Kimberley Jones

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For 724 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
Lowest review score: 0 The Women
Score distribution:
724 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Sugar is a curiosity – too somber for a picaresque, too arm's-length for much emotional effect – and while it's interesting, it's never truly absorbing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There are no hard answers in Room 237, a feature-length, sporadically engaging exploration of the latter (The Shining).
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The very best animation can excite the senses and inflame the imagination. But Chico & Rito's charmless line drawings just made me wish the film was live-action instead.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The elements are all here for something spectacular – and in brilliant bursts, Jeunet really gets it – but in the end, all that potential is sunk by a terminally confused tone and milquetoast pairing of lovers. Pity that.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    In his short career (The Station Agent, The Visitor), McCarthy has established himself as a craftsman of conventionally quirky pictures that are ENTIRELY about ingratiating themselves with the audience.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The camera may dive deep, but the content skims mere surface.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The filmmakers no doubt had a hell of a time whittling the material down; unfortunately, what they came up with was something long on the mundaneness of GovWorks.com and short on the personalities behind it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s worth a watch to see these two reliably comic actors do some heavy dramatic lifting and tenderly spot for each other.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Morris has found a real character in McKinney, but to what end, I couldn't say.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Frozen can count in its favor visual grandeur, two energetic young women as co-leads, and a couple of plot twists that place the film a cut above your average princess fare.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    When The Company owns up to what it is -– a performance piece -– it’s glorious. Everything else -– the window-dressing of a fiction film -– just gums up that gloriousness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film holds its twists too close to the chest, and there's little to chew on till the ambitiousness of its plotting is revealed late in the film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Starts out as a lark, but veers into grittier, more emotionally complex territory -- just like a real relationship -- that the film doesn't have the chops to sustain.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A certain inevitability hangs over The Mother – as if any of this could end well – but if Kureishi's framework is perhaps predictable, his knotty, complex characters are not.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It doesn't have the bite to be satire, the pratfalls to be broad comedy, or the wit to pass as a comedy of manners. What does that leave? The French cinematic equivalent of motivational coaching, and -- just like Pignon -- something spectacularly unspectacular.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's impossible to shake the feeling that these are merely actors -- albeit good ones.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ambrose owns this crawlspace between being fierce and being fragile. But she can't escape the fact that her role is underwritten; the script suffers from an excess of subtlety.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    If you shy away from that sick feeling in the pit of the stomach that comes when watching good people make bad decisions, then best to steer clear of Manito, a low-budget indie that reaches near-Greek proportions of tragedy brought on by lousy decision-making.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Something is terribly amiss when the American actors sound like English is their second language.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Everything that was sharp in the original text has been rounded and buffed.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ultimately Hedges’ film, like the turkey, comes out underdone.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Gilroy zings the film with tantalizing bits of absurdity (one wonders, wistfully, what the Coen brothers would have done with this material), but too often he returns to his darker, more ponderous instincts.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Digging for Fire fails its title’s own promise: It has the capacity for startling insight and artistry, but mostly it’s just a toe listlessly pushing dirt around.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Perhaps there was some confusion – should we play this as a lark or a lesson in geopolitical unrest? – or maybe there was some studio involvement to defang the politics; whatever the case, the noncommittal Charlie Wilson's War treads a good-natured but yawning in-between.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's nothing that feels like real rage, nothing that even remotely approximates the spiritual decimation of a termination.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    When the action shifts to Bill’s childhood home – an islet along the Thames, downriver from the legendary Shepperton Studios – some of the magic of that place rubs off on Boorman’s picture: It becomes lighter on its feet, moves with the breath of life and not just the strength of memory.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Amusing enough, but weirdly joyless.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As is, it's simply too much information crammed too haphazardly into a running time that at times borders on interminable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's unclear if Van Sant intends to inspire guilt; here, as elsewhere, he is exasperatingly abstruse. And in this striving to not say too much, he ends up not saying much of anything at all.