Kimberley Jones

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For 769 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The Grand Budapest Hotel
Lowest review score: 0 Zookeeper
Score distribution:
769 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The U.S. cut, which Wong endorses, runs a slim 108 minutes, and has by all accounts been reshaped for American audiences, who, by and large, don’t have the same foreknowledge of Ip Man, or martial arts, as Asian audiences do.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Surely the most unconventional romantic comedy of the summer, Results isn't anti-plot; it just moves in weird ways.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The Hangover instantly has the feel of one for the ages.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A Girl Cut in Two is Hitchcock sans the whodunit, essentially a long preamble of seduction and spiritual ruin, capped by a crime everyone saw coming (and an eye-dazzling coda that twists the title from metaphor to … something else).
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    When The Company owns up to what it is -– a performance piece -– it’s glorious. Everything else -– the window-dressing of a fiction film -– just gums up that gloriousness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    It's impossible to shake the feeling that these are merely actors -- albeit good ones.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Isn't quite a home run: The visually flat film leans on a pop culture crutch that probably won't age very well, and the finale – while terrifically funny – feels piped in from another, far sillier movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It is certainly competent, lovely to look at, but leaves little lasting impression.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's all so goddamn realistic and reminiscent of real-life love (and how often does that happen onscreen?) that The Puffy Chair would be hell to watch if it weren't so funny.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's a dirty, ugly, joyless world these fathers and sons live in, and for all the passion involved, of retribution and a father's fierce love, Perdition is as emotionally distant as Sullivan. The feelings are all there, just submerged.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The film holds its twists too close to the chest, and there's little to chew on till the ambitiousness of its plotting is revealed late in the film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect it's that spirit as much as the injustice of her incarceration that drew so many people to her cause and inspired this labor-of-love documentary about her journey to hell and back.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In the House, from the eclectic French filmmaker François Ozon (Under the Sand, 8 Women), is an almost perverse delight, an egghead thriller that slyly shell-games its truer purpose as an inquiry into the construction – and deconstruction – of fiction. Scratch deconstruction: Make that tear-the-house-down demolition.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a fun watch, and familiarity with Los Angeles isn’t required to get a kick out of these toe-dips into Koreatown and Tehrangeles and all the other micro-communities that make the city a macro-paradise for eaters.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Starts out as a lark, but veers into grittier, more emotionally complex territory -- just like a real relationship -- that the film doesn't have the chops to sustain.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Taking a cue from the horse in question, Ross’ film takes its time getting into the race, but once it gets going, the going gets good.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    This first release from Disney’s self-explanatory new arm, Disneynature, is at the very least peripherally concerned with the planet and its dwindling prospects, but the real renewable resource here is the groundbreaking "Planet Earth" miniseries.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Hair is personal. It's also political.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Smart, uncanny, resistant to the short cuts of pop psychology, and shocking in the best since of the word, Steers' debut is a stunner.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Screenwriters Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman, and fanboys’ favorite whipping boy, Damon Lindelof, keep the film moving at a quippy clip; there’s really no fat here until the film feints a climax only to lurch the coaster-car back up the hill again.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mostly it's just terribly funny and sad and beautifully acted and terrifically feel-good for being, you know, a cancer comedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A surprisingly warmhearted examination of hypocrisy and social insecurity, unlikely camaraderie and stutter-stepped formation of adult identity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    A certain inevitability hangs over The Mother – as if any of this could end well – but if Kureishi's framework is perhaps predictable, his knotty, complex characters are not.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The film is studded with stirring moments of surprise.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's a wealth of material at odds with a scant running time and shallow focus.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The magnificence of the film's pieces does not quite add up to a satisfying whole.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Equally harrowing and heartrending, Shame is a film that feels akin to going into battle, and I for one didn't emerge unscathed.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    But by the time this imperfect little film wends its way to one of the most winning exit lines I've heard in a long time, it's turned into something, well, perfectly lovely.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It doesn't have the bite to be satire, the pratfalls to be broad comedy, or the wit to pass as a comedy of manners. What does that leave? The French cinematic equivalent of motivational coaching, and -- just like Pignon -- something spectacularly unspectacular.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Pray maintains a steadfastly objective viewpoint, and it's a testament to his film's success that it can accommodate the audience's inevitably shifting allegiances from one family member to the next.

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