Kimberley Jones

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For 828 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 45 Years
Lowest review score: 0 The Women
Score distribution:
828 movie reviews
    • 25 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    It isn't all the actors' faults, of course. You can't, ahem, turn straw into gold, and straw – dull, brittle, lousy to taste – is entirely what director Mark Rosman and first-time screenwriter Leigh Dunlap deliver.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    And then there's the overacting. And then there's the hamminess of the script. And then there's
    • 54 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    These days, Allen's pictures are more like snuff films, in which the viewer must suffer both gifted actors committing screen hara-kiri and a once-brilliant filmmaker soldiering on with his long, bullheaded decline.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    Screenwriter Dean Georgaris gets a hell of a pass here – the story is canon, and, in terms of emotional wallop, does all the heavy lifting for him – but he still manages to gunk up the works with dialogue that is dull-witted at best and outright howling at its worst.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    The Celestine Prophecy's biggest stumbling block (and there are many to choose from) is that the film's dramatic arc hinges on John's awakening to the prophecy. But spiritual epiphany is tough to convey onscreen.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    If you're gonna hire one of the funniest American comedians working today – Zach Galifianakis – and shove him to the side of the frame, then frankly, you can take what happens in Vegas, keep it in Vegas, and keep the rest of the us out of it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    Overlong, overplotted, and pocked with improbabilities.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    New in Town might have better played on the less demanding stage of, say, a Lifetime made-for-TV movie.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    Love Happens? It depends on your definition of “love.” And “happens.” There isn’t much of either in this predictable, putzy drama.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    Indisputably awful comedy.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    Aggressively unfunny and unromantic, Valentine’s Day’s chief concern appears to have been the corralling of its cast of a thousand stars; it seems far less attention was paid to what to do with that cast once assembled.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    In practice, and played as farce, the characters are one-dimensional cutouts kept at a dogged remove. Their miseries are a bore – maybe to Allen, too, who abruptly ends the film, after so much inaction, when it finally catches some dramatic traction.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    Check the credits: That move is ripped straight from producer Michael Bay's playbook.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    These are boys and girls on their very best behavior, which doesn't sound like any prom you or I remember.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    There are kernels here of a thoughtful and provocative picture, but they never pop – or POP!, for that matter.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    As the film's central focal point, Simpson (who also co-wrote the script) is an awful zero – you could hardly imagine a more uncharismatic lead – and his embarrassing swings at big emotion in the climax prove the final blow to a film already hobbled by mawkishness.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    What goes most wrong is the casting. Every facet of Faris' performance feels off.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    They have some fun playacting at class warriors on the lam – and Seyfriend, it must be said, rocks a killer bob – but it's all just big-budget dress-up in a futurescape that reeks of phoniness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    Bill Condon (Dreamgirls, Chicago, Gods and Monsters) takes over the directing reins for these final two parts; his most noteworthy contribution to the series so far is a terrifyingly staged birth scene that should turn the teen fan base off of sex altogether … which is precisely what this whole dumb, punishing series has been gunning for from the start.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    Mostly, New Year's Eve is appalling stuff, a poorly constructed, sentimental sham. Auld lang suck.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    There is running, hiding, fighting, shooting, bleeding, biting, slicing, dicing, and damnably little entertainment value in any of it.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    I have never doodled during a movie before in my life, but holy hell, Parker's two-hour running time takes a lifetime. Plenty of time for mental doodling, too.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    What a clunker.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    Branagh might as well have opened a can and dumped it on a plate, the ridges of a factory-line production still perfectly hatched on a gelatinous cylinder of crud.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    Not just narratively crude but aesthetically ugly, Men, Women & Children’s framing occasionally cuts characters off at the forehead, in effect lobotomizing them. I couldn’t think of a better metaphor for this brainless splotch of self-important scaremongering.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    Most Americans will be unfamiliar with the late British writer Kyril Bonfiglioli’s Mortdecai novels, on which this Johnny Depp comedy is based; still, no reference point is required to come to the conclusion this is a rotten movie all around.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    An adaptation of Kody Keplinger’s YA novel, The DUFF is exponentially dumb.
    • 10 Metascore
    • 11 Kimberley Jones
    I was consistently aghast at how unabashedly alpha-male, heartless, and chauvinistic this film is.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 11 Kimberley Jones
    Instantly forgettable.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 11 Kimberley Jones
    The script's tone veers chaotically -- and ambitiously -- at once aiming for a Noel Coward kind of elegant sparring, then for the lightly raunchy, rompy absurdism of "What's New, Pussycat?"

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