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Chbosky surrounds his hurting characters with the cinematic equivalent of a hug circle – which is sweet, but rather antithetical to tension-building.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The subject itself – the musicians, the music – and the spirit of the thing – one son’s obvious devotion – transcend the film’s technical shortcomings.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As an unsparing portrait of disaffection among the small-paycheck, faux-creative class, The Future is rather astute … which isn't to say it isn't also bang-your-head-on-the-wall annoying.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Girl Who Played With Fire's chief frustration is in how removed Salander and Blomkvist are from each other.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Grace and Johannson's courtship has all the heat of a wet wipe and, worse yet, leaves Quaid offscreen for long stretches.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A romantic comedy, too, but this time the romance is between two women, and one of them, truth be told, is a dud.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It has a basic goodness of heart that counteracts, if not entirely cancels out, the film's broadness and busyness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's unclear where the buck stops in terms of creative authority – at one point, Clayman complains that "the only thing I feel in control of is the money" – which renders OC87 at once a remarkable achievement, and a fatally compromised film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The final conflict is so protracted as to comfortably accommodate a bathroom break. Don't worry. You won't miss anything you haven't seen before.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The film's "never grow up" refrain plays like a broken record, until, in an abrupt (but not unexpected) turnaround at film's end, it fixes itself.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s not like Monsters University is a bad movie. It’s just not a terribly interesting one.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Feels like a Fincher film: It possesses the same smarts, the same visual panache, the same violence. But not the same heart.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Warmed my heart about as much as the cold cream Angèle slathers all over her wrinkling clients.
    • Austin Chronicle
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In manipulating its many disparate characters to bump into each other and set plot lines in motion, Intermission walks a fine line between clever and contrived, with the scale tipping more often toward contrived.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The movie can be funny in fits, but too often the scripters go for the obvious and uninspired.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The movie lumbers on some more, reiterating the obvious and relying on overfamiliar imagery. Audiences have a long year to wait for Part 2. Would it not have been better to leave them breathless than heaving a sigh?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    I’m all for ambiguity, but Dear Frankie’s multiple dangling threads indicate incoherent storytelling, not profundity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There's no denying the dazzling effect, but a fireworks sequence midfilm only underscores the sad fact that there's no lasting illumination here, only the fast-burn spitzing of bang snaps.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Wright is terrific – sensitive and alert – in the live-action opening. But that opening runs more than 45 minutes long, a way too heavy-handed preamble to the crazed animation to come, and the actress’ vocal delivery – soft-spoken, gently bewildered – is too soporific to pull off lines like, “Look at me, I’m your prophet of doom.”
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Yes, this is the stuff of fiction, where individuals can drift in and out of another's life and make extraordinary, unbelievable things happen.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Kit Kittredge is a dutiful bore. Still, I couldn't help but wonder if, in the face of all-out market collapse, it might serve a dual purpose as primer for kiddies on economic depression – because food stamps always taste better with a side order of spunk. Or is it pluck?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a curiously inert, workmanlike production: a whole lot of pomp and incircumstance.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Still, when The Yellow Handkerchief finally hooks into the meat of Hamill’s source story, the narrative tension puts enough wind in the film’s sails to arrive at its corny but sentimentally satisfying conclusion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Perfectly passable film.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Help may be more interested in the moral at the end of the story than the story itself, but what saves the film from its meticulous one-dimensionality is that nuanced, deeply moving cast.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Counselors and campers' moms tend to tear up when they talk about the lessons these girls are learning, lessons that go way beyond how to tune a bass, but this isn't exactly a "rah-rah" film.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A grinning but toothless comedy, this Christmas-themed outing pales in inventiveness compared to the original, which brought sweet, silly anarchy to its one-thing-leads-to-another plotting.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There is a plot – a pretty clunky one, jerry-rigged with character motivations that amount to one long “huh?” and dialogue that might as well have been chunked out of a cliche generator – but who needs plot when we can have mayhem?
