For 669 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Before Night Falls
Lowest review score: 0 Alex & Emma
Score distribution:
669 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A pretty spot-on distillation of human weakness, but my god, must they all be so inhumane in the process?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Penn's Bicke is often so pitiable it's hard not to want to look away – but what else to expect from perhaps our most compulsively watchable contemporary actor?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    To do no disservice to the impressive work of Bridges' co-stars, anytime his ragged writer, in flowing caftans and floppy hats, is on screen, it's impossible to take in anything else, so commanding is his presence.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Affectionate but uninsightful biopic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Columbus never quite captures the depth, the rich complexities of Rowling's novels. She's written four Harry Potter books for kids that adults swoon for, too. Columbus has made two Harry Potter movies for kids … and we'll leave it at that. That isn't bad. But I suspect there's something better just around the bend.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Kinsey is too tasteful by half, and while it may have its gentle charms, it never thrills.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Understandably, a filmmaker tackling the retelling of a national hero must do so with great delicacy, but The Sea Inside presents not so much a hero as a saint in Sampredo.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What we get is more of the same from Ferrell – funny faces, goofy accents, pratfalls aplenty – and that ain't bad. It just could have been a lot better.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    All herky-jerky camera movements and no pussyfooting around with the interior lives of these characters.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Makes for a playfully enthralling hour and a half.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    A Girl Cut in Two is Hitchcock sans the whodunit, essentially a long preamble of seduction and spiritual ruin, capped by a crime everyone saw coming (and an eye-dazzling coda that twists the title from metaphor to … something else).
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Just as marriage does not banish aloneness, proximity to the characters onscreen doesn't unlock any special connection to them.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Is Gary Winick atoning for his sins? If “Bride Wars” was an acid spill -- and that’s putting it generously -- then Letters to Juliet is like the safety shower in your high school chemistry class, delivering an unsubtle blast of sanitized sentimentality.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Tonally, it all makes sense, but there’s such a thing as overmuchness. Gibney laudably launches a withering attack here on the pay-to-play relationship between lobbyists and lawmakers. But this viewer felt withered, too, by the end of his battering ram of a movie.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The subdued characters I can abide, intellectually speaking, but subdued filmmaking with material this fundamentally gut-punching is a lot less easy to swallow.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Megamind gets existential, but only in blips, and while it is never anything less than vibrant and exceedingly clever, it is also a rather slight thing for such mega-sized proportions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Those moments, as affecting as they are, can't surmount the overworkshopped feel of the whole film.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Hedlund's got a hell of a voice, rotgut-ragged, and whether he's crooning or wooing, whatever he's selling, and no matter how cornpone, I'm buying.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    You didn't actually think Stephin Merritt was going to cozy up to the camera and reveal his deepest-darkest, did you?
    • 83 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Far more engrossing are the long, dialogue-free stretches that fix on, say, bobbing feet or curled fists on a speed bag. The soundscape, too, is endlessly fascinating, a layer cake of squeaks, grunts, gasps, and rattling chains that, combined, catches a rhythm that sounds an awful lot like song.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The middle of a movie is often where filmmakers lose their way, but Friends With Benefits nails this stretch, in which nothing very remarkable happens as two people talk, in bed and out of bed. There's a fine line between fun-dirty and ick-dirty – sometimes you can't identify the line until it's been crossed – and this film keeps its toes on the right side of raunch.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It's all vastly superior to Brett Ratner's scorched-earth "X-Men: The Last Stand," of course.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Has very little soul to speak of, but it's got swagger to burn.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The Descendants is beautifully shot (by Phedon Papamichael) and compellingly performed, especially by its young stars, and it has moments of startling tenderness. If only it didn't feel phony to its bones.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The U.S. cut, which Wong endorses, runs a slim 108 minutes, and has by all accounts been reshaped for American audiences, who, by and large, don’t have the same foreknowledge of Ip Man, or martial arts, as Asian audiences do.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Big Miracle is all formula, but with just enough savvy to temper the gentle-spiritedness and qualify it as that rare family film with an emotional manipulativeness that doesn't leave a sick slick in the mouth.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The space prison set-pieces get the job done; only in the film's terrestrial bookends does this nuts-and-bolts action film show its rust.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Sturgess, saddled with a caddish character, is less compelling, but he does provide the film's only spot of unloosed, raw emotion. Everything else feels too precisely and too compactly assembled for much impact.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Provides no revelations and left this viewer, at least, puzzling over whether the picture Cunningham has allowed to develop of him is completely transparent or utterly impenetrable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What's in a name? Lately, less and less. With Daniel Craig's third go at 007, I'm not sure there's much left that distinguishes Bond from Bourne from Batman. They're all slurping from the same soup – think: death-haunted, self-righteous, tight-lipped and -quipped, parkour enthusiast.