Kimberley Jones
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For 702 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Past
Lowest review score: 0 Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star
Score distribution:
702 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's the tortoise and the hare, Nepalese-style, and it's surprisingly dramatic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A nice-looking, nice-feeling exercise in conventionalism that sure could use a couple of transvestites and maybe a house falling from the sky.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Ao relentlessly, gleefully dumb -- without being the slightest bit sardonic -- that you just can't help but guffaw … or groan … but probably both.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Medem's film is a bleached-out beauty, hitting our most commanding human emotions -- lust to love to grief to rage and back again -- while only occasionally striking a wrong chord.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The script also takes the occasional dip into hokeyness, but even that is buoyed by its ballsy leading ladies.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all adds up to a portrait in decency, which isn’t nearly as sexy as the title would suggest.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's a dirty, ugly, joyless world these fathers and sons live in, and for all the passion involved, of retribution and a father's fierce love, Perdition is as emotionally distant as Sullivan. The feelings are all there, just submerged.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Throughout, the documentary is fun and engaging, even whimsical when using (to good effect) illustrations and Gilliam’s own storyboards.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It all boils down to trying too hard, when everybody knows a good grift is one that appears effortless.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Murphy's screentime takes a back seat to Douglas', of course, but from that back seat she makes a very big noise.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    As an experiment in mood, as a love song to Paris and to the French New Wave, as a fun, flirty little number, Charlie provides a giddy satisfaction.
    • Austin Chronicle
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Columbus never quite captures the depth, the rich complexities of Rowling's novels. She's written four Harry Potter books for kids that adults swoon for, too. Columbus has made two Harry Potter movies for kids … and we'll leave it at that. That isn't bad. But I suspect there's something better just around the bend.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Movingly captures the terrors and delights of being lovesick at 17. Would that it hadn't felt constrained to target only the 17-year-olds.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The senseless violence of a Jean-Claude Van Dammer, no point to that, but this, this has purpose. This is an ass-kicking a girl can get into. So why do I feel like crying mea culpa?
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Somewhere in that chirpy half-pint frame dwell some meaty comic chops. Goldie Hawn may have found her successor.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The film also inspires, if unconsciously, the viewer to rethink what exactly constitutes art.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's a goofy, tongue-in-cheek, my-gawd-how-could-we-be-so-dumb shrine, but a shrine nonetheless.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Falling in love with the wrong person makes for a far more toothsome melodrama, a fact this small, satisfying picture rightly recognizes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect that, like the Coen brothers, David Lynch, and Wes Anderson -– our American masters of idiosyncrasy -– Kaurismäki has a limited appeal. Those who get him, really get him.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Authenticity is strangely lacking in Laurel Canyon, although Cholodenko’s exquisite eye for framing remains uncorrupted. Laurel Canyon is often visually captivating.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    An admirable effort, but too many words, words, and more words, and not enough of the ache of that half-smile.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    An absorbing human drama.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All told, either you get it or you don't. Film critics and senators with election prospects don't. Kids in the mood to laugh at stupid shit for 87 minutes do. I'll toss my hat in the latter ring with glee.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The latest installment in the Austin Powers series has stopped making much sense at all, but it sure gets its giggle on, and good.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It’s best to situate yourself in the middle of the row; a seat at the end will most likely leave you feeling cross-eyed for an hour.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Taking a cue from the horse in question, Ross’ film takes its time getting into the race, but once it gets going, the going gets good.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Jet Lag's romantic fluffery is somewhat beneath these old pros, but they make its meet-cute scenario work, mostly -– and most especially when crusty, grumpy, grizzled Jean Reno announces he's "totally in love."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The darker stuff begs to be handled less delicately than this dance, and in that respect the director stumbles.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    [Keaton's] lost none of the spunk, sass, and ditzbomb charm of her "Annie Hall" days. She, quite simply, is marvelous. Too bad her similarly iconic co-star is such a toad. Jack never stops being Jack, to great distraction.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Dreamers is infused with the same kind of wistful melancholy that made the French New Wave films so winning, and it’s all gorgeous to look at.

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