Kimberley Jones

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For 724 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 2046
Lowest review score: 0 Bride Wars
Score distribution:
724 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The film provides invaluable context in its detailing of institutional racism in the Sixties and Seventies and in its emphasis on Ellis as an advocate for equality and as a righteous shit-stirrer.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Something that falls just shy of greatness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The film can feel a touch overscripted, but Polley and her actors effect true-to-life rhythms of speech.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and fierce and deeply moving.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The only weak link here is Aniston's character – her Olivia, stuck in a holding pattern, feels like a holdover from Holofcener's previous, single-girl pictures, and Aniston underplays the role to the point of expressionlessness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    (It should also be noted that Page One wears its pro-Times bias on its sleeve, right up to the rankling but now-common inclusion of a "get involved" Web address at film's end.)
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    To a one, they're terrific. But in this overpacked ensemble cast, it's Binoche you want to see more of.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Gently funny and admirably, even unfashionably humane, People Places Things is at its best beat-to-beat.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    This is provocative stuff, to be sure, in which the stakes are so high that a pratfall concludes with exploding limbs and the anguished effect of its final minutes is a quiet shock to the system. A comedy of errors and terrors? Who woulda thunk it?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Moon doesn't belabor anything, really, so confidently measured and philosophically nuanced it all plays out (aided by a striking, under-the-skin original score by Clint Mansell).
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s best to situate yourself in the middle of the row; a seat at the end will most likely leave you feeling cross-eyed for an hour.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    What a weird, winning little movie is Robot & Frank, which explores what happens to the essential self as the memory goes. Oh, and it's a heist picture. With robot butlers. I'm not sure I've ever seen anything quite like it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    To do no disservice to the impressive work of Bridges' co-stars, anytime his ragged writer, in flowing caftans and floppy hats, is on screen, it's impossible to take in anything else, so commanding is his presence.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Isn't Lee's most personal piece, but it may very well be his most mature.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and sweet and guaranteed to flood you with good feeling.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    [Keaton's] lost none of the spunk, sass, and ditzbomb charm of her "Annie Hall" days. She, quite simply, is marvelous. Too bad her similarly iconic co-star is such a toad. Jack never stops being Jack, to great distraction.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's easy enough to forget there are special effects involved, so convincing is Stu's rippling fur and big beamy eyes filling up with tears.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The sights are ingenious, impressively rendered in 3-D, and the sounds – including cheeky voice work by Mr. T, Neil Patrick Harris, and Benjamin Bratt – are a blast.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Much to cheer here, from its treasure trove of early and alternate versions of songs to the triumphant finale.
    • Austin Chronicle
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Square peg, round hole. That's what the twentysomethings who drift through Margarita Happy Hour are like.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A pretty spot-on distillation of human weakness, but my god, must they all be so inhumane in the process?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    You didn't actually think Stephin Merritt was going to cozy up to the camera and reveal his deepest-darkest, did you?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The easy, fast-talking rapport between the four young women is The Sisterhood’s biggest selling point. Too bad, then, that the premise demands they spend most of the film away from each other.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Bandslam belongs to Connell. He has the unruly 'fro and endearing shamblingness of a young Daniel Stern, and he ably brings to life that rarest of cinematic qualities: decency.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All told, Pitch Perfect isn't all that good – but it's an awfully good sport.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    In a media landscape that only has eyes for the sex lives of nubile young things, Hope Springs' sincere, considered, and unembarrassed exploration of mature sexuality marks a welcome exception.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    In its third act, Life, Above All takes a bit of a dip into la-la land, in terms of believability – how precisely is an impoverished family supposed to have afforded an ambulance and hospice care? – but that doesn't diminish the emotional impact of Manyaka's performance and the idea that courage can be infectious, too.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Canadian director Philippe Falardeau (Oscar nominee for Monsieur Lazhar) films these early, subtitled scenes mostly with a documentarian’s observational remove and slightly shaky camera – an effective way to dramatize the horror of war without exploiting it, tarting it up with Hollywood techniques.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's all vastly superior to Brett Ratner's scorched-earth "X-Men: The Last Stand," of course.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Medem's film is a bleached-out beauty, hitting our most commanding human emotions -- lust to love to grief to rage and back again -- while only occasionally striking a wrong chord.

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