Kimberley Jones

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For 769 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The Grand Budapest Hotel
Lowest review score: 0 When in Rome
Score distribution:
769 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    July sees the world in a most unexpected way, and it's a shame that Me and You's preciousness sometimes overwhelms that uniqueness of vision.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all adds up to a portrait in decency, which isn’t nearly as sexy as the title would suggest.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Wild lands some hard punches, but it can’t sustain the impact. Some of that lies in its inherited arc: Strayed found some peace – the whole point of the trek – but arriving-at-peace is less provocative than the struggle, at least in a movie.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s an indie film about abortion that comes snuggled in the broad strokes of a quirky relationship comedy. A grump might wonder when indie films got so soft, but I’m more intrigued by the inverse: Why aren’t more studio films this clever and winning and conversant in the same language as their audience?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    I laughed, I cried, I longed for a pet dragon to call my own.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Guardians of the Galaxy is an outlier: a space opera in a largely earthbound movie cycle (excepting the occasional red-eye to another dimension in the Thor pictures), candy-colored and bopping where the other Marvel movies are muted and imposing, and the funniest one to date, without a doubt.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's a period piece about the origins of psychoanalysis and the sexual confusions of its progenitors that is eloquent and handsomely made, if never quite revelatory.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mud
    With American independent film teeming with so many shaky-cam snarksters, what an electric riposte to the status quo is Nichols, whose films are classically constructed and deadly serious. In his short but potent career, he’s mastered a wide-vistaed eye for the epic and the elemental.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Hunger Games franchise, both in print and onscreen, has been exceptionally clever about cozying away imaginative space for fans to fill in the blanks and cast themselves in the rich drama. That this latest film leaves us hungering for more only means that it’s working.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Going dramatic, Stiller commits to the role completely; there's something rather admirable in his refusal to pander or soft-pedal the self-serious, frankly unlikable Greenberg.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Mamet does a shrewdly skillful job with these Tinseltown terrors.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Director Lenny Abrahamson establishes a twee tone early that renders tinny the transition into melancholy, and it’s a shame the film so clings to Jon’s perspective. The takeaway is as flat as Frank’s mask. Bemused smile, followed by deflated feeling.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    While The Art of the Steal makes a very convincing – even bone-chilling – argument that the people and foundations that essentially hijacked the Barnes Foundation are primarily concerned with tourist dollars and not the preservation of Barnes' legacy, the film fails to even ponder why easier access to some of the world's greatest art treasures might not be an entirely bad thing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Sisley is a former stand-up comic, although you'd never guess it here: Finding himself in the eye of a colossal shit storm of his own making, his Vincent is brusque and action oriented, his face, a picture of ulceration in progress.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Rush, a film about two real-life titans of Formula One racing in the Seventies, splits its narrative between these oil-and-water personalities, which feels about right: It's only half of a good movie.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Just as marriage does not banish aloneness, proximity to the characters onscreen doesn't unlock any special connection to them.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    In his short career (The Station Agent, The Visitor), McCarthy has established himself as a craftsman of conventionally quirky pictures that are ENTIRELY about ingratiating themselves with the audience.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In an age of doggedly unambitious comedy, one marvels at the finesse these first-time screenwriters and director Feig bring to marrying raunch, romantic comedy, and the tested but ever-true bond between women.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Danner’s even better on her own, as she honestly, even angrily, wrangles with not a paradox, per se, just the raw rub of life: that it sucks to be alone, and it’s scary to try not being alone. She’s exquisite.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Mistress America is maybe Baumbach’s most probing consideration of the writer’s process and development, a continuing point of interest in his filmography, from "Kicking and Screaming" to "The Squid and the Whale" and "Margot at the Wedding."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The issue of late-term abortions tends to inspire polemics from both sides of the debate; Shane and Wilson’s approach – sensitive, measured, workmanlike – is a welcome one.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    The camera may dive deep, but the content skims mere surface.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Civil War’s main battle sequence is so effective because it’s six-on-six, and we’ve spent the past decade getting to know the combatants.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There are no hard truths to be found in Finding Vivian Maier (really, how could there be?), but it’s an engrossing doc nevertheless – a portrait of an American artist hiding in plain sight, a mystery with too few clues, and a sincere inquiry into how best to divine the wishes of the dead.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Appropriately belongs to Lopez. His mannequin glaze and never-wavering smile provide more creepy-crawlies than a thousand quivering violins or perfectly timed thunderclaps.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The filmmakers no doubt had a hell of a time whittling the material down; unfortunately, what they came up with was something long on the mundaneness of GovWorks.com and short on the personalities behind it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    These women are marvelous, with ancient, creased faces and the kind of admirable f...-all attitude that comes with age. I couldn't take my eyes off them.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Trainwreck can be furiously funny. It just goes down too easy. It’s scared of its own sharp edges. The sly raging against the machine of Inside Amy Schumer has gone missing. Here, the rage, curiously, is turned inward.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    That Peace Officer cannot provide a complete picture of the myriad of problems that come with the increased militarization of police isn’t an indictment of the film. This trouble is too big for one film to contain.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Owen’s story is unique, and deserving of singling out.

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