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect a second viewing would uncover more information embedded in the mise-en-scène; had Trance – tonally a jumble and disorienting to the point of distraction – rewarded the audience with the pure perfection of a Keyser Söze-like reveal, I’d be more inclined to make the return trip.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This is Jackman’s show entirely, and he’s as forceful and charismatic as ever as the walking, talking hurt that is Wolverine. If only he had something more interesting to do here.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Duplass brothers have an exceptional eye for microexpressions (yes, they're still zoom-happy), and there's something to be admired in this new interest in a macro lens on the universe's workings. If only it didn't take wading through so much drear to get to that divine.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In all his misguided enthusiasm, Parker has mustered enough bluster to fill up a zeppelin, blowing harder and harder, for something more and more fanciful. But with so much hot air, the bubble is bound to burst, and so it does in Parker's blundering adaptation.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Has a heart bursting with good intentions, something that goes a long way in dimming from memory its inherent routineness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A clever idea that never stretches beyond just that -- a caterpillar that never blooms into a butterfly.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Terrio's technically proficient film is mature, modern, and minus the all-important passion and risk.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There’s a surprising – and truthful – melancholic undercurrent to Definitely, Maybe – the one commonality between the three women is the heartbreak they induce – but Brooks undermines that truthfulness with a dogmatic insistence upon romantic mythologizing. No maybes about it: The reality is far darker, and more interesting.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Occasional animated inserts inspired by Chantry’s work as an illustrator, while accomplished, inject an off-note of whimsy that doesn’t quite square with the script’s stabs at edgier humor.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Once the film gets cooking, the questions never stop. For instance: When you find the dead body of someone you love, isn’t your first call to the cops?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Much of the original film's geniality – and all of its pro-environment stumping – has gone missing; what we have instead is a watered-down likeness that curiously turns disaster flick in its too-scary third act.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The landscape and the lovers are pretty to look at, but two households divided should really pack more of a punch.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The supposedly epic battle the entire film builds toward – the single action set-piece – is a ho-hummer. Fire and ice, turns out, was an oversell: Think tepid tap water instead.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Brothers is too depthless to dredge up any tears.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Glory Road really isn't a bad show – it's just an obvious one – and one wishes material of this historical import had received a more refined rendering.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Oh, how I rued my failed foreign-language skills in the opening moments of Gemma Bovery. Who wants to read subtitles when a French baker is rolling out such pliant, such pokeable, such heavenly looking dough?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Paul is offensive solely for being so underachieving.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The ideas are there, hints of genius, but no one ignites them. Add Osmosis Jones to that list of universal enigmas, and, more specifically, how the Farrelly Brothers could have done so little with so much.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The climax, like the film itself, is big, loud, and looks cool enough, which is what we’ve come to expect from summer movies … but not from Robert Rodriguez.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    By film's end, you'll wish they tossed Allen in the rainforest and left him for the leopards to snack on.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Morning Glory had the capacity to be a smarter, tarter picture, though it's not bad as is: well-acted and ingratiating, with at least one howlingly funny sequence.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    We have pretty much all the information we need within the first half-hour, which undercuts the supposedly climactic reveal of the contents of Maruge's letter and renders the torturous flashbacks unnecessary for narrative purposes. And not a little bit sadomasochistic, too – an ill fit for a PG-13 family film.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This con artist caper from the writer/director duo behind "Bad Santa" and "I Love You Philip Morris" bears some superficial resemblance to the 2005 romantic comedy "Hitch."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This is no more (but no less?) than what we have rather oddly come to expect from Neeson in his late period (Taken, The A-Team).
