Kimberley Jones
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For 691 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Before Night Falls
Lowest review score: 0 View from the Top
Score distribution:
691 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A film that is at once elegant and sublimely silly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The film, a distinctly secular take on Waugh's religiosity, is far more interested in the battle of blind faith vs. rigid unbelief and its devastating effects. Herein, everyone is complicated – by their station, their philosophy, their God – and everyone is complicit.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It's a rattling, heartrending performance (Moore) in, yes, a long, hard slough of a film – one that is well worth the journey, if not a repeat trip.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The upshot to a ticking bomb is that it only explodes the once, but Rachel's sister, Kym (Hathaway), goes off again and again.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The deeply heartfelt Milk is more of a surface skim: a fairly standard biopic – if a very fine one, indeed – but never the transcendent work one would have hoped from the filmmaker or his subject.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Funny and fierce and deeply moving.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Because Wendy and Lucy is so lean on plot and dialogue, there are long spaces to contemplate Wendy and her situation, and the logistics are mind-boggling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The Hangover instantly has the feel of one for the ages.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A funny, seductive, and surprisingly honest dramatization of the ways we snooker ourselves into incompatible love.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The sights are ingenious, impressively rendered in 3-D, and the sounds – including cheeky voice work by Mr. T, Neil Patrick Harris, and Benjamin Bratt – are a blast.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Cotillard doesn't look part Native American or sound like a Thirties Chicago moll, but damned if she isn't a sight and sound to behold. Whatever her technical limitations, she rises above them to breathe a flesh, blood, and battered verisimilitude into the part. You can't tear your eyes off her, any more than you can Mann's flawed but still engrossing picture.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Why wait for 2012? If you're hankering for a taste of the apocalypse, the opening sequence of this eye-opening, stomach-queasing doc has plenty to go on – witness menacing superimpositions on a bleak, blighted landscape – and the hits just keep on coming.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    They don't make women, sexy but regal, like Pfeiffer much anymore, and Cheri is quite a monument to her.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The middle is terrific, especially in a lengthy, unassuming scene in which the three leads sit, sip drinks, and have a good chat: It marks one of the great celluloid pleasures of the year, so virtuosically written, performed, and filmed is it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A staggering document of the lengths parents will go to for the sake of their child.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Refn’s artful and energetic film never goes further than face value.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Hair is personal. It's also political.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Linklater has crafted an always genial and at times even joyful period charmer about that moment on the cusp: before a boy becomes a man and another man becomes a mythological figure.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    All told, The Young Victoria is a very well-made if not especially memorable picture, moving with all the grace and steadfastness of a waltz Victoria and Albert share, but absent any urgency or anything particularly exclamatory.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    While The Art of the Steal makes a very convincing – even bone-chilling – argument that the people and foundations that essentially hijacked the Barnes Foundation are primarily concerned with tourist dollars and not the preservation of Barnes' legacy, the film fails to even ponder why easier access to some of the world's greatest art treasures might not be an entirely bad thing.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There is, quite simply, a rather refreshing ordinariness to Remember Me in the unflashy, knuckle-down attention it gives to character development and the building of plausible and involving family and friend dynamics.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Going dramatic, Stiller commits to the role completely; there's something rather admirable in his refusal to pander or soft-pedal the self-serious, frankly unlikable Greenberg.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Living in Emergency, then, is like a hard slap to the face: There is nothing remotely romantic about this grim depiction of two missions in Liberia and Congo in the mid-2000s.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    An entirely sympathetic portrait of the artist at an advancing age. That's right, artist – and to a generation that knows Rivers only as a screeching red-carpet provocateur or as an overknifed monstrosity, that revelation alone is worth the cost of admission.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Nolan’s end-act pacing has always felt ponderous – but it’s not enough to ruin what is surely the most intellectually and viscerally engaging action film in years. The soul doesn’t stir, no, but everything else is wildly somersaulting.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Refreshingly anti-princess and sweet without degrading into sugary, Ramona and Beezus animates Ramona's frequent flights of fancy with DIY-like sequences that literalize, quite charmingly, how a kid colors the world.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    There are good guys we don't care much about and bad guys that we do and even badder guys we're supposed to hate. But on the sliding scale of culpability, everybody's just a few clicks away from the next guy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A surprisingly warmhearted examination of hypocrisy and social insecurity, unlikely camaraderie and stutter-stepped formation of adult identity.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    LaBeouf plays Jacob as no naif – he can be as slippery and savage as the next suit – but there's also real tenderness in his scenes with Mulligan and Langella (in a small but significant role as Jacob's mentor).
    • 85 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The scoped camerawork is a shrewd tactic; only occasionally does its flat, proscenium effect make the action feel overly staged.

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