Kimberley Jones

Select another critic »
For 723 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 2046
Lowest review score: 0 The Virginity Hit
Score distribution:
723 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Sugar is a curiosity – too somber for a picaresque, too arm's-length for much emotional effect – and while it's interesting, it's never truly absorbing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There are no hard answers in Room 237, a feature-length, sporadically engaging exploration of the latter (The Shining).
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The very best animation can excite the senses and inflame the imagination. But Chico & Rito's charmless line drawings just made me wish the film was live-action instead.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The elements are all here for something spectacular – and in brilliant bursts, Jeunet really gets it – but in the end, all that potential is sunk by a terminally confused tone and milquetoast pairing of lovers. Pity that.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    In his short career (The Station Agent, The Visitor), McCarthy has established himself as a craftsman of conventionally quirky pictures that are ENTIRELY about ingratiating themselves with the audience.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The camera may dive deep, but the content skims mere surface.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The filmmakers no doubt had a hell of a time whittling the material down; unfortunately, what they came up with was something long on the mundaneness of GovWorks.com and short on the personalities behind it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s worth a watch to see these two reliably comic actors do some heavy dramatic lifting and tenderly spot for each other.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Morris has found a real character in McKinney, but to what end, I couldn't say.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Frozen can count in its favor visual grandeur, two energetic young women as co-leads, and a couple of plot twists that place the film a cut above your average princess fare.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    When The Company owns up to what it is -– a performance piece -– it’s glorious. Everything else -– the window-dressing of a fiction film -– just gums up that gloriousness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film holds its twists too close to the chest, and there's little to chew on till the ambitiousness of its plotting is revealed late in the film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Starts out as a lark, but veers into grittier, more emotionally complex territory -- just like a real relationship -- that the film doesn't have the chops to sustain.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A certain inevitability hangs over The Mother – as if any of this could end well – but if Kureishi's framework is perhaps predictable, his knotty, complex characters are not.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It doesn't have the bite to be satire, the pratfalls to be broad comedy, or the wit to pass as a comedy of manners. What does that leave? The French cinematic equivalent of motivational coaching, and -- just like Pignon -- something spectacularly unspectacular.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's impossible to shake the feeling that these are merely actors -- albeit good ones.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ambrose owns this crawlspace between being fierce and being fragile. But she can't escape the fact that her role is underwritten; the script suffers from an excess of subtlety.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    If you shy away from that sick feeling in the pit of the stomach that comes when watching good people make bad decisions, then best to steer clear of Manito, a low-budget indie that reaches near-Greek proportions of tragedy brought on by lousy decision-making.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Something is terribly amiss when the American actors sound like English is their second language.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Everything that was sharp in the original text has been rounded and buffed.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ultimately Hedges’ film, like the turkey, comes out underdone.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Gilroy zings the film with tantalizing bits of absurdity (one wonders, wistfully, what the Coen brothers would have done with this material), but too often he returns to his darker, more ponderous instincts.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Digging for Fire fails its title’s own promise: It has the capacity for startling insight and artistry, but mostly it’s just a toe listlessly pushing dirt around.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Perhaps there was some confusion – should we play this as a lark or a lesson in geopolitical unrest? – or maybe there was some studio involvement to defang the politics; whatever the case, the noncommittal Charlie Wilson's War treads a good-natured but yawning in-between.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's nothing that feels like real rage, nothing that even remotely approximates the spiritual decimation of a termination.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    When the action shifts to Bill’s childhood home – an islet along the Thames, downriver from the legendary Shepperton Studios – some of the magic of that place rubs off on Boorman’s picture: It becomes lighter on its feet, moves with the breath of life and not just the strength of memory.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Amusing enough, but weirdly joyless.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As is, it's simply too much information crammed too haphazardly into a running time that at times borders on interminable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's unclear if Van Sant intends to inspire guilt; here, as elsewhere, he is exasperatingly abstruse. And in this striving to not say too much, he ends up not saying much of anything at all.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Chbosky surrounds his hurting characters with the cinematic equivalent of a hug circle – which is sweet, but rather antithetical to tension-building.

Top Trailers