Kimberley Jones
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For 677 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Before Night Falls
Lowest review score: 0 Alex & Emma
Score distribution:
677 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect it's that spirit as much as the injustice of her incarceration that drew so many people to her cause and inspired this labor-of-love documentary about her journey to hell and back.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Way never arrives anywhere you couldn't see coming a mile away, but it does so with such empathy that its conclusions feel comforting rather than overly predictable.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There's no question that the actors and filmmakers have fashioned a compelling (if unformed) love story of a certain age – which is not to be confused for a love story for the ages.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Descendants is beautifully shot (by Phedon Papamichael) and compellingly performed, especially by its young stars, and it has moments of startling tenderness. If only it didn't feel phony to its bones.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The script is chockablock with al dente amusements – obvious targets still make for wickedly funny one-liners – and the German actor Waltz (Inglourious Basterds) is terrific as the only parent unburdened by decorum.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    As a portrait of what happens to a family when its glue disappears, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close wrung a bucket of tears out of me.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Big Miracle is all formula, but with just enough savvy to temper the gentle-spiritedness and qualify it as that rare family film with an emotional manipulativeness that doesn't leave a sick slick in the mouth.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    While Man on a Mission doesn't precisely neuter Garriott's weirder ways, it does push them aside for a more boilerplate message of the father/son bond.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    After a sparky first half greatly aided by Kristin Scott Thomas' devilish turn as an unsentimental press secretary, Salmon Fishing grows soggier. It's such a pretty, witty gloss of a picture, it hardly knows what to do with real-world terror, hence the Snidely Whiplash-like limning of Muslim extremists.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The space prison set-pieces get the job done; only in the film's terrestrial bookends does this nuts-and-bolts action film show its rust.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Comedic actor François Damiens mines but never mocks Markus' awkwardness, thereby creating a winning portrait in decency. His tracing, with the ever-luminous Tautou, of the slow bloom of new love is a thing of understated beauty.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's a wealth of material at odds with a scant running time and shallow focus.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Queen of Versailles encourages the very worst tendencies in the audience: to sneer at the Siegels, to marvel at their tackiness, to root for their fall from grace.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    In a media landscape that only has eyes for the sex lives of nubile young things, Hope Springs' sincere, considered, and unembarrassed exploration of mature sexuality marks a welcome exception.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Sleepwalk With Me is never anything less than awfully likable. But I so wanted it to be more.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    While its heart is always in the right place, the humor – especially in the sludgy first act – is hit or miss.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All told, Pitch Perfect isn't all that good – but it's an awfully good sport.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    She knew what "it" was going to be before anyone else. Or maybe she invented "it," and the magazine-buying public simply did as they were told.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What's in a name? Lately, less and less. With Daniel Craig's third go at 007, I'm not sure there's much left that distinguishes Bond from Bourne from Batman. They're all slurping from the same soup – think: death-haunted, self-righteous, tight-lipped and -quipped, parkour enthusiast.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    His (Spielberg) is an old-fashioned style of moviemaking that can produce soaring entertainment or, alternately, a fussed-over theatricality. Minute to minute, Lincoln moves between these extremes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It is certainly competent, lovely to look at, but leaves little lasting impression.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Does Apatow understand his heroes are assholes?
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The former mayor is an alert onscreen presence, but the film surrounding him is not always so lively.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The all-around excellent cast swings with aplomb from silly to sweet.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Snyder has cast Man of Steel with dramatic actors, not action stars, and it pays off.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    More often than not The Heat is just stupid-funny, which circles us back to McCarthy, motor-mouthing four-letter fury like an operatic aria. She sells Mullins as delightfully unhinged and fairly radiating with rage, and it’s irresistible.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Somm doesn’t try to write the book on wine connoisseurship, but it does give good CliffsNotes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The U.S. cut, which Wong endorses, runs a slim 108 minutes, and has by all accounts been reshaped for American audiences, who, by and large, don’t have the same foreknowledge of Ip Man, or martial arts, as Asian audiences do.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Rush, a film about two real-life titans of Formula One racing in the Seventies, splits its narrative between these oil-and-water personalities, which feels about right: It's only half of a good movie.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    There isn’t a false step from the quietly devastating Farahani; her tour-de-force performance carries the film through its rocky stretches.