For 651 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 The Grand Budapest Hotel
Lowest review score: 0 Meet the Spartans
Score distribution:
651 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I don't want to oversell the thing. It is, quite simply, something very special indeed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Moon doesn't belabor anything, really, so confidently measured and philosophically nuanced it all plays out (aided by a striking, under-the-skin original score by Clint Mansell).
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This is an animated film that happily has room for both an existentialist dread of death and a grinning joie de vivre.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I laughed more (sincerely, full-throatedly) at Toy Story 3’s smart comedy than at any other film of the still-young summer movie slate.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Last Station would have satisfied alone as a witty, manic lark, but as it moves toward the titular railway station, the film unfurls into so much more – a work of compassion, modulated mournfulness, and unchecked joy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Fish Tank isn't an easy watch – it's like two hours of ache – but there are rich rewards to be had in the many ways Arnold and her terrific team rend us to and fro.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Kazan appears in every scene of The Exploding Girl’s perfectly paced 80 minutes, and you’d miss her if she ducked out for even a moment.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Wright takes the tools of a bloodless medium, the video game, and crafts an action-comedy with a true-blue beating heart.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Blisteringly entertaining.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This is a quest movie, with a lot of ground covered, and just as our heroes never stay long in one place or feel safe in their surroundings, neither does the audience.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This drama-horror hybrid, set within a New York ballet company, strikes a tone more along the lines of the terrifying hallucinatories of Aronofsky's breakout film, "Requiem for a Dream," revisiting, too, favorite themes of monster mommies and female hysteria.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In an age of doggedly unambitious comedy, one marvels at the finesse these first-time screenwriters and director Feig bring to marrying raunch, romantic comedy, and the tested but ever-true bond between women.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Grief doesn't exactly sound like a promising starting point for a love story, but, really, what a bounty Mills presents to us of beauty and buoyancy and possibility.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Screamingly funny. Like I said, terrific stuff.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    I can't remember the last time I felt so seduced by a film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mostly it's just terribly funny and sad and beautifully acted and terrifically feel-good for being, you know, a cancer comedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Equally harrowing and heartrending, Shame is a film that feels akin to going into battle, and I for one didn't emerge unscathed.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    One wishes for a chewier whodunit – there just aren't enough clues for the viewer to work with – and the reveal of the mole is perversely anticlimactic. But maybe that's just stickling. We always knew Smiley'd get his man.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Excepting the occasional shot that forces the eye on a particular dancer, Wenders largely films the action in a way that re-creates the effect of attending a performance in a proscenium theatre – only without having to scrabble for the best seat in the house. No matter where you are, you're already in it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Anderson and his co-writer Roman Coppola have crafted an elegant and emphatic metaphor for adolescence, that tumultuous province of firsts and lasts.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The film can feel a touch overscripted, but Polley and her actors effect true-to-life rhythms of speech.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A manic, lithesome thing, 2 Days in New York flexes between broad comedy and a beautifully observed portrait of family life – especially life after death.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Looper makes a full-meal entertainment out of piecemealing genres: It boasts the kicky mental gymnastics that come with time-travel terrain, the relentless rapid heart rate of a crackerjack thriller, and the bursts of extreme violence, buttressed with black humor, of a modern actioner.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's a mistake to confuse Zero Dark Thirty for "truth" – that would be a disservice to the high level of craftsmanship, from first-billed actors to below-the-line production crew, at work in this movie fiction – but there is admirably little fat on its bones.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    And yet that is what is so very remarkable about the film: In a slim 72 minutes, it heart-tethers us to these teenagers, paying tribute to their unique and private selves while allowing the audience to see its own reflection in them.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mud
    With American independent film teeming with so many shaky-cam snarksters, what an electric riposte to the status quo is Nichols, whose films are classically constructed and deadly serious. In his short but potent career, he’s mastered a wide-vistaed eye for the epic and the elemental.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In the House, from the eclectic French filmmaker François Ozon (Under the Sand, 8 Women), is an almost perverse delight, an egghead thriller that slyly shell-games its truer purpose as an inquiry into the construction – and deconstruction – of fiction. Scratch deconstruction: Make that tear-the-house-down demolition.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and touching, Frances Ha may very well be the most eloquent take yet on a generation in flux – a cinematic talk-back to so many Atlantic articles, minus the scolding and the statistics, and uncharacteristically (for Baumbach) uncynical.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The movie moves episodically, leisurely, through roughly a decade, and that feels like a gift: to nestle in with these extraordinary, ordinary people and get to know them.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Audience fortitude aside: This is compulsively watchable stuff, a masterstroke of thoughtful direction and thought-provoking performance.