For 1,223 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kyle Smith's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 48
Highest review score: 100 56 Up
Lowest review score: 0 Tim and Eric's Billion Dollar Movie
Score distribution:
1,223 movie reviews
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Writer-director John Gray, who created "Ghost Whisperer" on TV, is a son of Brooklyn whose love for the borough is as thick as a pint of Guinness, and he keeps finding fresh ways to present familiar plot points.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Director Susanne Bier's chilly morality play is slow to get started, but once established, its three parallel stories comment provocatively on one another.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Picture Monty Python writing an unusually odd "Twilight Zone" episode directed by surrealist Luis Buñuel. Or just empty your mind of all sense: This is Rubber.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    As for Grant, who hasn't been this sharp since "Love Actually" six years ago, he is once again the prime minister of cute comedy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    An open- and-shut case, but that doesn't mean it can't also be an entertaining one.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    First-time writer-director Adam Reid has a lightly endearing touch as he allows the actors plenty of space to be warm without being cute.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Camp often means a lack of feeling and generalized disdain; not so in Spork, which has as much heart as "Sixteen Candles."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Director Matthew Vaughn, who did last year's delightful "Kick-Ass," doesn't do witty this time around, but he does keep up a spiffing pace while making the action blaze.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The loose feel and sense for random comedy (as when a bore suddenly starts lecturing Coogan about the geological details of the cliff he is standing on) are spiffy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    As Popper himself notices, his and the penguins' saga gets so endearing that it could have been narrated by Morgan Freeman.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Pity the crowds expecting another cute comedy like "Date Night" who wind up at Crazy, Stupid, Love. It'll be like asking for a burger and getting served escargot.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    How dark is this comedy? It's a big hit in Ireland.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The movie is more a situation than a narrative, and it's repetitive and depressing. One interrupter -- a murderer who did 14 years in prison -- says of the program, "In essence, it's just a Band-Aid." At best: One of his colleagues gets shot in the back for his peacekeeping effort.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Gentle, tender and very French, The Hedgehog is cinematic poetry -- too bad about that prosaic plotting.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    So this bourgeois-bohemian movie is, in a way, as serene in its obliviousness to the exterior world as its man-child subject. It's not essential, but it is endearing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Harks back to a 1960s idea of what a horror film should be.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Footloose won me over early, with a sequence in which the hero gets all heavy metal while restoring his badass ... VW Bug.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Killing Bono begs to be remade with A-list stars but, given Neil's history of near-misses, probably won't be.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Take a stroll down London Boulevard if you enjoy surly, smart, hard-edged British crime movies like "Sexy Beast" and "Croupier."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The magical mystery that is Paul McCartney may never be solved, but for fans (the line forms behind me), the new documentary The Love We Make includes some memorable displays of his world-conquering charm.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    There are several adorable musical numbers that make excellent use of Adams. Segel's dancing is . . . well, he reminded me of a huge star: Big Bird.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    I'm not, finally, sure what Leigh is saying - but she is a filmmaker with a voice.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    It's smart, funny, agreeably perverse and simultaneously abrupt and exhausting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Thick-necked, booze-loving and angry men beat each other with their naked fists: so far, so Irish. But the feuding clans in the documentary Knuckle actually think their habits of antagonizing one another can be fixed by just one more problem-solving brawl.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    In the compelling but slow-moving Iranian film A Separation, a downbeat family drama of no particular distinction gradually turns into a mystery that raises painful moral questions. There may be several guilty parties.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Forsaken in a cruel wilderness, a man looks to God and pleads for help. Receiving no answer, he says, "F- -k, I'll do it myself."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    France's Declaration of War has it all: comedy, romance, fantasy, musical interludes and a child with a brain tumor. Wait - what?
