of bed. There's a fine line between fun-dirty and ick-dirty – sometimes you can't identify the line until it's been crossed – and this film keeps its toes on the right side of raunch.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Boden and Fleck's unabashedly warmhearted film is a sensitively wrought but also very funny portrait of the way we respond to pressure.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    When Les Misérables is good, it is very, very good, and when it is bad, it's usually because Russell Crowe has opened his mouth.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What we get is more of the same from Ferrell – funny faces, goofy accents, pratfalls aplenty – and that ain't bad. It just could have been a lot better.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Bruckheimer -– always eager to egg on the public’s thirst for bigger, louder, stupider –- has done a scandalous amount of damage to contemporary cinema, but for once, his dubious talent for big-buck bombast is exploited for good rather than evil.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    If you ever thought "Footloose" might’ve been improved with an Irish brogue and a short pour of agitprop, then by all means look to this latest from Ken Loach, Britain’s elder statesman of cinema and its evergreen champion of the working class.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Wright is terrific – sensitive and alert – in the live-action opening. But that opening runs more than 45 minutes long, a way too heavy-handed preamble to the crazed animation to come, and the actress’ vocal delivery – soft-spoken, gently bewildered – is too soporific to pull off lines like, “Look at me, I’m your prophet of doom.”
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Penn's Bicke is often so pitiable it's hard not to want to look away – but what else to expect from perhaps our most compulsively watchable contemporary actor?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Columbus never quite captures the depth, the rich complexities of Rowling's novels. She's written four Harry Potter books for kids that adults swoon for, too. Columbus has made two Harry Potter movies for kids … and we'll leave it at that. That isn't bad. But I suspect there's something better just around the bend.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Did I fall in love with Undertow? Not in the least. But I liked it alright, and amidst the mediocrity, even rot, that constitutes 98% of contemporary American movies, that'll do fine.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Yes, this is the stuff of fiction, where individuals can drift in and out of another's life and make extraordinary, unbelievable things happen.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Falling in love with the wrong person makes for a far more toothsome melodrama, a fact this small, satisfying picture rightly recognizes.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Echotone is scattered, for sure (the sound ordinance battle is poorly handled), but as an anecdotal account of Austin in the first decade of a new century, it's rarely anything less than compelling.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Kit Kittredge is a dutiful bore. Still, I couldn't help but wonder if, in the face of all-out market collapse, it might serve a dual purpose as primer for kiddies on economic depression – because food stamps always taste better with a side order of spunk. Or is it pluck?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Megamind gets existential, but only in blips, and while it is never anything less than vibrant and exceedingly clever, it is also a rather slight thing for such mega-sized proportions.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s an enjoyable enough exercise in teen angst triumphing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Everybody likes to watch the messy guts-stuff of other peoples' lives, if only because we know then we're not alone in our weird ways.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a curiously inert, workmanlike production: a whole lot of pomp and incircumstance.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The latest installment in the Austin Powers series has stopped making much sense at all, but it sure gets its giggle on, and good.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Marshmallow nation, you may now exhale: Rob Thomas did ya right.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Still, when The Yellow Handkerchief finally hooks into the meat of Hamill’s source story, the narrative tension puts enough wind in the film’s sails to arrive at its corny but sentimentally satisfying conclusion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Perfectly passable film.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A nice-looking, nice-feeling exercise in conventionalism that sure could use a couple of transvestites and maybe a house falling from the sky.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The characters in The Claim suffer under the weight of very big things -- betrayal, abandonment, disease, death -- but they do so quietly, stoically, until, by God, they just can't take it anymore.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Carrey is a bit of a conundrum: He's the best and worst thing about Lemony Snicket.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    While Saved! initially gets in some good gags at the expense of religious hypocrisy, it eases off, opting not to skewer religion but rather to poke it gently with a stick to see what happens.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Dreamers is infused with the same kind of wistful melancholy that made the French New Wave films so winning, and it’s all gorgeous to look at.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Stoller and Segel don't shy away from rational, relatable adults, which may be an unsexy selling point for a romantic comedy, but that attention to authenticity elevates the likable, low-stakes The Five-Year Engagement.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It’s the funniest, friskiest date movie in a good long while.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Help may be more interested in the moral at the end of the story than the story itself, but what saves the film from its meticulous one-dimensionality is that nuanced, deeply moving cast.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Counselors and campers' moms tend to tear up when they talk about the lessons these girls are learning, lessons that go way beyond how to tune a bass, but this isn't exactly a "rah-rah" film.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    What is so surprising – even exhilarating – about The Names of Love is that it shucks off the desultory roadblocks that engine the modern romantic comedy – all that razzmatazz of missed connections and dunderheaded misunderstandings.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Funny, bewildering, giddy spectacle.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A manic, lithesome thing, 2 Days in New York flexes between broad comedy and a beautifully observed portrait of family life – especially life after death.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    As much a portrait of a community as of its brilliant, de facto mayor, Harmontown is a stirring tribute to the restorative power of finding your people.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Movingly captures the terrors and delights of being lovesick at 17. Would that it hadn't felt constrained to target only the 17-year-olds.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Big Miracle is all formula, but with just enough savvy to temper the gentle-spiritedness and qualify it as that rare family film with an emotional manipulativeness that doesn't leave a sick slick in the mouth.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    You can easily lose five minutes making sense of it - and another 10 poking holes in it - but what of it? The preceding 100 minutes pass so pleasurably, the few false moves barely register - maybe the biggest con of all, but consider me happily snowed.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Maybe someday there will be a better commercial comedy about a girl taking charge of her sexual education, but for now, this is the only one we’ve got, and it’s a filthy-fun charmer.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Crafted by much of the same creative team behind the "Despicable Me" franchise, The Secret Life has wit, for sure, but it could use more balls.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A grinning but toothless comedy, this Christmas-themed outing pales in inventiveness compared to the original, which brought sweet, silly anarchy to its one-thing-leads-to-another plotting.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Authenticity is strangely lacking in Laurel Canyon, although Cholodenko’s exquisite eye for framing remains uncorrupted. Laurel Canyon is often visually captivating.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The script also takes the occasional dip into hokeyness, but even that is buoyed by its ballsy leading ladies.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There is a plot – a pretty clunky one, jerry-rigged with character motivations that amount to one long “huh?” and dialogue that might as well have been chunked out of a cliche generator – but who needs plot when we can have mayhem?