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This Native American romantic comedy, which won the Audience Award at the 2001 Austin Film Festival, arrives in theatres four years late but seasonally right on time.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The misfits, as ever, must take a back seat to the morality, and the result – while in no way migraine-inducing – traffics in rote truisms.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Never thrills on an emotional level the way the best of sports films – a "Hoosiers," say – can, but it's a satisfying entertainment nonetheless.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This latest offering continues a trend toward increasingly mature moviemaking from the actor/writer/director.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Uneven, ineffective mash-up of sex comedy and artillery-heavy action.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I suppose when you make a movie, however tangentially, about Viagra, you're required to insert at least one scene of its side effects, but the broadness with which Zwick plays it out is like a stake to the heart of the film's hard-earned but fast-lost authenticity.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Frustrations abound with this limited film, but Wild Horse, Wild Ride does one thing exceptionally well, and that is convey the emotional bond between trainer and horse.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    As the songs pile up and the plot putters along, Romance & Cigarettes wears thin, like a moral for the titular addiction: Sure, there’s the sweet dream of that first drag, but a whole pack’ll do a body bad.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Liberal Arts is not unlikable: There are some intelligent observations about how humans woo, and the film is so suffused with sincerity you want to give it a pat on the head just for trying so hard.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Luhrmann has always had a knack with the fever of passion, but here he only catches high fever’s empty gibberish.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Phillips and co-writer Scot Armstrong waste too much time on a silly love-interest subplot for Wilson; that time is much better served by the frat-boy idiocies, like Frank beer-bonging himself into streaking.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Ambling, just-passable picture.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is a very pretty production – pretty colors, pretty scenery, pretty bromides – and a busy one, too, which helps distract us from the sad fact that the movie is generous and humane but not all that interesting.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Myla Goldberg's novel about spelling-bee fever, a family in chaos, and religious/mystic exploration arrives on the screen with all its faults intact, but few of its charms.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a bold and certainly credible move, but the execution is something of a belly flop. Thanks for Sharing isn’t really about a disease, only the cure, and that bias makes it a plausible picture of the Friend of Bill community-based recovery, but kind of a sham as a portrait of actual human beings.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Well, we're not in "Chicago" anymore, or even its soundstage approximation, but that hasn't stopped Oscar-nominated director Rob Marshall from fashioning another epic spectacle out of two squabbling women in (a sort-of) show business.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The music so wholly engulfs the second half of the film, there’s no room left to expand on characters that feel less than lived-in or on the film’s more ambitious ideas.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Sparks, an acting novice, falters when her character must muster gumption or sexual heat. She saves her best for last in a barnburner singing performance, but it's too little, too late – especially with the memory of Houston's one song – a heart-stopping gospel number – still ringing in the ears.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    If I may presume: Thatcher probably would have preferred more action, less talk.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The promising-sounding football movie would turn out to be a movie about men talking on phones.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The first act is very nearly unbearable, leaden and doomy and generically plotted.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The Big Year's biggest disappointment is its inadequacy in elucidating the passion of the birder. What ardency, and what an exceptional, impenetrable world they move in. I for one wanted a better look at it.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Rather born to wear a frock coat, Dancy shares the stammer-blush, winning-grin methodology of countryman Hugh Grant, only with more probity and better posture.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Wanderlust is flawed, too, but for its exploration of financial ruin and alternative lifestyles, it shows once again that Aniston, at the very least, knows which way the wind is blowing.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Luhrmann wants it all – comedy and tragedy, bombast and wet-eyed sentimentality. When it works, his kid-in-a-candy-store giddiness is infectious. When it doesn't – when he goes from silly to turgid in 60 seconds flat – he punctures Australia's proportions down from epic to simply overwrought.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Doesn't do much to further distinguish Lehmann's career. As for those of us waiting for the year's first worthwhile date movie, the wait continues.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film is by no means a disaster. Possession is prettily performed, prettily put-together. Yet, for a story set so firmly in the center of a fire, LaBute and his players have suited themselves in some mighty flame-retardant threads.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's kinda funny and pretty cute. Sometimes that's all it takes.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Kiddos: I'm sighing, too, but only from relief it's all behind us now.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Gondry’s well-meaning but too soft, too structure-less picture.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Either you like your movies to be, well, movie-like: imitations of life, with musical accompaniment and artificial lighting and tracking shots and looped dialogue; or you like them to be re-creations of life, sans the artifice. The King Is Alive clearly falls into the latter camp.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The bland script and direction are spruced up by a likable cast.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There are momentary pleasures, to be sure – a corker of a kiss here, an Otis Redding-backed barroom slink there – but frankly, I'm a little weary of Wong wearing "that same old shaggy dress."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Saint Laurent gets across how isolating celebrity can be, how exhausting it is to keep a toehold on top of a mountain that keeps shifting underfoot. But the film is allergic to insight: It’s as numbed-out as its hero addict.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The soundtrack is a boisterous blast from the past, and there's a quiet pleasure to watching Zoe and Daly let their composure loose like scrambled eggs, but there's little else to hold dear here.