For 1,473 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kyle Smith's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 49
Highest review score: 100 Patriots Day
Lowest review score: 0 Tideland
Score distribution:
1473 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    We may not need another IRA movie, but even so, Ken Loach's Brit-bashing historical drama The Wind That Shakes the Barley, winner of the top prize at Cannes last year, raises hard questions about Ireland's uncanny ability to kneecap itself.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Loaded with dazzling ideas that don’t ultimately pull together.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Baumbach seems mainly interested in capturing the whimsical rhythms of unformed post-college life, with money too scarce and roommates too ample — but he already did that, did it better and with more rueful feeling, in the much funnier “Kicking and Screaming,” the debut he made at 25 and one of the best films of the 1990s.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Hunger is almost silent, most of its sounds being unintelligible moans and screams.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The loose feel and sense for random comedy (as when a bore suddenly starts lecturing Coogan about the geological details of the cliff he is standing on) are spiffy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 38 Kyle Smith
    The teen movie The Spectacular Now begins like “Say Anything” but soon turns into “Drink Anything.”
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Once it calms down and stops trying to be funny, it turns into a thoughtful and intriguing drama.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Steve Jobs is a tale of two men, not one: A more accurate, not to say wittier, title would have been “Steve Jobs and Aaron Sorkin.”
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Kyle Smith
    The White Ribbon is one of the finest films that ever repelled me, a holiday in the abyss.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Kyle Smith
    The highest praise I can give a superhero movie is that it makes me forget about its 10-cent-comic-book soul.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Kyle Smith
    Sicario, which combines dizzying action scenes with a taut script, ravishing photography and an otherwordly musical score, is a knockout.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    At Berkeley casts a nonjudgmental eye on everyone from cement layers to students discussing Thoreau to administrators complaining about budgeting. If only everything were interesting.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    As the two coaches head for a faceoff in a climactic live TV interview, writer Morgan starts to seem like a rip-off -- of himself.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Kyle Smith
    A small but shattering film that marks its writer-director, Derek Cianfrance, as an artist of real depth, observes relationship dynamics at a molecular level, welling with as much understanding as Ingmar Bergman's "Scenes from a Marriage."
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    If Top Five doesn’t go deep, though, it is intermittently very funny.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Wajda, who lost his father in the purge, gives the film an awful silence and mystery at its core.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    A captivating Tom Hardy is in the driver’s seat for the one-man show Locke, but like many experimental films, this one suffers from its self-imposed constraints.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Mesmerizing, eerie and unpredictably weird.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 38 Kyle Smith
    No
    No, which has been nominated for this year’s Best Foreign Language Film Oscar, is largely a gimmick picture: At all times, it looks like hastily assembled news footage shot on grainy videotape in 1988. That means light flaring up to spoil the image, bumpy camerawork, a nearly square picture and all-around grubbiness.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Clipped, controlled and composed, Jackie Kennedy was a woman of her times, but since composure doesn’t win you Oscar nominations, Natalie Portman opts to play the part with a sort of emotional incontinence.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    A real actioner, generous with the bullets and blood and chase scenes, that simultaneously mocks shoot-'em-ups.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Django Unchained might have been a revelation in 2005. But after Quentin Tarantino and others have spent years spoofing '60s and '70s genre movies, this mock spaghetti Western tastes like it came out of the microwave.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 25 Kyle Smith
    At the end of it all comes McKay’s big angry harrumph about the meaning of the crisis — a sign of failed, frustrated satire. If you can make your message clear through comedy, there’s no need to say, “Here’s my moral.” A funnyman can’t afford to get caught wagging his finger.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    An affecting and beautifully realized documentary.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Kyle Smith
    The Wrestler offers something to pretty much everyone in the audience. Much like "The Sopranos," it creates a world that might make you feel utterly at home or exhilarated by strange horrors. Maybe both.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    In the utterly routine effort Skyfall, we're actually expected to cheer each chord we've heard so many times (here's a martini shaker! Look, it's a Walther PPK! And there's an Aston Martin!) We've been turned into wretched Pavlovian dogs, salivating at the bell instead of the snack. The highlight, by far, is a classic animated credit sequence: Adele, you are the new Shirley Bassey.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 38 Kyle Smith
    Inherent Vice, meandering even by Anderson’s standards, is easily the worst of his movies, a soporific 2½-hour endurance test.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 38 Kyle Smith
    The movie independently bungles everything it tries, like a Central Park busker who simultaneously sucks at juggling, harmonica playing and skateboarding.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The shamelessness with which Star Wars: The Force Awakens replays the franchise’s greatest hits is startling. To put it another way, it’s a satisfying meal — but it’s $200 million worth of leftovers.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    The movie falls into the same uneasy category as "Eight Legged Freaks": too tongue-in-cheek to be thrilling, not funny enough to be a comedy.

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