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The script is chockablock with al dente amusements – obvious targets still make for wickedly funny one-liners – and the German actor Waltz (Inglourious Basterds) is terrific as the only parent unburdened by decorum.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect a second viewing would uncover more information embedded in the mise-en-scène; had Trance – tonally a jumble and disorienting to the point of distraction – rewarded the audience with the pure perfection of a Keyser Söze-like reveal, I’d be more inclined to make the return trip.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    And yet, it works, so much so that after two and a quarter hours, I was startled – and not a little disappointed – when the closing credits kicked in.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Funny People – sensitive, shaggy, a little bit draggy – is as much about the maturation of Ira as a performer and George as a man as it is about Apatow’s maturation as an artist.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This is Jackman’s show entirely, and he’s as forceful and charismatic as ever as the walking, talking hurt that is Wolverine. If only he had something more interesting to do here.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Magic Mike XXL isn’t really a movie. It’s a bachelorette party, or a book club, or any other safe space where women gather for some of that “you go, girl” good feeling. It’s an amusement-park ride. Fasten the safety belt, secure your purses, and get ready to scream.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The actresses are so quick and so supple, the force of their individual personalities and their irresistible camaraderie hoik the film up from its middling story and scripted jokes. I would have happily stayed in my seat another two hours to continue keeping their company. Just in a better movie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Duplass brothers have an exceptional eye for microexpressions (yes, they're still zoom-happy), and there's something to be admired in this new interest in a macro lens on the universe's workings. If only it didn't take wading through so much drear to get to that divine.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Trumbo certainly has pep. Theodore Shapiro’s jazzy score doesn’t just boast a tom-tom – you could choreograph it with pom-poms. Maybe Roach worried that general audiences wouldn’t cotton to a yellowing story about the Red Menace, so he ginned it up with a jazz-hands idea of midcentury Hollywood, with everyone mugging like it’s a lobby-card photo shoot
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In all his misguided enthusiasm, Parker has mustered enough bluster to fill up a zeppelin, blowing harder and harder, for something more and more fanciful. But with so much hot air, the bubble is bound to burst, and so it does in Parker's blundering adaptation.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    More often than not The Heat is just stupid-funny, which circles us back to McCarthy, motor-mouthing four-letter fury like an operatic aria. She sells Mullins as delightfully unhinged and fairly radiating with rage, and it’s irresistible.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Has a heart bursting with good intentions, something that goes a long way in dimming from memory its inherent routineness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Three actors play Bobby at different ages, and none of them quite jibe with the other – 16-year-old Bobby seems far savvier than the twenty-something version (who is played by a defanged Colin Farrell).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    High spirits mark the first half of the film; quite simply, these guys are just fun to be around – most especially Howard, all half-lidded, cat-who-got-the-cream coolness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    To a one, they nail the humor, all right, but they also, quite crucially, humanize the high concept.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A clever idea that never stretches beyond just that -- a caterpillar that never blooms into a butterfly.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The spirit of the thing – the way it champions intellectual curiosity and critical thinking – warmed this nerd’s heart tremendously.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Screenwriters Andy Paterson and Frank Cottrell Boyce (who wrote many of Michael Winterbottom’s early films) adeptly shift the action back and forth between these two timelines, and the drama – exterior and interior – is engrossing in both tracks.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    With "50/50," his last stint in the director's chair, Levine upended convention to make a feel-good cancer movie. He's still defying expectations: In animating the inner workings of the undead, he's made a movie that is both clever and heartfelt.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Somewhere in that chirpy half-pint frame dwell some meaty comic chops. Goldie Hawn may have found her successor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    An admirable effort, but too many words, words, and more words, and not enough of the ache of that half-smile.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all boils down to trying too hard, when everybody knows a good grift is one that appears effortless.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    If LaBute wants to plumb the depths of human unkindness, have at it -– only dig deeper next time.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    LaBeouf plays Jacob as no naif – he can be as slippery and savage as the next suit – but there's also real tenderness in his scenes with Mulligan and Langella (in a small but significant role as Jacob's mentor).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Terrio's technically proficient film is mature, modern, and minus the all-important passion and risk.

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