Kimberley Jones
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For 689 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Grand Budapest Hotel
Lowest review score: 0 Alex & Emma
Score distribution:
689 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A restless, nervy actor, Hardy seems to get a kick out of tying one hand behind his back. He dominated "The Dark Knight Rises" even with a modified ball gag obscuring most of his face. Here, locked behind a steeling wheel and a conceptual gimmick, he only has the upper half of his body to work with. No surprise to anybody who’s been paying attention: Half a Hardy adds up to a hell of a lot.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Grief doesn't exactly sound like a promising starting point for a love story, but, really, what a bounty Mills presents to us of beauty and buoyancy and possibility.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Fish Tank isn't an easy watch – it's like two hours of ache – but there are rich rewards to be had in the many ways Arnold and her terrific team rend us to and fro.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Nothing short of majestic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The sum is something deeply profound: about awkwardness, culture clash, failed connections, and – ultimately – the strength that comes from surviving a trial by fire.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's all about the little things, and the way in which the little things can steal into your heart in big ways.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This drama-horror hybrid, set within a New York ballet company, strikes a tone more along the lines of the terrifying hallucinatories of Aronofsky's breakout film, "Requiem for a Dream," revisiting, too, favorite themes of monster mommies and female hysteria.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I can't remember the last time I felt so seduced by a film.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    A riot of sight and sound that, however baffling, has an irresistible, elemental pull.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Dogme pedigree rarely distracts; there is too much emotional investment to care much about dogmatic fidelity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Cue the footage of Cockettes in spangles and glitter, high-kicking and belting out show tunes at the top of their lungs. Damn, it looks grand.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Immigrant is two hours long, but I stayed even longer in my seat, through the credits, still in thrall to it all. The title is singular, but the scope is not so easily quantifiable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Last Station would have satisfied alone as a witty, manic lark, but as it moves toward the titular railway station, the film unfurls into so much more – a work of compassion, modulated mournfulness, and unchecked joy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mud
    With American independent film teeming with so many shaky-cam snarksters, what an electric riposte to the status quo is Nichols, whose films are classically constructed and deadly serious. In his short but potent career, he’s mastered a wide-vistaed eye for the epic and the elemental.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In an age of doggedly unambitious comedy, one marvels at the finesse these first-time screenwriters and director Feig bring to marrying raunch, romantic comedy, and the tested but ever-true bond between women.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s an indie film about abortion that comes snuggled in the broad strokes of a quirky relationship comedy. A grump might wonder when indie films got so soft, but I’m more intrigued by the inverse: Why aren’t more studio films this clever and winning and conversant in the same language as their audience?
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A rare achievement.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's all so goddamn realistic and reminiscent of real-life love (and how often does that happen onscreen?) that The Puffy Chair would be hell to watch if it weren't so funny.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In the House, from the eclectic French filmmaker François Ozon (Under the Sand, 8 Women), is an almost perverse delight, an egghead thriller that slyly shell-games its truer purpose as an inquiry into the construction – and deconstruction – of fiction. Scratch deconstruction: Make that tear-the-house-down demolition.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Smart, uncanny, resistant to the short cuts of pop psychology, and shocking in the best since of the word, Steers' debut is a stunner.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mostly it's just terribly funny and sad and beautifully acted and terrifically feel-good for being, you know, a cancer comedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Equally harrowing and heartrending, Shame is a film that feels akin to going into battle, and I for one didn't emerge unscathed.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a movie made of moments, the antithesis of "plot-driven," but the sum of these moments is magnificent, the culmination of so many elements: acting, scripting, score (by locals Michael Linnen and David Wingo), and cinematography.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This modest French-language film follows the time-honored cinematic tradition of plot as spearheaded by a simple twist of fate.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    And yet that is what is so very remarkable about the film: In a slim 72 minutes, it heart-tethers us to these teenagers, paying tribute to their unique and private selves while allowing the audience to see its own reflection in them.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I don't want to oversell the thing. It is, quite simply, something very special indeed.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A film that wants you to get happy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Wright takes the tools of a bloodless medium, the video game, and crafts an action-comedy with a true-blue beating heart.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Kazan appears in every scene of The Exploding Girl’s perfectly paced 80 minutes, and you’d miss her if she ducked out for even a moment.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The film can feel a touch overscripted, but Polley and her actors effect true-to-life rhythms of speech.

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