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film never recovers its initial fizzy-pop charms, owing largely to pacing that turns positively molasses-slow in the second act.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Size matters, too, in Live From New York!, a portrait of SNL at 40, but in inverse: 82 minutes isn’t nearly long enough to consider every angle – or even many angles – of a cultural institution.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There are flashes of wit and flair here, including two stylish sequences detailing the French obsession with food and scarves, but they are but brief respites from the film’s near-pathological drear.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I COULD do without "Dancing Queen" stuck in my head, but that will unstick soon enough, and with any luck so too will the memory of Streep noodling on an air guitar.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Despite his character's fondness for mugging and mouthing like Michael Corleone, Spacey (and by extension, his director and writer Norman Snider) can't quite catch the operatic wallop of Corleone's arc, possibly because the film is played top-to-bottom like a caprice.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It goes down easy, with likable performances and a laudable emphasis on love and compassion.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Fine to look at, but good luck feeling anything.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Wimpy Kid's filmmakers have gone off-book, so to speak, to inflect Greg with a surprising cruel streak.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Anyone who watched (and probably wept his or her way through) the swoony 2004 melodrama "The Notebook" knows Cassavetes is not a man to leave a spot of sap untapped, and in My Sister's Keeper, he pulls out a very big drill indeed.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Bell steals every scene she's in, and her abrupt dismissal feels all the crueler for so much charisma wasted: She shoulda been a contender.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Roberts, wearing that beatific half-smile of hers that suggests inner peace and wisdom before she's even begun her journey, is too open-faced with her emotions to signal the complexities of Gilbert's distress – over her divorce, her control issues, her rootlessness, and inability to live in the moment.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    For better or worse (and I'd argue the latter), the aliens are as monolithically evil, unformed, and un-individuated as characters as Native Americans once were in the earliest of Westerns.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Perhaps the more appropriate question to put to this remake would be "What the hell’s the point?"
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Short to short, it’s a Russian roulette.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Amusing but never rousing, this fourth installment in the Ice Age cartoon franchise comes fretted with freezer burn.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    What's translated to film feels like a rough draft, with bullet points at beginning and end, demarcating Lola lost, Lola found. And in the middle? A vast, vague maw.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This British rom-com is all soft and plodgy, a by-the-numbers redemption tale that careens uncomfortably from sentimentality to stomach-turning sight gags.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The resultant film is all surface and plush, with nary a hard edge or demanding note. Despite the movie's well-intentioned heart, its head is out to lunch, neglecting its responsibility to provide these powerhouse actresses with a script half as smart or compelling as they.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Undone by Blanchett's dull, wooden delivery. She's the pap that kills the pulp the rest of the film is bellowing out to be.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The bestselling first book in yet another dystopic Young Adult series, Veronica Roth’s Divergent is engrossing enough to devour overnight, and flimsy enough to forget by morning light. Neil Burger’s film adaptation faithfully reproduces the same effect.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    For every zinger, there are two flat jokes around the corner.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The exceedingly silly Super Troopers is an earnest, mostly funny spoof.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The only thrill here comes from the adrenaline kick of the chase. Alas, it's an empty, Pavlovian kick at best.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Fletcher demonstrates, as with her second film, "27 Dresses," that she can put together a funny, able romantic comedy that is a cut above, but no more. Still, those leads are awfully likable, the Massachusetts-for-Alaska landscape rather picturesque, and if The Proposal doesn't reinvent the wheel, merrily we roll along nonetheless.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Book of Secrets isn’t so much a romp as a long trudge through American history factoids and conspiracy-theory gobbledygook. Cool car chase, though.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    When the boys are tossing balls around and bopping in time to Notorious B.I.G., they -- and the film -- are right-on.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Cornpone caricatures abound (witness "Hoedown Throwdown," in which Miley sunnily urges us to "pop it, lock it, polka dot it"), but so do worthy messages about responsibility – to family, community, even Mother Earth.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's like 90 minutes of teasing foreplay, and then, just when it's about to get really good, your partner rolls over and goes to sleep.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Little more than a constant and occasionally pretty imaginative sex show.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s all supremely silly stuff, and amusingly so, as long as you don’t stop to think about all those blameless officers and agents cut down in the line of mindless entertainment.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Until Hollywood stops being a boys club, and America graduates beyond short pants and its embarrassingly pubescent attitudes toward sex, I suppose one can only hope that all male adolescent fantasies will play as goofily sweet as this one.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's some funny stuff here that doesn't involve degrading its female protagonists, and the cast, by and large, is appealing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It IS consistently funny. Its trash-can humor is tasteless, no doubt, but hey, that doesn't make it unpalatable.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Midway through, there’s a truly riotous set-piece involving Bruiser’s gay love affair with a Great Dane, but not even a Chihuahua in leather bondage gear can zest up a franchise that has degraded from sleeper to snoozer.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Mancini's character boils down to a lot of self-loathing and unresolved mommy issues – which is as tedious as it sounds.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The jokes hit about half the time – the best bits have an off-the-cuff feel – and it’s pocked with the kind of rom-com clichés that are practically written in stone (screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna's script for "The Devil Wears Prada" was far sharper).
