Kimberley Jones
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For 706 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Before Night Falls
Lowest review score: 0 Someone Like You...
Score distribution:
706 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    A riot of sight and sound that, however baffling, has an irresistible, elemental pull.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a movie made of moments, the antithesis of "plot-driven," but the sum of these moments is magnificent, the culmination of so many elements: acting, scripting, score (by locals Michael Linnen and David Wingo), and cinematography.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    The film gets its biggest laughs – and there truly are some grandly bleak belly-shakers here – by upsetting the apple cart on traditional gender roles.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    The Grand Budapest Hotel is nothing short of an enchantment.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    It's huge and bewildering and it hurts to watch, but it hurts so good it's gorgeous.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    The film is so soaring, sometimes literally, I hardly missed the feeling of hard ground underfoot.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    Do we ever get the whole truth? Only this: The past is never the past. In Farhadi’s wounding worldview, the past is the present and, most certainly, the future, too.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and touching, Frances Ha may very well be the most eloquent take yet on a generation in flux – a cinematic talk-back to so many Atlantic articles, minus the scolding and the statistics, and uncharacteristically (for Baumbach) uncynical.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s not quite as brutalizing as McEwan’s brilliant source novel – it bears too much of a Great Art buff – but it ravishes nonetheless in its grand exploration of the sins of the daughter and a lifetime spent making reparations.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A Most Violent Year is its own thing, hypnotic and exacting and as subtly savage as mellow-voiced Marvin Gaye’s “Inner City Blues (Makes Me Wanna Holler),” which opens the film and sets the tone. I was fully in thrall to it all.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's a mistake to confuse Zero Dark Thirty for "truth" – that would be a disservice to the high level of craftsmanship, from first-billed actors to below-the-line production crew, at work in this movie fiction – but there is admirably little fat on its bones.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This modest French-language film follows the time-honored cinematic tradition of plot as spearheaded by a simple twist of fate.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Bahrani's small marvel of a film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A rare achievement.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This is a quest movie, with a lot of ground covered, and just as our heroes never stay long in one place or feel safe in their surroundings, neither does the audience.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    God Help the Girl is not so perfectly crafted, but the promise – oh, the promise is irresistible.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In the House, from the eclectic French filmmaker François Ozon (Under the Sand, 8 Women), is an almost perverse delight, an egghead thriller that slyly shell-games its truer purpose as an inquiry into the construction – and deconstruction – of fiction. Scratch deconstruction: Make that tear-the-house-down demolition.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Smart, uncanny, resistant to the short cuts of pop psychology, and shocking in the best since of the word, Steers' debut is a stunner.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Looper makes a full-meal entertainment out of piecemealing genres: It boasts the kicky mental gymnastics that come with time-travel terrain, the relentless rapid heart rate of a crackerjack thriller, and the bursts of extreme violence, buttressed with black humor, of a modern actioner.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Screamingly funny. Like I said, terrific stuff.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The actors, as a powerful and convincing ensemble, are equally understated and just as devastating.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Cue the footage of Cockettes in spangles and glitter, high-kicking and belting out show tunes at the top of their lungs. Damn, it looks grand.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This drama-horror hybrid, set within a New York ballet company, strikes a tone more along the lines of the terrifying hallucinatories of Aronofsky's breakout film, "Requiem for a Dream," revisiting, too, favorite themes of monster mommies and female hysteria.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Anderson and his co-writer Roman Coppola have crafted an elegant and emphatic metaphor for adolescence, that tumultuous province of firsts and lasts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Vuillards, however fractured, know one another's rhythms and rituals, and Desplechin knows just how to convey them in the subtlest of ways.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The tension is enough to make you slightly sick, and the overall mood of the thing is deeply dispiriting, but then, nobody ever said that war isn't hell.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Kazan appears in every scene of The Exploding Girl’s perfectly paced 80 minutes, and you’d miss her if she ducked out for even a moment.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Nothing short of majestic.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's all so goddamn realistic and reminiscent of real-life love (and how often does that happen onscreen?) that The Puffy Chair would be hell to watch if it weren't so funny.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Equally harrowing and heartrending, Shame is a film that feels akin to going into battle, and I for one didn't emerge unscathed.

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