Kimberley Jones
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For 675 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 All the Real Girls
Lowest review score: 0 Yu-Gi-Oh!: The Movie
Score distribution:
675 movie reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Vuillards, however fractured, know one another's rhythms and rituals, and Desplechin knows just how to convey them in the subtlest of ways.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect that, like the Coen brothers, David Lynch, and Wes Anderson -– our American masters of idiosyncrasy -– Kaurismäki has a limited appeal. Those who get him, really get him.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Anderson and his co-writer Roman Coppola have crafted an elegant and emphatic metaphor for adolescence, that tumultuous province of firsts and lasts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    When the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River began construction in the early Nineties, an estimated 2 million people's lives were impacted. That's a staggering number to contemplate, but Up the Yangtze effectively personalizes that near-meaningless number by putting a face on at least a few of those 2 million.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The deeply heartfelt Milk is more of a surface skim: a fairly standard biopic – if a very fine one, indeed – but never the transcendent work one would have hoped from the filmmaker or his subject.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Looper makes a full-meal entertainment out of piecemealing genres: It boasts the kicky mental gymnastics that come with time-travel terrain, the relentless rapid heart rate of a crackerjack thriller, and the bursts of extreme violence, buttressed with black humor, of a modern actioner.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Descendants is beautifully shot (by Phedon Papamichael) and compellingly performed, especially by its young stars, and it has moments of startling tenderness. If only it didn't feel phony to its bones.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Snowpiercer holds its own; it’s an unruly but rattling – and ravishing – work of art. On first watch, I wondered if there was anything to scratch beneath the surface – it seemed so straightforward, I worried there wasn’t enough there there – so I rewatched it almost right away and was surprised to find it still left me panting.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Far more engrossing are the long, dialogue-free stretches that fix on, say, bobbing feet or curled fists on a speed bag. The soundscape, too, is endlessly fascinating, a layer cake of squeaks, grunts, gasps, and rattling chains that, combined, catches a rhythm that sounds an awful lot like song.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This is an animated film that happily has room for both an existentialist dread of death and a grinning joie de vivre.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Sollett’s first feature is a small, but indelible picture, one that approaches the most universal of themes -– first love, confused hormones, parental clashes -– with originality.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Excepting the occasional shot that forces the eye on a particular dancer, Wenders largely films the action in a way that re-creates the effect of attending a performance in a proscenium theatre – only without having to scrabble for the best seat in the house. No matter where you are, you're already in it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The middle is terrific, especially in a lengthy, unassuming scene in which the three leads sit, sip drinks, and have a good chat: It marks one of the great celluloid pleasures of the year, so virtuosically written, performed, and filmed is it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The film also inspires, if unconsciously, the viewer to rethink what exactly constitutes art.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Sugar is a curiosity – too somber for a picaresque, too arm's-length for much emotional effect – and while it's interesting, it's never truly absorbing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It packs a hefty emotional wallop.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and touching, Frances Ha may very well be the most eloquent take yet on a generation in flux – a cinematic talk-back to so many Atlantic articles, minus the scolding and the statistics, and uncharacteristically (for Baumbach) uncynical.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Screamingly funny. Like I said, terrific stuff.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An outstanding cast have crafted a delicate, eloquent picture of believable humans in so many gradations of hurt, but it stops just shy of catharsis.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The upshot to a ticking bomb is that it only explodes the once, but Rachel's sister, Kym (Hathaway), goes off again and again.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The pictures are gorgeous, and the words, well, if you listen hard enough, the words say exactly what one needs to hear: that is, to wake up and live.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Blancanieves never lags, per se, it’s just awfully in love with itself: with its gorgeous black and white chiaroscuros and whirling-dervish first-person camera perspectives, the Spanish-guitar-scored dance sequences (that include the undeniable dance of the matador in action), and battering winds of emotional extremes. By the end of this sumptuous and sincerely felt melodrama, I was rather in love with it, too.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Delicious.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    As with "Sunshine," I'd call Juno a family film if only it didn't make teen pregnancy look so sporting. Instead, we'll settle for that rare bird, an indie comedy that uplifts – funny and smart, totally trying to be cool and succeeding, and heartfelt to boot.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Those moments, as affecting as they are, can't surmount the overworkshopped feel of the whole film.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A restless, nervy actor, Hardy seems to get a kick out of tying one hand behind his back. He dominated "The Dark Knight Rises" even with a modified ball gag obscuring most of his face. Here, locked behind a steeling wheel and a conceptual gimmick, he only has the upper half of his body to work with. No surprise to anybody who’s been paying attention: Half a Hardy adds up to a hell of a lot.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Grief doesn't exactly sound like a promising starting point for a love story, but, really, what a bounty Mills presents to us of beauty and buoyancy and possibility.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Fish Tank isn't an easy watch – it's like two hours of ache – but there are rich rewards to be had in the many ways Arnold and her terrific team rend us to and fro.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What's in a name? Lately, less and less. With Daniel Craig's third go at 007, I'm not sure there's much left that distinguishes Bond from Bourne from Batman. They're all slurping from the same soup – think: death-haunted, self-righteous, tight-lipped and -quipped, parkour enthusiast.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It closes the film in what I suspect was intended as something of a happy ending, but it’s unnecessary: Thirty happy years should be happy ending enough.