Kimberley Jones

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For 792 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 La La Land
Lowest review score: 0 View from the Top
Score distribution:
792 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In the House, from the eclectic French filmmaker François Ozon (Under the Sand, 8 Women), is an almost perverse delight, an egghead thriller that slyly shell-games its truer purpose as an inquiry into the construction – and deconstruction – of fiction. Scratch deconstruction: Make that tear-the-house-down demolition.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and touching, Frances Ha may very well be the most eloquent take yet on a generation in flux – a cinematic talk-back to so many Atlantic articles, minus the scolding and the statistics, and uncharacteristically (for Baumbach) uncynical.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The movie moves episodically, leisurely, through roughly a decade, and that feels like a gift: to nestle in with these extraordinary, ordinary people and get to know them.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Audience fortitude aside: This is compulsively watchable stuff, a masterstroke of thoughtful direction and thought-provoking performance.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Shot in winter grays with no warming ambers and the whiff of tuberculosis hanging around all the players, Inside Llewyn Davis is a chilly thing – a nominal comedy in brisk shivers.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Her
    If in previous films "Adaptation" and "Being John Malkovich" Jonze seemed a little squirmy about sex, his treatment here is fully adult and keenly sensitive to the complexities of sexual intimacy – how it relates to emotional intimacy, whether or not a flesh-and-blood body is required to achieve it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A restless, nervy actor, Hardy seems to get a kick out of tying one hand behind his back. He dominated "The Dark Knight Rises" even with a modified ball gag obscuring most of his face. Here, locked behind a steeling wheel and a conceptual gimmick, he only has the upper half of his body to work with. No surprise to anybody who’s been paying attention: Half a Hardy adds up to a hell of a lot.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The Immigrant is two hours long, but I stayed even longer in my seat, through the credits, still in thrall to it all. The title is singular, but the scope is not so easily quantifiable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s an indie film about abortion that comes snuggled in the broad strokes of a quirky relationship comedy. A grump might wonder when indie films got so soft, but I’m more intrigued by the inverse: Why aren’t more studio films this clever and winning and conversant in the same language as their audience?
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Snowpiercer holds its own; it’s an unruly but rattling – and ravishing – work of art. On first watch, I wondered if there was anything to scratch beneath the surface – it seemed so straightforward, I worried there wasn’t enough there there – so I rewatched it almost right away and was surprised to find it still left me panting.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    God Help the Girl is not so perfectly crafted, but the promise – oh, the promise is irresistible.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A Most Violent Year is its own thing, hypnotic and exacting and as subtly savage as mellow-voiced Marvin Gaye’s “Inner City Blues (Makes Me Wanna Holler),” which opens the film and sets the tone. I was fully in thrall to it all.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Its audacity is entirely matched by its artistry.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Even more extraordinary than the concept or its conceptualization is how intensely moving an experience it all amounts to.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Sorkin smashes the cradle-to-grave biopic mold with Steve Jobs. R.I.P., I guess. It’s called a mold for a reason.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    McKay makes moral outrage wickedly entertaining.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The whole film is a delicious excuse to gawk – at the magnificent costumes, at the diplomatic dance of museum personnel and party planners, and at the sumptuous squish of so many egos sharing space.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Maggie’s Plan is an ensemble piece, with Maya Rudolph, Travis Fimmel, and a magic, romantic New York rounding out the cast. They’re all great, but it’s Gerwig who’s just so damn gosh-wow.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Owen’s story is unique, and deserving of singling out.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Nobody’s a monster here, and that’s the subtle, aching rub of Little Men: Everyone is right in their claim, depending on the right angle, be it economic, sentimental, moral, or fraternal.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    This movie is delightful – funny and dreamy and sometimes desperately sad.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Swinton is heartbreaking. She's not just craft; she's high art.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Appropriately belongs to Lopez. His mannequin glaze and never-wavering smile provide more creepy-crawlies than a thousand quivering violins or perfectly timed thunderclaps.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Is nothing if not exquisitely detailed: It's like a blood orange that del Toro spends the film seductively unpeeling, revealing layer upon layer of meaning and pathos.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Something that falls just shy of greatness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's easy enough to forget there are special effects involved, so convincing is Stu's rippling fur and big beamy eyes filling up with tears.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Writer/director Lonergan succeeds at capturing eloquently the disappointments of growing up and growing old. But he isn't always successful at reining in the schmaltz.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The terrific ensemble acting and Troche’s genuine, nonjudgmental interest in exploring the weird places wounded people go, both internally and externally, amount to an insulated but moving portrait of the real nuclear family.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The magnificence of the film's pieces does not quite add up to a satisfying whole.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Sollett’s first feature is a small, but indelible picture, one that approaches the most universal of themes -– first love, confused hormones, parental clashes -– with originality.

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