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    “Caution: Contents may induce brain bleed.” That is, if you think too hard on the logic and mechanics of its time-travel conceit.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The trouble with retooling fairy tales to jibe with our more enlightened times is that too often the fun gets stripped along with the offensive parts.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Fact is, good looks will go a long way in masking mediocrity, and Hollywood Homicide capitalizes on that fact doubly so: Co-writer/director Ron Shelton’s latest boasts two pretty faces, and all across the country, mothers and daughters sigh alike.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The cast seems to have been assembled primarily for its blinking resemblance to the stars of the original Eighties TV series about a renegade group of former Army Rangers now for hire.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Isaac and Olsen are both mesmerizing actors, and Lange and Felton also do very good work in supporting roles, but their collective gameness – all that acting their pants off (sometimes literally) – is underserved by the film’s script and direction.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This is fussy filmmaking, overly made-up (the costume mandate seems to include the buzzwords "coffee filters," "croquembouche," and "Day-Glo paint") and bereft of wit.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    To say the least, the chemistry is lacking; equally unconvincing is the all-British cast’s attempts at American accents.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It's hard, as a viewer, not to shudder in tandem with Lisa – this isn't a love match, it's two would-be motivational coaches swapping slogans.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    That's the ultimate cheat in this pleasant, but trifling affair: Allen has cheated himself out of an actress (Leoni) that could have been Diane Keaton's heir.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Bruce Almighty attempts to blend both sides of the actor – comedic and dramatic – and while Carrey achieved that balance quite wonderfully in "The Truman Show," Bruce Almighty doesn't so much straddle the fence as impale itself on it.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Frankly, I don't like to be bullied, and bullying is exactly what Knight and Day – overly cute and overconvinced of its own cool – does best.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Knoxville, in his first dramatic role, does what he can with script and direction that aggressively eschew any insight into Kaufman's grief.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Their travelogue-ready romance is utterly doofy but not disagreeable, and this sort of wish-fulfillment fantasy will strike the right chord with Moore’s fan base of preteen girls.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Far more interesting than Juli and Bryce's banal budding love is Reiner and co-scripter Andrew Scheinman's sensitive exploration of how parents shape their children.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's just no reconciling the film's ambivalent message. Newell hangs a modern sensibility on a supposed period piece, and hangs his film in the process.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It runs the stopwatch on a chase sequence to a comical extreme and takes way, way too long to take its final bow, in the process burning off any residual goodwill.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It’s just too much drama for one modest film to service adequately. In an effort to cram it all in, scenes abruptly jump from one to the next with nary a smooth transition in sight, relationships evolve far too quickly, and certain subplots drop out of the mix only to resurface, jarringly, much later.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    What it needs is a little more dirtying down. What it needs, in short, is less New York, and more Alabama.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Sure, it's nifty enough to see dust particles swirling or hands swooshing at you, but mostly the 3-D muddles the invention and exquisiteness of the film's raison d'être: the dancing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The stripped-down title gets at what we're really here for: the cars. Are they fast? Check. Are they furious? Yep.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It comes as no surprise that the film is less about fandom as it is about the community fans create with one another – who else to turn to when the object of your affection, your enduring obsession, blows big chunks? – and Fanboys, a likable, shaggy picture, pays nice tribute to that community.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In the end, we know Andie and Ben will kiss and make up -– how could too alliteratively aligned pretty people not? -– but first we must wade through the protracted and wholly unwarranted period in which both huffs about the other’s deceptions.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A lightweight, intermittently engaging comedy.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    They’re not all hideous, the men who sit for interviews with a graduate student (Nicholson) and unload their dirty laundry. Sometimes they’re just feckless, or crass; some are even pitiable.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The script negates anything heartfelt with its flippant, almost vulgar tone.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Although the transvestites’ plight – mishandled, misunderstood, and/or misappropriated – is meant to supply Connie and Carla's emotional core, one never gets the feeling of anything stronger than an at-shoulder-length's sympathy from this film.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Two Eighties genre staples – Disease-of-the-Week and Poppin' the Cherry – meet, shake hands, and mostly play nice in this sweet, if overly earnest feature.