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Like "Once," this film is a tender little piece of heartbreak.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The cheesehead noir Thin Ice presents Greg Kinnear in a role that's almost too easy for him: He's a morally flexible Wisconsin insurance salesman for whom honesty is the least-likely policy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Boy
    This charming kid's-eye movie, full of comical and vivid detail about the lives of these cheerful children, has the loose, lanky feel of a memoir and of French New Wave films.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Credit Westfeldt, who is also the writer and director, with a classic setup for farce, brightly executed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Once it calms down and stops trying to be funny, it turns into a thoughtful and intriguing drama.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The dialogue, while filthy, is wickedly funny, and sounds perfect coming out of the mouths of these beaten-down characters in their low-rent surroundings.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Dafoe proves to have the right blend of ruggedness and sensitivity for this conflicted hero. The actor's habit of maintaining a lavishly styled coiffure in all situations, even when his character is meant to be sleeping in the rain for days on end, is becoming distracting, though.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    So gripping and focused that it easily bests Hollywood movies with 50 times its budget.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Fightville, you had me at "gladiator school."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The Avengers is neither overwhelming nor underwhelming. What it expertly is, is whelming.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The main flaw is that, as an actor, Duplass isn't able to make the audience love him. Picture "Bottle Rocket"-era Owen Wilson in the role, and you've got something special.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Despite its excesses, Savage" is never unintentionally funny, just gritty and mean. The run time is more than two hours, yet it's also tight: no drag, no waste, no message.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    I haven't seen a timelier or more important film this year, and the film's passion for school choice could hardly be more warranted. Along with documentaries such as "The Lottery" and "Waiting for 'Superman,' " the film comes with a background sound of the ice of inertia cracking.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    No one loves a broad comedy like the French, but Gallic touches of restraint tend to keep such light entertainment pleasing rather than blundering.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Like a lesser Python entry ("The Meaning of Life"?), it's alternately brilliant and frustrating.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    A hilarious Parker Posey provides her customary blast of brittle energy in Price Check, an engaging corporate comedy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    When Hopkins' Hitch directs the audience by waving his hands like a symphony conductor - it's a nice callback to a Hannibal Lecter highlight - it's one of the best scenes of the year: a delightfully personal way to show how the story of "Psycho" concluded.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    An intensity of purpose and a patient, suspenseful directing style make the B-movie Universal Soldier: Day of Reckoning superior to most of the big-budget action films I've seen lately.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Django Unchained might have been a revelation in 2005. But after Quentin Tarantino and others have spent years spoofing '60s and '70s genre movies, this mock spaghetti Western tastes like it came out of the microwave.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Cruise's Jack Reacher is a loner who doesn't smile, charm, love the ladies, aim his index fingers to the heavens or sing "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling" in bars. Here he just snarls and kills people. Yes, please, and let's have more of the same.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    What's best about the film are its quick jumps from one depravity to the next as jazz rambles on the soundtrack: Youth is a candle to be burned at both ends, with (as it was once said about Bob Dylan) a blowtorch in the middle.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The line between honey and syrup is a fine one, I'll grant you, but "Best Exotic Marigold" was on the wrong side of it. Quartet carries a noble glow, as serene and beautiful as sunset.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Nature films don’t come any more spectacular than the BBC’s One Life.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Writer-director Antonio Campos, making excellent use of the queasy rhythms of a percussive musical score, keeps piling up the dread as we wonder just how dangerous Simon can be to the women who keep taking pity on him.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Typically, To the Wonder seems mostly locked in the thoughts of its characters, whispered so only we can hear, with no more actual back-and-forth dialogue than would cover the back of your ticket stub.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    In the most thrilling sequence of this consistently rousing old-school adventure, Heyerdahl grabs a passing shark with his bare hands, thrusts a hook into it, drags it aboard and guts it with a knife. Now that’s what I call entertainment. I haven’t seen such crazed brutality since Lou Lumenick’s review of “Movie 43.”
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Baumbach seems mainly interested in capturing the whimsical rhythms of unformed post-college life, with money too scarce and roommates too ample — but he already did that, did it better and with more rueful feeling, in the much funnier “Kicking and Screaming,” the debut he made at 25 and one of the best films of the 1990s.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Despite Gibney’s best efforts to put a halo on Manning, the enormity of what the soldier did towers over what has been done to him.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    This material cries out for big-budget treatment by a real master like Paul Thomas Anderson or Martin Scorsese.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    There is stuff in This Is the End that had me laughing so hard, I sensed new body parts joining in to help out — my pancreas was heaving, my bile ducts ripped.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    A clever, elliptical, slightly bizarre and altogether transfixing psychological thriller.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Somm does a fairly impressive job of making wine tasting somewhat cinematic despite its being essentially unfilmable, at least until taste-o-vision comes along.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The Way, Way Back is balanced, satisfying, wholesome. Dig in.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Bloody horror flicks need not be anemic when it comes to intelligence. The victims of You’re Next, as well as their slaughterers, are reasonably smart and resourceful. Their clash may not be as nasty as the battles of academia, but there’s a lot more common sense involved.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Rush, though it will win no trophies, is fine filmmaking, a smart, visually engorged, frequently thrilling tale of boyish competition — inspired by a true story. At heart it’s “Amadeus” on wheels, only this time Salieri is the Austrian.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The film is still a gripping experience, though, with its circling sharks, its sun-dappled beauty and its agonies of shattered hope. At one point I was convinced that Sandra Bullock would splash down next to our man in her space capsule and Hanks’ Maersk ship from “Captain Phillips” would steam by to pick up both of them.