Kimberley Jones

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For 746 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Grand Budapest Hotel
Lowest review score: 0 Waiting...
Score distribution:
746 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This drama-horror hybrid, set within a New York ballet company, strikes a tone more along the lines of the terrifying hallucinatories of Aronofsky's breakout film, "Requiem for a Dream," revisiting, too, favorite themes of monster mommies and female hysteria.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I can't remember the last time I felt so seduced by a film.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    But for all the film's griminess and doom, bad behavior and bad luck, it's hope that engines Head-On.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Swinton is heartbreaking. She's not just craft; she's high art.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Is nothing if not exquisitely detailed: It's like a blood orange that del Toro spends the film seductively unpeeling, revealing layer upon layer of meaning and pathos.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A rattling and ruminative piece of speculative fiction, Ex Machina is good enough to wish it were even better.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s always a pleasure to be in the company of Potter, and when looking back at the just-competent first outings – well, baby, you’ve come a long way – but still: Where’s the magic, huh?
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Ramsay is experimental, unconventional, and forever reaching at the gorgeousness in grief and despair. Her film moves slow as molasses, slow as paint drying -– and all the better to see the colors and the complexities.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    A riot of sight and sound that, however baffling, has an irresistible, elemental pull.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Dogme pedigree rarely distracts; there is too much emotional investment to care much about dogmatic fidelity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Cue the footage of Cockettes in spangles and glitter, high-kicking and belting out show tunes at the top of their lungs. Damn, it looks grand.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Immigrant is two hours long, but I stayed even longer in my seat, through the credits, still in thrall to it all. The title is singular, but the scope is not so easily quantifiable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Provides no revelations and left this viewer, at least, puzzling over whether the picture Cunningham has allowed to develop of him is completely transparent or utterly impenetrable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Filmmakers nicely mix the historical and the tributary, honoring both Bennett's cultural landmark and the dancers who dream of joining its ranks.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s muddy, bloody, and studded with amputated limbs, yet still rather generic-feeling; it lacks the visceral impact of Joe Wright’s version of Western Front atrocities in "Atonement."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    White couldn't stay away, and neither can the band's legions of fans, who bop up and down in sold-out arenas at the reunion tour that provides the film's hopeful coda.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An inner-city tragedy that plays its story simply, sorrowfully, and beautifully.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Living in Emergency, then, is like a hard slap to the face: There is nothing remotely romantic about this grim depiction of two missions in Liberia and Congo in the mid-2000s.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Last Station would have satisfied alone as a witty, manic lark, but as it moves toward the titular railway station, the film unfurls into so much more – a work of compassion, modulated mournfulness, and unchecked joy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A funny, seductive, and surprisingly honest dramatization of the ways we snooker ourselves into incompatible love.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    July sees the world in a most unexpected way, and it's a shame that Me and You's preciousness sometimes overwhelms that uniqueness of vision.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all adds up to a portrait in decency, which isn’t nearly as sexy as the title would suggest.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Wild lands some hard punches, but it can’t sustain the impact. Some of that lies in its inherited arc: Strayed found some peace – the whole point of the trek – but arriving-at-peace is less provocative than the struggle, at least in a movie.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s an indie film about abortion that comes snuggled in the broad strokes of a quirky relationship comedy. A grump might wonder when indie films got so soft, but I’m more intrigued by the inverse: Why aren’t more studio films this clever and winning and conversant in the same language as their audience?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    I laughed, I cried, I longed for a pet dragon to call my own.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Guardians of the Galaxy is an outlier: a space opera in a largely earthbound movie cycle (excepting the occasional red-eye to another dimension in the Thor pictures), candy-colored and bopping where the other Marvel movies are muted and imposing, and the funniest one to date, without a doubt.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Danner’s even better on her own, as she honestly, even angrily, wrangles with not a paradox, per se, just the raw rub of life: that it sucks to be alone, and it’s scary to try not being alone. She’s exquisite.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's a period piece about the origins of psychoanalysis and the sexual confusions of its progenitors that is eloquent and handsomely made, if never quite revelatory.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mud
    With American independent film teeming with so many shaky-cam snarksters, what an electric riposte to the status quo is Nichols, whose films are classically constructed and deadly serious. In his short but potent career, he’s mastered a wide-vistaed eye for the epic and the elemental.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Hunger Games franchise, both in print and onscreen, has been exceptionally clever about cozying away imaginative space for fans to fill in the blanks and cast themselves in the rich drama. That this latest film leaves us hungering for more only means that it’s working.

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