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The whole thing still reeks of voyeurism -- and not the fly-on-the-wall voyeurism of a vérité doc, but rather the dirty-old-man-in-the-peep-show-booth kind. Might as well just wait for it to hit late-night cable.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's nothing here for the viewer to do, no kinks to work out, no double-crossings to anticipate, not even a half-hearted flail at figuring out how Danny ticks.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There is much to recommend this earnest and enraged film.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Perhaps Sucsy was overwhelmed by his immersion in such colorful and outré material; he's chosen for his followup, the I Can't Believe It's Not Nicholas Sparks weepie The Vow, the cinematic equivalent of a lie-down.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Patinkin and King’s characters’ wrangling with spirituality is sincere, and specific. Everything else in this everything-and-the-kitchen-sink film feels like too many ideas stored up over an especially long winter.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Once spoiled by the gossamer disquietude of Kim Jee-woon's original Tale, it's difficult to view this Americanized version in anything but the blandest light.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    After two hours of Vera's pretty but wet-blanket direction, it's too late to ignite any fireworks, even in the hands of such capable actors.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film's best stretch, wherein each American gal is romanced by an international lover, faintly recalling the Fifties' sudser "Three Coins in the Fountain."
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Two hours pass painlessly enough, thanks to the affability of its trio of leads, Hathaway, Andrews, and Elizondo.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Big, dumb, and fun.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A bright idea, disappointingly dulled in the execution.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Product placement aside, there’s an admirable, even sweet, message about fellowship and misfit pride shot through the whole script, and Vaughn is rather touching as a kind of cuddly uncle figure to his fellow interns.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    For such a deft wit, Jane Austen sure has inspired some nitwitted entertainments. Actually, the Austen influence here is negligible.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It's all pretty goofy, which I assume is the point, but it's also pretty dull.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Hopelessly old-fashioned then, but not the aggressively bad picture you might have anticipated.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Instantly forgettable but good-natured all the same.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It’s an impossible standard, maybe, but in 42 minutes, TV’s "Friday Night Lights" delivered all-star-level emotional complexity and action. When the Game Stands Tall is strictly JV squad.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's a Big Idea movie that comes out only half-baked.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Not a man, but the romanticizing of him. A lot of jive-shit.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A decent enough spot of silliness.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Instantly forgettable but intermittently funny movie.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The opening montage is a jazzy, grabby thing, artfully layering the kids’ auditions to mimic the frenzied pace of the day. But that freneticism never really goes away, nor does the staccato timing.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It’s clear this director sees carnage as nothing more than an opportunity for music-video production values.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    For a comedy, The Sitter is frightfully spare on full-bodied laughs.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Tiny and well-intentioned but dramatically inert and sham-kooky, Girl Most Likely is for Kristen Wiig completists only, and even they may squirm at spending a whole movie waiting for her character to pull her head out of her ass.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    For the first 30 minutes I couldn't shake the feeling that I was watching a really promising pilot for network TV.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A film that is long on atmosphere, but short on smarts: Plot points are easily unraveled 20 minutes in advance (no fun sleuthing for the audience here), the ending is an unsatisfying pastiche off too many horror tropes, and it would take a week to plug all of Gothika’s gaps in logic.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Most devastating to the film’s effectiveness is its inability to convey that one essential to the story of Amelia Earhart: the tangible pleasures of flying.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    There's something good-natured, even sweet about this well-meaning affair.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Imagine "Little Miss Sunshine's" dark materials (and superior craftsmanship) diluted with a Hannah Montana-like sunny silliness – which is to say: sometimes funny, often broad-stroked, ever sweet, and landing shy of its potential.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The richly hued CG animation is quite nice – a mix of hyperdetailed character work and painterly cityscapes and pastorals – and the script putters along with small but regular amusements.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The movie scores some laughs, all of which come from the expert Giamatti.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Thrillers don’t come much more nondescript than this: If Runner Runner were a color scheme, it would be beige, with an accent wall in taupe.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Fairly uninspiring, but it still manages to ingratiate itself, largely through the efforts of Krasinski in a secondary part.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Scooby's just so dang cute, what's the point in grousing?