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    For all its glutinous cuteness, damn if About Time doesn’t sneak up and sock you in the tear ducts. I tried not to fall for it. I failed.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    It’s Margaux, the tragic supermodel and failed actress who took her own life at 42, who emerges as the film’s fount of heartbreak in several stunning scenes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    To keep this one-man show visually engaging, director Sophie Fiennes places the professor in sets and costumes from the movies, talking about “Full Metal Jacket” from atop a barracks toilet and “Brief Encounter” from a 1940s British train.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Touching and unexpectedly funny moments (such as McCartney busting out the theme song from “The Monkees”) mingle with highlights from the show for an unusually compelling keepsake from what might well be the last time many of these ’60s rockers perform together.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The Coens, so cutting to so many of their characters, are gentler with Llewyn, inviting us to wander and wonder along with him as he ponders why he must forever play the jerk.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Soundly structured, smart and fast, with a plausible central scenario, several gripping moments and well-wrought dialogue.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    RoboCop is topically up-to-the-moment but stylistically it’s retro. Far from using the story as an excuse to string together cheap thrills and blowout spectacle, its hero has all the heart of the Tin Man.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Najafi stages action scenes with an intense, queasy beauty and elevates what is in its outlines a routine crime drama to near-operatic proportions.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    As subtle and careful and slyly disturbing as Child’s Pose is though, it and many others of its genus suffer from an airlessness, pacing like the growth of algae, a dishwater color palate and a dirge-like monotone.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    A wicked little horror film in which nearly all of the violence takes place in your head, In Fear expertly builds terror out of not much more than two people driving around in a car.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Top performances by Guy Pearce and Felicity Jones, though, make the film emotionally rich.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    This Morgan Freeman-narrated documentary doesn’t stray much from the nature-doc formula of making its stars look frisky and winsome while sprinkling in a few info-nuggets about the critters (they’re older than dinosaurs!). And that’s just fine.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    A captivating Tom Hardy is in the driver’s seat for the one-man show Locke, but like many experimental films, this one suffers from its self-imposed constraints.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Based on a lesser-known Dostoyevsky work, Brit director Richard Ayoade’s breathtakingly realized oddity will appeal to fans of David Lynch and the comic surrealism of Terry Gilliam’s “Brazil.”
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The film, like the man, is never boring.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Writer-director Jon S. Baird has devilish fun with the hilarious black-comic elements of Irvine Welsh’s novel, but the incessant bad behavior does get a wee bit monotonous, and the twist ending is disappointingly pat.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    A sickening horror parable disguised as a comedy of mores, the Netherlands’ Borgman is a rarity: a genuinely shocking, upsetting movie.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Its young director, however, has a considerable flair for surprise and visual gusto, and he even, on a shoestring, delivers sharp-looking special effects.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    It isn’t quite as clever as it thinks. This is one of those man-written feminist parables that looks an awful lot like a Penthouse art director’s idea of a feminist parable.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Roger Ebert makes an unusual candidate for a documentary: He was a writer, which isn’t cinematic, and not the swashbuckling kind. He didn’t go to war zones, just movies.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    There are enough sharp one-liners and funny situations to keep things entertaining even as Braff delves (lightly) into genuine dilemmas confronting many a married couple.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The attraction between the resolutely empirical scientist and his “spiritual,” hippy-dippy girlfriend gives the film an unpredictable quality.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    In a captivating climax, the movie turns attractively freaky, though somewhat marred by cheesy special effects, and there’s a huge debt to the immense leaps of “2001.” An abrupt ending feels frustrating and leaves questions floating in space. Then again, I’m using only 3 to 5 percent of my capacity, so what do I know?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Nearly as good as the average episode of TV’s “Friday Nights Lights,” which makes it better than most movies and one of the better sports films of recent years.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Yousef’s story, which he retells in the documentary The Green Prince, is one of unimaginable courage and moral awakening.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The gimmicky title is doubly misleading: The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby is neither a mystery nor Beatles-themed, but it is an elegantly wrought tale of anguish.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Mesmerizing, eerie and unpredictably weird.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Who gets to say what art is? Does honest emotion count for more than cold abstraction? If Andy Warhol likes it, does that make it OK? Big Eyes toys with some amusing ideas, and that’s enough.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Dialogue, we seem to have forgotten, matters, and the words — by the brutally funny screenwriter of “The Departed,” William Monahan — are electric eels, slithering and sinister and nasty. They sneak up and sting you, or sometimes tickle your toes. Lowlifes don’t actually talk this way? Yeah. But if only they did.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Ends up feeling familiar.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The highlight is a meta touch: A funny on-screen résumé is posted each time we meet a new character.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Watching it is like being the only non-stoned person in the room as someone tells a long, long story.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    For short stretches, the movie has a touch of surreal "Office Space" brilliance, but it's broadly acted, its characters are thin, and the production values are ragged. Still, it's hard to resist its goofy hostility: "You're like the drummer from REO Speedwagon. Nobody knows who you are."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The mild British wackiness is more droll than funny, but the movie is a pleasant cup of tea.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    On the M. Night Shyamalan scale of stupid endings, The Prestige isn't as bad as "The Village" but it's comparable to "Unbreakable."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A boldly original undertaking: It's the first movie ever to come up with the idea of remaking "The Truman Show."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    All three segments are heavy on blame-America speeches, which may be a fair snapshot of Iraqi opinion, but it's strange how fond Longley seems to be of Saddam Hussein.

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