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This film adaptation feels like YA, with cat’s-cradle love matches, soft-focus sexuality, and a main character who never satisfactorily makes the transition from page to screen.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It's a nice, friendly kind of love, but hardly an inspiring one.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Still, once you accept Paul W.S. Anderson's entirely unnecessary adaptation on its own terms (nonsensical, underachieving), it has its limited charms, which include a snigger-inducing alphabet soup of accents, a standout rooftop swordfight, and British comedian James Corden as the Musketeers' put-upon manservant.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This isn’t Nicole Kidman’s first dalliance with witchcraft, and it is one of Bewitched’s unfortunate achievements that it actually makes one pine for Kidman’s 1998 dud, "Practical Magic." That witch at least had some sass; this cardigan-clad witch, alas, is an altogether more benign being, and by "benign" I mean boring.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Lucas and Moore aren’t savvy enough, or brave enough, to truly plumb the gallows humor embedded in their premise.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Little girls will love it. I used to be a little girl once, too. I didn’t care much for the Top 40 glossy coat slathered over every song, but this heart will never harden to a spunky kid who’s certain the sun’ll come out tomorrow.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    In terms of a pre-teen instructional, Sleepover offers throughout a laudable emphasis on the importance of friendship, but parents may rightfully flinch at a protagonist who is ultimately rewarded for breaking all the rules.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Alexander's script considers context anathema, leaving us to wonder, among other puzzlers, why these two jerks are friends to begin with – and, perhaps, on what bad breakup or neglected childhood one may blame the film's dispiriting misanthropy.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The action is constant, often pointless, definitely gratuitous, and breathlessly fun.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Life at least deserves a nod for supplying the mostly dramatic actress with her first starring comedic role.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    This is in fact the end – it is what is. We’ve had some good laughs. Let’s part amicably.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    A lot of gunk: dance-offs, sing-alongs, awkward exes, and a dirty-talking White blasting through, I'm afraid, the last bits of her novelty. That again?
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Overall, Just Married doesn't really take -- it has a shelf life about as short as the disastrous honeymoon -- but in the moment, it's cute, if corny. It'll do.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Failed feminist statement or not, Coyote Ugly is a likable, if confused film.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    If A Thousand Words' formula seems familiar, that's because writer Steve Koren has tripped down this quasi-metaphysical path before in "Bruce Almighty" and "Click."
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The real tension of the piece lies in the sound design, with its layering of heavy breaths, inexplicably compromised frequencies, and invasive thwackings of no known origin to the ship hull.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Leaves me wanting to watch Tomei and company in something more worthy of their abilities.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Wouldn't it make more sense on basic cable? Plum screen incarnate (and film producer) Katherine Heigl got her start in TV, on Roswell and Grey's Anatomy, and her public persona – a combination of prickliness and adoration-seeking that has famously grated on viewers' and critics' nerves alike – has historically played better there.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Saving Christmas will hold little interest for anyone not already a believer. It’s too single-minded in its instructional purpose, too averse to multidimensional characters, too youth-pastor-like in its dorky humor.

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